08-01-2015, 06:58 AM
#1
User Info
I moved to a new building and lo and behold, I started getting a lot of wifi issues: disconnects and slowdowns that only a router restart solved temporarily. Then I realized that what was good in a single family home or that old building in Prague with huge thick walls was not the case here. I could see other networks at full strength and others could see mine. 



One of the tenants decided to "borrow" my bandwidth without asking. For what purpose? Who knows: could be legal or criminal- worst case (for him) the police would have knocked at my door - not his....



So this is the deal:
If your password looks like this:
ElvisPresley12345 
Or
iLoveLadyGagaSmile
Or
JackInTheBox-please


Then anyone can spoof your password within minutes, with free software that a child can use. 


What to do?
1) turn OFF the WPS feature. That one is literally like having no password at all


2) switch to Wpa2 encryption 


3) use a LONG password without actual words in it or dates or phone numbers. The maximum length is 63 ascii characters (a-zA-Z0-9 and all the punctuation symbols)


For example:
Instead of 


ElvisTheKing


Which will be cracked in no time 
Use this


E3_l11-v"-!~~S5,(t(h(H(e}]_kInn6gG


That would take a very long time to crack and the thief would probably move on. 


Myself, i have a completely randomly generated password. It will require a special installation of hardware to crack, using brute force, and common hoodlums don't have access to such systems. 


It is a but tricky to get into my cellphones, i need to save it to a file, copy to the phone, edit the file in the phone and cut and paste it in the phone wifi settings. 


On the other hand, that solved all the wifi issues i had experienced earlier and probably did not notice in the previous places where I lived.

8 950
Reply
 08-01-2015, 07:31 AM
#2
  • Thug
  • Active Member
  • South Africa
User Info
You are 100% correct in the way you are now applying your password.

What I like to do as well is rename the router to something like "The_FBI_Is_Watching_You", which freaks the neighbours out. In your case you could use "The Mossad". Biggrin

0 403
Reply
 08-01-2015, 07:48 AM
#3
  • Mr_Smartepants
  • Senior Member
  • Cambridgeshire, UK (CONUS post address)
User Info
Or "Mossad_Surveilance_van#3" Biggrin

48 2,072
Reply
 08-01-2015, 08:08 AM
#4
User Info
My WiFi connection is called " Please Don't steal my WiFi" my Chromecast that shows up as a WiFi connection right under  it is named "because I am watching you". I live in a small town though haven't been in the new house long but when I met the neighbors that's one of the first things they mentioned Biggrin

3 1,356
Reply
 08-01-2015, 08:13 AM
#5
User Info
Mine is titled "Not Yours". One of my neighbors is titled "FBI surveillance"

154 3,751
Reply
 08-01-2015, 08:17 AM
#6
User Info
Also I have xfinity. The password for my WiFi is long and very random . I don't see how anybody could figure out my password unless they broke into my house and read the side of my modem. Plus Comcast can tell me exactly what devices are connected to my internet. Mine was running kind of slow and I had to call them and they informed me I was running a t.v. 3 cell phones and 2 tablets. They said if I wanted faster internet to turn the WiFi off some of my devices .

3 1,356
Reply
 08-01-2015, 08:20 AM
#7
User Info
Since we are the topic of router names, some "experts" suggest to disable wifi broadcast so a potential spoofers won't see your network. It is a pile of bullocks, the network is visible just fine for anyone who is trying to spoof it, those tools don't care about the name of the network, which in that case would be "".

8 950
Reply
 08-01-2015, 08:24 AM
#8
User Info
Why not just enter your IP address in your browser search bar and keep a check on what devices are on your WiFi. I'm all about security and what not but WiFi is a must for me .

3 1,356
Reply
 08-01-2015, 09:09 AM
#9
User Info
Justin : could you rephrase your question?

8 950
Reply
 08-01-2015, 09:21 AM
#10
User Info
In America things may be different I've been to Israel but I didn't do much web surfing . Here your IP address or internet provider address is found on the sides of the modems,if its not one can go to Google and say what's my IP address. A number will pop up from there you type that number usually with an http:// in front and it brings up your service provider page, you can change modem settings, and can look and see what devices are connected to your modem for instance I use a galaxy note 4 phone as does my wife, it shows up as a galaxy phone connected to my WiFi, if I see an iPhone 6 connected to my modem I know someone is connected I don't want and it gives me the option to kick them off my network and also ban the device, same with computers or anything else. Like I said I don't know about the internet in Israel only America.

3 1,356
Reply
 08-01-2015, 09:24 AM
#11
User Info
Internet security is a little more important to me than the average person. If you'd like we can take it private and I can help you out if need be just shoot me a pm . I don't want to post it publicly.

3 1,356
Reply
 08-01-2015, 10:15 AM
#12
User Info
If you want to be paranoid, most routers allow you to do MAC address filtering. It can be broken, but it'll take a bit more work.

3 5,828
Reply
 08-01-2015, 10:42 AM
#13
  • ncguy1
  • TARHEEL
  • North Carolina
User Info
(08-01-2015, 10:15 AM)WegianWarrior Wrote: If you want to be paranoid, most routers allow you to do MAC address filtering. It can be broken, but it'll take a bit more work.

This is the method that I use as it only allows the specific items that I want to connect.

18 260
Reply
 08-02-2015, 06:46 AM
#14
User Info
I used to use MAC filtering, back when it was just me and the lovely bride and the number of WiFi devices could be counted on one hand (without using a thumb).  

Now the number count of WiFi devices exceeds twenty and registering MAC addresses isnt practical.  Plus, after working with my company's data security department for a number of years, the hard truth is: You cannot stop a dedicated intruder.  

The other truth is: There are so many unsecured wireless access ports broadcasting openly, even a relatively generic password makes it less likely for a ne'er-do-well to target you at random.  It will keep "Freddy the Freeloader" off your connection and more than likely provide you with the appropriate level of security for your residential needs.  

If you are running a home business, you should be investing in a "real" layer of security - a  mix of hardware and software.

8 240
Reply
 08-02-2015, 10:09 AM
#15
User Info
Justin, 
I am American actually,  I live in Israel now after a year and a half in Europe. Things are pretty much the same around the world, at least the free world.

You cannot periodically check who is connected to your router and kick them out and call it safe.  

If you are even at a point where you can see an unauthorized device connected to your network, it means the network password has been cracked.
Same for MAC filtering, a device must have a valid password before it can even present it's MAC address to the router.

It is like putting speed bumps in your hallway hoping that a potential intruder might trip on them. 

Back to square one, make sure the front door is locked - get the encryption solid (WPS disabled, WPA2, long password).
  
Hans, paranoia has nothing to do with these very basic topics, and using that word has the association of an unreasonable over reaction. 
I don't carry a firearm and the only time I had an issue with theft was when I left my wallet in my car and some punk put a brick through the window and stole it.
But someone in my building did get into my network, and it is every bit as bad, even worse.

Why? because who knows what that person was up to.

It could have been a punk that wanted to speed up his torrent download.
It could have been someone who wanted to learn more about me from my communications: am I going to attend a party? am I going on vacation? did my tax attorney send me some tax documents with my SSN all over them? 
It could have been a pervert that likes to download illegal content (you can figure out what)
It could have been a person that wanted to see if he can hack into a bank or attack a website.

All of those activities are illegal, criminal, and would have led the police straight to my doorstep and then I would have to prove that I have no idea about what was going on with the internet connection that for which am paying.

Or I can just save myself the trouble, spend 10 minutes and set up a password in all my devices that would be impossible for run-of-the-mill criminal to crack.

8 950
Reply
 08-02-2015, 10:21 AM
#16
User Info
(08-02-2015, 10:09 AM)Galhatz Wrote: Justin, 
I am American actually,  I live in Israel now after a year and a half in Europe. Things are pretty much the same around the world, at least the free world.

You cannot periodically check who is connected to your router and kick them out and call it safe.  

If you are even at a point where you can see an unauthorized device connected to your network, it means the network password has been cracked.
Same for MAC filtering, a device must have a valid password before it can even present it's MAC address to the router.

It is like putting speed bumps in your hallway hoping that a potential intruder might trip on them. 

Back to square one, make sure the front door is locked - get the encryption solid (WPS disabled, WPA2, long password).
  
Hans, paranoia has nothing to do with these very basic topics, and using that word has the association of an unreasonable over reaction. 
I don't carry a firearm and the only time I had an issue with theft was when I left my wallet in my car and some punk put a brick through the window and stole it.
But someone in my building did get into my network, and it is every bit as bad, even worse.

Why? because who knows what that person was up to.

It could have been a punk that wanted to speed up his torrent download.
It could have been someone who wanted to learn more about me from my communications: am I going to attend a party? am I going on vacation? did my tax attorney send me some tax documents with my SSN all over them? 
It could have been a pervert that likes to download illegal content (you can figure out what)
It could have been a person that wanted to see if he can hack into a bank or attack a website.

All of those activities are illegal, criminal, and would have led the police straight to my doorstep and then I would have to prove that I have no idea about what was going on with the internet connection that for which am paying.

Or I can just save myself the trouble, spend 10 minutes and set up a password in all my devices that would be impossible for run-of-the-mill criminal to crack.

I agree with you nothing wrong with being safe. I was just telling you a very basic thing that can be done to protect yourself. What people don't realize is just how much of their info is really online. Even if you didn't put it out there some things are still available. IMO its not being paranoid, and to have no protection thinking it won't happen to you is rolling the dice.

3 1,356
Reply
 08-02-2015, 11:07 PM
#17
  • Jovan
  • Banned
  • Traveling USA
User Info
I use to live in a retirement community.  Many of my neighbors routinely stole wifi as they use to work for companies like Verizon or ATT.  When ATT installed my wifi the installer told me which ones were the thiefs so he set up the password for me.  It was  24 characters long but no one broke it.  The above advice from Justin is excellent.

2 479
Reply
 08-30-2015, 06:32 PM
#18
  • naiyor
  • Active Member
  • Ontario, Canada
User Info
These are all good ways to secure. I'm glad to see discussion about MAC filtering. It is a great way to ensure that even if they do Crack the wpa key, they can't even access anyway.

0 392
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)