08-07-2015, 10:00 AM
#1
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I have co-worker who is very talented when it comes to building or making anything out of wood. He has various exotic woods that he uses in making pens and other projects. I'm thinking of asking him if he would be interested in making a brush handle for me but I wanted to ask you guys what type of wood is mostly used in shave brushes? Any particular way the wood should be sealed or treated before the knot is glued in? Thanks for any help.

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 08-07-2015, 10:04 AM
#2
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You may want to ask Brad Sears, an artisan here, as he mainly works with various types of wood:  http://shavenook.com/member.php?action=profile&uid=3531

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 08-07-2015, 10:08 AM
#3
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You could use any type of wood that you like orn appeals to you. They can all be made water resistant. Only thing j  would recommend and this may be overkill but I wouldn't soak any wood handle in water,rather just fill your cup or mug up high enough to soak the hair and leave the handle dry. As far as I know though as long as the wood is treated properly you should be gtg. I'm not an expert on wood though.

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 08-07-2015, 10:32 AM
#4
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With the right surface treatment any wood can do - but that is not the same as to say all wood is well suited. I would go for a dense, slow growing tree; fruit trees and the like makes wonderful knife handles and should be just the thing for a brush too.

An approach I've used in the past when getting a craft man to make things for me is to explain carefully what effect or 'feel' you wish for, then ask him how he would achieve it. Most of the time that works wonders Wink

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 08-07-2015, 11:25 AM
#5
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I have made several brushes.  I have used Cocobola, Spaulted Maple, Zebra, Chechen, Paduak, Canary, Lace, etc.  I have one in work using Red Oak.  I prefer to use hard woods since, for me, they finish better and are easy with which to work.  As mentioned above, just about any dense wood will work.  Finish with a good sealer and wax and it will last many years.  For sealing the wood, I use either Watco Danish Oil or Bartley's Clear Gel Coat.  I then finish with Minwood Paste Finishing Wax.  I set the knot with 5-Minute epoxy although I have read recently of folks using 100% Silicone (waterproof).  I am going to try the Silicone since the 5-Minute epoxy is some nasty stuff.  Over fill the knot hole and/or get some on the knot and your project is pretty well ruined.

BTW, I get knots from Whipped Dog, TGN, and Virginia Sheng to name a few in pure, best, mixed, and finest badger bristle.  Be warned....making your own brushes is addictive. Winky

Hope this helps. PM me if you care for some pictures/additional info.  I will help as much as I can.

Ed

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 08-07-2015, 11:56 AM
#6
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Thanks everyone for the quick and informative replies! I've looked at quite a few different styles to show him as examples and noted measurements when available. I like the looks of the Simpson Chubby's and it seems to be a simple design that he could easily make. Thanks again!

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 08-07-2015, 12:16 PM
#7
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Keep us updated. I'm not usually a fan of wood handles,however recently some of the work I've seen here on the nook has impressed me. If you get the right wood(looks wise) you can have a really nice brush.

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