08-14-2015, 11:59 AM
#1
  • SRNewb
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  • No. Va, USA
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Hi guys. I picked up what appears to be an old Rooney brush. It has a partial Rooney sticker that looks like it came loose and slipped down the handle a bit. It has good weight, and is IMO a high quality, lathe turned handle, every bit the quality of the handle on my Duke 2. I believe it to be genuine.
The glue bump at the base measures 22.44mm, and guesstimates with my caliper put the knot opening at Approximately 1mm larger.
It has turned a nice butterscotch over time. I know enough not to try polishing it out with polishing compound, thus ruining that butterscotch goodness, so I will soak it in hot tap water and some Dawn, and clean it well with a nice, soft cloth.
Here are a few pictures.

[Image: 100_2487.JPG]
[Image: 100_2489.JPG]
[Image: 100_2490.JPG]
[Image: 100_2491.JPG]

But, now to the 6 million dollar question, how do I remove the knot?
By this I mean that I plan to drill it out. But, from the weight of this handle I assume it is solid. In other words, I believe the floor that the knot rests on is solid, and most likely has not hollow area underneath.
How would I know when to stop drilling? I have done a few restores, but nothing like this brush handle.
I would greatly appreciate advise from anyone who has done a restore on Rooney, Simpson, any type of vintage handle similar to this. Also, any information on what model this is would also be appreciated.

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 08-14-2015, 01:18 PM
#2
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Can't help you on the model, but you are correct, the knot rests on solid resin down there. If you want to remove the knot (which other than needing a GOOD cleaning yours might be usable as-is) you'll want to cut it off as close to the neck as possible. I'll usually put some masking tape on as much of the handle as possible before proceeding. Not much protection but it's better than nothing. For removing the rest I prefer drilling a pilot hole as close to the center of the cut knot as possible and you can just go down until you notice the shavings changing from hair and glue to a hard plastic which is usually white. As long as you go really slow and use a very sharp bit you won't remove much material under the knot. Even if you do it can be filled easily with epoxy or something later on since you'll be putting a knot back in. Once you have a good pilot hole you can use pliers or I've had good luck with a small flat blade screwdriver to work my way around the drilled hole to break out the chunks of old hair. Just be really careful when you get near the edges so you don't mess up any of that pretty butterscotch!

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 08-14-2015, 01:30 PM
#3
  • SRNewb
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  • No. Va, USA
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Thanks, Nate! Much appreciated.

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 08-14-2015, 01:38 PM
#4
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You're very welcome, and post up some pictures when you are done!

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 08-14-2015, 03:28 PM
#5
  • SRNewb
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And, I believe I have saved this knot, or at least bought some use from it until I can afford a reknot.

Before


[Image: 100_2487.JPG]


After


[Image: 100_2493.JPG]
[Image: 100_2494.JPG]


Now, how I did it.
Originally, the knot looked small, narrow, like it had lost a ton of hair over the years. It was also quite stiff, and felt like I was pushing the palm of my hand into a bundle of straw.
Firstly, I lathered it 2 or 3 times with a very strong antibacterial soap. I did not want to soak it in a glass in a vinegar solution, as I was afraid the vinegar might contact the handle and somehow mare the butterscotch patina. After this I buffed it on a towel, ran it under a hot tap, shook it out and lathered it 3 or 4 times with shampoo. Once again, buffed dry on a towel.
It was a bit softer, but not to my liking.
The next part I do not recommend, but I figured I had nothing to lose. The knot was no good to me as it was.
I remember reading speculation that a certain grade of badger hair (super, or HMW?) might have the tips of the knots bleached.
Why not try that?
So I soaked the final third of the tips in bleach for 4 minutes, rinse, shampoo. Tips are getting a bit softer. Repeat for 3 more minutes. Rinse thoroughly, then lather with shampoo. I could feel the tips in the palm of my hand as I lathered. There was a remarkable difference in softness. 95% of the prickliness is gone. Rinse, shampoo again. Rinse and apply hair conditioner. Rinse thoroughly, buff vigorously on a towel, using circular as well as painting strokes. Comb out the knot, and buff some more. Finally using the palm of my hand to fluff out and shape the knot.
The above pics show the knot still in it's wet state. It is soft, with just a hint of prickle, IMO just the barest shade under the feel of my Simpson Duke 2 in Best. Density and backbone are very good as well, IMO.
I do not know what it will look like after it dries, but I'm very optimistic, and think with a few uses it may even get a bit better. Thanks for looking.

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 08-14-2015, 04:15 PM
#6
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I'm thinking of having the one I have re-knotted but I'm almost certain I'll ruin the handle. I'll try and find someone to do it for me. Great explanation on how to do it though.

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 08-14-2015, 09:12 PM
#7
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Send it to kent . They will reknot it Smile

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 08-14-2015, 09:34 PM
#8
  • SRNewb
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  • No. Va, USA
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Thanks, guys!
SimpsonLover, when the time comes, I'll re knot it. I doubt I could afford Kent's price. Smile
Besides, my way's more fun!

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 08-17-2015, 06:49 PM
#9
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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Bored out the knot today. 22mm hole.

[Image: 100_2500.JPG]

I have ordered a 20mm TGN Silvertip Standard.
From what I've read this knot has a bt more scritch than their Finest, but scritch or prickliness is a non issue for me. For one I don't mind a bit of it, and two, I bowl lather, so the brush is not spending as much time on my face.
Besides, I have 2 brushes in Finest, and one in the Finest F2. I think it's time to try something else in their line.
I'll set the knot with silicone, and if it doesn't suit me it will be easy to pop it out and order something else, possibly their Silvertip Grade A, which is hear is an excellent knot.

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 08-17-2015, 07:17 PM
#10
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Mike that looks like a job well done.

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 08-17-2015, 08:03 PM
#11
  • SRNewb
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Thanks, Hector!

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 08-20-2015, 05:37 PM
#12
  • SRNewb
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Recieved my Silvertip Standard knot from TGN earlier today. Nicely stuffed with Silvertip badger hair. I have read on several forums that this knot was prickly, scritchy, etc.
I have to say that I do not detect any of this in the one I have. To me it is nice and soft, comparable to their Finest in this regard, but with quite a bit less backbone. I set the knot at 50mm initially, using low temp hot glue. After the hot glue was well set, I soaked the knot in cold water for 5 or 10 minutes, then gave it a try on the old cheeks, using circular motions as well as painting strokes. Lovely soft, but too much flop. Popped the knot out, bored down 2mm, and reset with hot glue at 48mm. Much better. nice and soft, with a decent backbone for my tastes. Popped the knot out, cleared out the glue and let everything dry a couple of hours, and set with epoxy. In 24 hours,  it will get it's lathering debut.
Thanks for looking.

[Image: 100_2504.JPG]

[Image: 100_2505.JPG]

[Image: 100_2506.JPG][Image: 100_2507.JPG]

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 08-20-2015, 06:15 PM
#13
  • blzrfn
  • Butterscotch Bandit
  • Vancouver USA
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Well done, it looks great

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 08-20-2015, 06:51 PM
#14
  • SRNewb
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  • No. Va, USA
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Thanks, blzrfn!

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