08-15-2015, 09:39 AM
#1
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Over time I have come to appreciate a good shaving soap like a good wine, in some respects my love of wine tasting I think has helped me appreciate a good soap prior to even lathering it up and using it.

For those that don't know the art of wine tasting it is quite a simple one, one I learnt over the last few years. Basically you pour the wine, you observe its structure and colour, you swirl and smell it and then you take that first mouthful, larger than your average mouthful. Filling your mouth with the tastes, smells and textures, after swallowing you take note of the after taste and the longevity of mouth feel. Once this is done you relax down and enjoy the wine for what it is.

This process has stirred a strange connection with shaving soaps and has made me appreciate them more as works of art rather than just soap. For instance, when I first receive a soap, I observe the packaging and if it well finished I expect this of the soap. Once the lid has been removed I will take a quick second to look at the make up of the soap and I may peruse the ingredients. Next I will take a few big intakes of the scent through my nose and see what I can detect, in most cases instantly I will know if this soap is going to be for me but if you throw a spanner in the works such as some of the Barrister and Mann scents you have a real job of picking out many complex notes. I will bloom the soap prior to using it and give it another whiff, I will try to detect any change in the scent and pick out maybe more notes that were not apparent at first. Once lathered I will put it on my face for the first time I will let it sit a minute, I will observe any changes that take place and without thinking grade the quality of the lather. I will then settle and enjoy the shave - or maybe I won't! Last but not least the post shave is an important time to reflect on the performance and gauge the quality of the post shave feel.

My taste in wine very much reflects my choice in soaps. French wines bore me, they may taste good but the labels and one grape varieties do not excite me. Wines from exciting regions like Paso Robles in California arouse me with bold scents and mixes of grape varieties and just down right outrageously cool label designs. Mitchell's Wool Fat is just like a French wine it maybe a cracking soap but it's boring, I like the outgoing scents of the new artisans with strong aromas and just as good if not better performance than the old world soaps.

It's sometimes strange the connections we make! So, what connections have you made? Please share or if your a normal person and not slightly mad like me then I hope you enjoyed my strange connection.

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 08-15-2015, 10:15 AM
#2
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(08-15-2015, 09:39 AM)Windsor Citrus Wrote: Over time I have come to appreciate a good shaving soap like a good wine, in some respects my love of wine tasting I think has helped me appreciate a good soap prior to even lathering it up and using it.

For those that don't know the art of wine tasting it is quite a simple one, one I learnt over the last few years. Basically you pour the wine, you observe its structure and colour, you swirl and smell it and then you take that first mouthful, larger than your average mouthful. Filling your mouth with the tastes, smells and textures, after swallowing you take note of the after taste and the longevity of mouth feel. Once this is done you relax down and enjoy the wine for what it is.

This process has stirred a strange connection with shaving soaps and has made me appreciate them more as works of art rather than just soap. For instance, when I first receive a soap, I observe the packaging and if it well finished I expect this of the soap. Once the lid has been removed I will take a quick second to look at the make up of the soap and I may peruse the ingredients. Next I will take a few big intakes of the scent through my nose and see what I can detect, in most cases instantly I will know if this soap is going to be for me but if you throw a spanner in the works such as some of the Barrister and Mann scents you have a real job of picking out many complex notes. I will bloom the soap prior to using it and give it another whiff, I will try to detect any change in the scent and pick out maybe more notes that were not apparent at first. Once lathered I will put it on my face for the first time I will let it sit a minute, I will observe any changes that take place and without thinking grade the quality of the lather. I will then settle and enjoy the shave - or maybe I won't! Last but not least the post shave is an important time to reflect on the performance and gauge the quality of the post shave feel.

My taste in wine very much reflects my choice in soaps. French wines bore me, they may taste good but the labels and one grape varieties do not excite me. Wines from exciting regions like Paso Robles in California arouse me with bold scents and mixes of grape varieties and just down right outrageously cool label designs. Mitchell's Wool Fat is just like a French wine it maybe a cracking soap but it's boring, I like the outgoing scents of the new artisans with strong aromas and just as good if not better performance than the old world soaps.

It's sometimes strange the connections we make! So, what connections have you made? Please share or if your a normal person and not slightly mad like me then I hope you enjoyed my strange connection.
Oli I love the connection..!! My wife and are going to Paso Robles in the spring as we have friends who own a winery.  Any requests I can send you?

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 08-15-2015, 11:40 AM
#3
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(08-15-2015, 10:15 AM)Nevada Red Wrote: Oli I love the connection..!! My wife and are going to Paso Robles in the spring as we have friends who own a winery.  Any requests I can send you?

Enjoy my friend, I love all wines but I am a big fan of some of the really 'out there' different wines from either Chronic Cellars (which is available in limited supply in the UK) or Cypher Winery (impossible to get in the UK). I like them because they are different and modern in their approach.


If you happen to swing past Cypher at any time then there Anarchy wine is of great interest to me. I tried a taste from a friend who collects wine but it's just not feasible for me to pay to have it sent to the UK.

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 08-15-2015, 12:03 PM
#4
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(08-15-2015, 11:40 AM)Windsor Citrus Wrote:
(08-15-2015, 10:15 AM)Nevada Red Wrote: Oli I love the connection..!! My wife and are going to Paso Robles in the spring as we have friends who own a winery.  Any requests I can send you?

Enjoy my friend, I love all wines but I am a big fan of some of the really 'out there' different wines from either Chronic Cellars (which is available in limited supply in the UK) or Cypher Winery (impossible to get in the UK). I like them because they are different and modern in their approach.


If you happen to swing past Cypher at any time then there Anarchy wine is of great interest to me. I tried a taste from a friend who collects wine but it's just not feasible for me to pay to have it sent to the UK.
Oli no problem, I'll save this thread and when we go I'll make a detour.

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 08-15-2015, 12:16 PM
#5
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(08-15-2015, 12:03 PM)Nevada Red Wrote:
(08-15-2015, 11:40 AM)Windsor Citrus Wrote:
(08-15-2015, 10:15 AM)Nevada Red Wrote: Oli I love the connection..!! My wife and are going to Paso Robles in the spring as we have friends who own a winery.  Any requests I can send you?

Enjoy my friend, I love all wines but I am a big fan of some of the really 'out there' different wines from either Chronic Cellars (which is available in limited supply in the UK) or Cypher Winery (impossible to get in the UK). I like them because they are different and modern in their approach.


If you happen to swing past Cypher at any time then there Anarchy wine is of great interest to me. I tried a taste from a friend who collects wine but it's just not feasible for me to pay to have it sent to the UK.
Oli no problem, I'll save this thread and when we go I'll make a detour.

If you do that would be amazing, but please do not go out of your way. Enjoy your trip.

Enjoying a Glass of Chronic Cellars at the moment.
[Image: 3TOajpe.jpg]

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 08-15-2015, 12:21 PM
#6
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(08-15-2015, 12:16 PM)Windsor Citrus Wrote:
(08-15-2015, 12:03 PM)Nevada Red Wrote:
(08-15-2015, 11:40 AM)Windsor Citrus Wrote: Enjoy my friend, I love all wines but I am a big fan of some of the really 'out there' different wines from either Chronic Cellars (which is available in limited supply in the UK) or Cypher Winery (impossible to get in the UK). I like them because they are different and modern in their approach.


If you happen to swing past Cypher at any time then there Anarchy wine is of great interest to me. I tried a taste from a friend who collects wine but it's just not feasible for me to pay to have it sent to the UK.
Oli no problem, I'll save this thread and when we go I'll make a detour.

If you do that would be amazing, but please do not go out of your way. Enjoy your trip.

Enjoying a Glass of Chronic Cellars at the moment.
[Image: 3TOajpe.jpg]
Outstanding..!! That does look "unique" :-) 
Is it more like a Cab, Merlot, Malbec??

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 08-15-2015, 12:40 PM
#7
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It is unique and different. Here's the label for your browsing. This is relatively affordable in the UK at about £12 a bottle. 
[Image: dcNFrSU.jpg]

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 08-15-2015, 12:44 PM
#8
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(08-15-2015, 12:40 PM)Windsor Citrus Wrote: It is unique and different. Here's the label for your browsing. This is relatively affordable in the UK at about £12 a bottle. 
[Image: dcNFrSU.jpg]
Very nice.  I'm more a Merlot and Cab guy but my wife would really like this.  Stopped drinking three years ago but so often I still enjoy a really nice red.  Thanks for the label Oli

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 08-15-2015, 01:00 PM
#9
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(08-15-2015, 12:44 PM)Nevada Red Wrote:
(08-15-2015, 12:40 PM)Windsor Citrus Wrote: It is unique and different. Here's the label for your browsing. This is relatively affordable in the UK at about £12 a bottle. 
[Image: dcNFrSU.jpg]
Very nice.  I'm more a Merlot and Cab guy but my wife would really like this.  Stopped drinking three years ago but so often I still enjoy a really nice red.  Thanks for the label Oli

It's quite a red fruity tasting wine with a very jammy texture. It does have some chocolatey/vanilla undertones that make it slightly richer. I would say it has a very slight sweet element that some people may not enjoy. Have a great evening.

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 08-15-2015, 01:24 PM
#10
  • Johnny
  • MODERATOR EMERITUS
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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Give me my MWF and a tea glass full of Mogen David and I'm set. Smile

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 08-15-2015, 01:46 PM
#11
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(08-15-2015, 01:24 PM)Johnny Wrote: Give me my MWF and a tea glass full of Mogen David and I'm set. Smile

Shield of David wines, never tried it but heard of it. They do a popular fortified wine I believe?!

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 08-15-2015, 02:31 PM
#12
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(08-15-2015, 09:39 AM)Windsor Citrus Wrote: My taste in wine very much reflects my choice in soaps. French wines bore me, they may taste good but the labels and one grape varieties do not excite me. Wines from exciting regions like Paso Robles in California arouse me with bold scents and mixes of grape varieties and just down right outrageously cool label designs. Mitchell's Wool Fat is just like a French wine it maybe a cracking soap but it's boring, I like the outgoing scents of the new artisans with strong aromas and just as good if not better performance than the old world soaps.

It's sometimes strange the connections we make! So, what connections have you made? Please share or if your a normal person and not slightly mad like me then I hope you enjoyed my strange connection.

One connection I have made is that if the words “Paso Robles” are on the bottle, then the bottle will remain on the shelf — somebody else’s shelf, certainly not mine.  I like jamminess in a jar of strawberry jam; I do not like jamminess in my wine glass.  In the same vein, if a soap (not just a shaving soap) knocks one backward with a thick purple cloud of lavender, detectable in the next room, then I quickly will retreat to a room further removed from the offender than the next room.  

My bride and I enjoy a glass or two of red wine — the first duty of any wine is to be red — every evening; the two of us generally consume two 750 ml bottles of wine per three days.  For our daily drinkers, we tend to favor northern Italian reds, specifically sturdy Barbera wines, which are dry without being harsh; the best known Barberas come from the communes of Asti and Alba, but there are some tremendous bargains from Oltrepo Pavese, which, very roughly translated, means “the wrong side of the tracks of Padua" where the tracks are the Po River.  If we could afford it, we would drink Sagrantino di Montefalco, an Umbrian wine with an astoundingly high polyphenol content, every night, but that kind of consumption would quickly exhaust our bank accounts.  Sagrantino is the MdC or LPL or AdP of wines, with prices to match.  

Which brings me to the real connection between wine and shaving soap in my conscious and subconscious mind:  the price/unit glass (pun is unintentional) ceiling.  Because we drink wine every day, we are constantly seek the Holy Grail of wine, the great sub-$10 bottle of wine.  One is more likely to encounter a unicorn than a great sub-$10 bottle of wine, but the quest continues.  In the meantime, we generally spend about $8/bottle for Oltrepo Pavese Barbera, and it is a very good (somewhat short of great) and quaffable beverage.  Any wine that sells above the $15 level had darn well be really good, or the occasion (as opposed to the wine itself) had better overwhelm my strong resistance to >$15 bottles of wine, for me to make the expenditure.

Similarly:  shaving soaps.  I have spent over $15 for a single puck of soap only once in my life, and I do not look forward to spending more than $15 for another in the future, not when there are really excellent soaps selling at $9.91 (Celestino will recognize that price point) and under $8 (Haslinger Schafmilch), some of which (Provence Santé Green Tea, I am thinking of you) have scents superior to the >$50 shaving soaps from designer fashion houses.

That $15 price barrier carries right across the chasm between wine and shaving soap.

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 08-16-2015, 12:25 AM
#13
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(08-15-2015, 01:46 PM)Windsor Citrus Wrote:
(08-15-2015, 01:24 PM)Johnny Wrote: Give me my MWF and a tea glass full of Mogen David and I'm set. Smile

Shield of David wines, never tried it but heard of it. They do a popular fortified wine I believe?!

20/20......Not to be confused with the ABC news reports of the same name....!!!
IMHO....I find BOTH a bit "hard to swallow"......!!Wink

Close shaves should SOOTHE ya...NOT SCARE ya!!

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 08-16-2015, 10:04 AM
#14
  • kav
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  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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I'm on a roadtrip in Paso Robles and beyond with a willowy blonde named Anne. We were shopping for the holidays buying wine, olive oil and cheeses from the many producers. We walked into a winery and I notice a oddly familiar man leaning over the counter mid conversation. Clerk '
'your accent? you aren't from around here.NO, I am Breetish. Uh, where's that?' I interject; the United Kingdom, England. Clerk looks puzzled 
still and turns to another couple. Man turns around. It's actor Allan Rickman extending his hand.  Mr Rickman! I saw you at the Globe in Richard III- enjoyed your performance. He pauses with his trademark look of shock and thanks me as we make introductions. We talk wine, decent places to eat heading south and leave together with several bottles of wine in boxes. He does another double take at my car; MGA twin cam coupe in BRG with RHD and a picnic basket strapped to the boot. Anne gets in showing @ 3' of nylons. Allan has some GM bathtub rental. 'Uh, Chris uh, good on you'. We drive out waving goodbyes.
Two weeks later I'm with Anne in a Malibu restaurant with maître de who gave us a lousy table by the kitchen door. He hurries over, apologetic and ushers us to a table with a view of the ocean. There's a bottle of champagne. I look around and Allan is in some Hollywierd power lunch with
a fleshy producer who looks like Sydney Greenstreet sweating in spite of the AC. He smiles, raises his glass, nods his head at Sydney and rolls his eyes. 
We can talk wines, our preferences, price breaks et al. the key factor is  SHARING IT.

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 08-16-2015, 11:04 AM
#15
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I agree, sharing wine is the best bit about wine.

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 08-17-2015, 01:38 PM
#16
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Bayside, NY
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(08-15-2015, 01:24 PM)Johnny Wrote: Give me my MWF and a tea glass full of Mogen David and I'm set. Smile

Laughing1 That's funny, Johnny! Reminds me of the time long, long ago when my Dad was POd at something my kid brother did. Dad was not a drinker (his idea of a drink was a whiskey sour), but he felt the need to calm his nerves with some liquid calming agent. Dad went to the cabinet, pulled out the bottle of Manischewitz Malaga, and poured himself a stiff one. Have you ever tasted that stuff? It's 50% grapes, 50% sugar. Gag me!

However I'm in total accord with the MWF  Sbathroom_grooming_shaving_100-100

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