09-08-2015, 11:44 AM
#1
  • Scoti
  • Member
  • Ontario, Canada
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For those of you that hone razors, I've got a little success story for you.

When looking through the forums regarding barber hones most people see them touted as touch up hones to keep an edge going until it's time for re-honing. Even if you look at the instructions on the barber hones most say 4-6 strokes and then strop on clean leather. These hones work wonderfully for that purpose. Recently I thought why can't I hone a razor start to finish (after bevel set) on a dual sided barber hone? Do I have to stick to 4-6 strokes?

Where I am coming from is people say it is easy to over hone on a barber hone. Yes that may be true if you are touching up a shave ready razor but what about sharpening and then polishing one that isn't shave ready? Would it over hone in 4-6 strokes? No it will not. They may be fast cutting abrasives but they are glazed which greatly impedes there "grits" ability to cut material.

Honemeisters say it is super hard to over hone an edge and that you would need to stay on a low grit hone and use pressure and circles to produce an over honed edge. I believe it unless your technique is horrible and you're really pushing down on the razor. I think most people are really afraid to over hone so they don't hone enough and it leaves the edge dull. I know I used to be afraid of over honing... then you wonder if you're blade is dull because you over honed. Haha yea ok..

Now on to the success story Smile

Today I set a bevel on a vintage Keen Kutter. It was a smiling blade so I was using rolling x strokes. I went directly from my 1k water stone to my dual sided Keen Kutter Kombination barber hone. After that I went directly to the strop and I am now sporting a super smooth and clean shaven face. The aftershave had some burn to it but that dissipated within a few seconds. I had little irritation on my neck that lasted all of 2 minutes.  That could partially be due to the fact that I've been messing around with a new soap and don't know it yet, not sure. As I'm not a big fan of pastes and sprays I can say it was a nice shave for under 20 minutes of work. I am working on the repeatability of the process but to get a great shave off a hone "unfit" to hone straight razors is a joy.

Just trying to get a little straight razor love going on at the shave nook.

Cheers,
Scott

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 09-08-2015, 11:59 AM
#2
User Info
I'm from the school of thought that says you cannot over hone a edge This is a area that can cause a bit of a debate amongst the honing fraternity, personally I don't beleive you can over hone a razor on the higher grit finishing stones especially if you hone with a taped spine and the razors geometry is good, because once your razor reaches it's optimal level of sharpness all you are really doing by keeping going is reproducing what's already there that's where experience and a good loupe comes in handy knowing when to stop is your problem, here's a interesting article you may want to have a little read through if you are interested in edge maintenace.


https://jendeindustries.wordpress.com/20...rs-part-1/

http://straightrazorplace.com/honing/106...sting.html

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 09-08-2015, 01:25 PM
#3
  • Scoti
  • Member
  • Ontario, Canada
User Info
I took a read of the article at SRP and it has interesting theories in it.

 I was just glad to get an awesome edge using something men before my time would have used. To get an edge that wasn't over honed because I used more then 4-6 strokes.

All in all a barber hone is a really cool tool to have on hand and they can be picked up cheap. I may be selling my other stones and sticking with the trusty barber hone ... Hahah yea right.

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 09-09-2015, 03:48 AM
#4
  • Steve56
  • Senior Member
  • Knoxville, TN
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I am also of the "can't overhone" school of thought. What you can do is produce a fin or foil edge on aggressive stones if you spend too much time on one side and/or use pressure. And some stones are worse than others about producing such an edge, which will break off with stropping or shaving and yield less than ideal shaves.

I think this is what they're really talking about.

Cheers, Steve

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 09-09-2015, 08:57 AM
#5
  • Entasis
  • Atop the Razor's Edge
  • Southern California
User Info
Although I'm early in my honing learning, I love it when I do hone, and love it even more when achieve a good result! Thanks for the articles on overhoning.

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