07-04-2012, 07:02 AM
#1
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I recently started paying attention to how much tea and coffee I drink through an average day. I realized that it had really got out of hand.

I was consuming between 3-5 mugs of coffee and 10-20 cups of tea in any given day. Way too much.

So, I decided to cut down on my tea/coffee consumption. The plan was to drink no more than two cups of tea/coffee combined.

It's been a week now, and I've held to that limit so far. No regrets really - I didn't feel strange or bad at all. I started consuming plain water through the day instead, and that makes me feel better, I think.

I hope I can keep it up for a long time. Biggrin

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 07-04-2012, 07:06 AM
#2
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Drinking a minimum of half your body weight (pounds) in ounces of water would help many people more than they can imagine. For every ounce of tea/coffee/soda one drinks just add te same amount of water to counteract. Congrats Yohann.

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 07-04-2012, 07:10 AM
#3
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Good job cutting down on the caffeine! I just cut out mostly all of my soda intake last year and I feel much better drinking water instead.

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 07-04-2012, 07:11 AM
#4
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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My five to six pots of coffee per day takes five to six pots of water to make.

Send me your coffee.Smile

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 07-04-2012, 07:15 AM
#5
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Yep, my doc concurs with Johnny - according to him, Tea and Coffee are perfectly legitimate sources of water. However, he was concerned about my consumption of caffeine and also this was causing teeth staining in my case. I don't like stained teeth, so this was another reason to cut it down.

Johnny- My wife is the main coffee drinker in the house (now), so no coffee for you. I just bought some really nice locally roasted beans too.

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 07-04-2012, 07:18 AM
#6
  • Dave
  • Moderator Emeritus
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When I worked in TV, I drank about 15 cups of coffee a day. When I went elsewhere I drank 3-4 cups a day. Now that I work at home, I drink 1 cup a day with my wife in the morning. I have also cut my sodas down to about 4 per week. I drink mostly water with some Sweet Tea at dinner. I just can't drink water with a meal so the only time I drink anything caffeinated is at a meal. Congrats Yohann, thats quite an accomplishment

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 07-04-2012, 08:14 AM
#7
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(07-04-2012, 07:15 AM)yohannrjm Wrote: Yep, my doc concurs with Johnny - according to him, Tea and Coffee are perfectly legitimate sources of water. However, he was concerned about my consumption of caffeine and also this was causing teeth staining in my case. I don't like stained teeth, so this was another reason to cut it down.

Johnny- My wife is the main coffee drinker in the house (now), so no coffee for you. I just bought some really nice locally roasted beans too.

This is completely inaccurate. Your body cannot utilize the water that is found in tea/coffee/beer etc like it needs to with plain water. Those other drinks while being made of primarily water actually have a dehydrating effect on the body. That is plain & simple physiology. Don't get me wrong, I love my coffee. I just drink more water to counteract its dehydrating effects. I drink approximately a gallon (128 oz) of plain water per day.

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 07-04-2012, 08:19 AM
#8
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Brian - You're probably right with regard to Coffee, however I've read articles that claim that Tea hydrates just like water, as the electrolyte content in tea is insignificant. In fact, the papers indicate that tea may be slightly better than water for hydrating purposes as it does have a light content of other stuff. The issue is the relative electrolyte content in the beverage and your body, not the absolute amount.

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 07-04-2012, 08:24 AM
#9
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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My wife says Dr. Oz says I can have my coffee, so that's good enough for me.

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 07-04-2012, 08:36 AM
#10
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Healthy and admirable, Yohann, but no fun.

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 07-04-2012, 08:41 AM
#11
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I've yet to read anything saying that tea hydrates "like" water. I'd be interested to read what you're referring to. A PM w/ links would be appreciated. While electrolytes are very important, drinks like Gatorade/Powerade have perverted this info a bit. Anything caffeinated will have a dehydrating effect on the body, and yes even most decaffeinated teas still have some caffeine. Caffeine constricts blood vessels thus diminishing the amount of surface area available available for the transport out of the blood vessel & into the cell where it's needed. With less transport into the cell you end up having more water reaching the kidneys making you urinate that water out before it even has a chance to be of benefit to the body. I'll look forward to reading this new information to determine if their methods and conclusions "hold water"! Cheesy pun completely intended. Winky

(07-04-2012, 08:19 AM)yohannrjm Wrote: Brian - You're probably right with regard to Coffee, however I've read articles that claim that Tea hydrates just like water, as the electrolyte content in tea is insignificant. In fact, the papers indicate that tea may be slightly better than water for hydrating purposes as it does have a light content of other stuff. The issue is the relative electrolyte content in the beverage and your body, not the absolute amount.

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 07-04-2012, 09:38 AM
#12
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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I too have been consuming too much coffee and really need to cut down my caffeine intake and drink more water. This thread has spurred me to try and limit my intake to two cups of coffee a day (and to drink more water). We'll see how it goes.

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 07-04-2012, 09:52 AM
#13
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Brian -

It's been a while since I looked up the research articles, but there are a few news articles that come up if you search for 'tea hydration' on Google.

Here's one: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-...rated.html.

I also picked up a number - it seems that you need to consume about 400 mg of caffeine before you start seeing a diuretic effect. It takes quite a lot of tea/coffee to get to that point.

Being an athlete (biker) myself, I'd advise people to avoid Gator/Powerade, as they're too sweet (making you consume less liquid than you should). However, you do need electrolytes as you sweat - you lose electrolytes along with water, and just drinking water makes you lose even more electrolytes and makes you even more thirsty.

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 07-04-2012, 12:32 PM
#14
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Congrats Yohann. We can easily develop habits over a period of time but changing them can be a challenge. Sounds like you have found a good balance for yourself.

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 07-04-2012, 02:30 PM
#15
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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(07-04-2012, 09:52 AM)yohannrjm Wrote: Being an athlete (biker) myself, I'd advise people to avoid Gator/Powerade, as they're too sweet (making you consume less liquid than you should). However, you do need electrolytes as you sweat - you lose electrolytes along with water, and just drinking water makes you lose even more electrolytes and makes you even more thirsty.

Hi Yohann

I wholeheartedly agree with you on that statement and came to that exact same conclusion shortly after my first London Marathon.

The London Marathon (and I'm guessing other big marathons are setup the same) drink stations are set up so:
  • First drink station is at 3 miles. Water only.
  • Drink stations are then every mile. Either water only or see below.
  • At drink stations 10, 15, 20 & 25 miles there are "energy/sport" drinks available.
Drinking water is a lot! more important than drinking "energy/sport" drinks. The "energy/sport" drinks serve a purpose (as you noted), but water should take centre stage...

Take care, Mike

Edit: Fixed grammar.

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 07-04-2012, 09:02 PM
#16
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I know that I drink way too much coffee. My routine is to finish off a 12 cup pot before I leave to the office, and then brew another 8 cups to bring with me.

Once I get home I typically drink sweet tea or juice. If I drink a glass of water per day, that it a lot.

My doctor is all over me to cut back on my caffeine intact, but it is hard. I am not a morning person at all, so it takes that pot of coffee and 90 minutes of "waking up" just to get the juices flowing to get ready for work.

I know if I would cut back it would help with my weight as well, as I drink my coffee with heavy cream and 3 heaping teaspoons of sugar.

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 07-05-2012, 12:00 AM
#17
  • Persius
  • On the learning curve
  • Reading, England
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Having given up caffeine was a great help when it came time to quit smoking (10 years & counting). The up / down effect of two drugs (nicotine & caffeine) was way too much for me and trying to become an ex-smoker was always a problem because sometimes I couldn't tell if my body was craving a cigarette or a coffee. When I was faced with just one withdrawal at a time I found it much easier to deal with.

I also find that when I'm training (running) I prefer not to drink tea & coffee as I am sure they affect performance, plus it prompts you to take on a lot more water when you're not consuming tea / coffee.

Over here, we are always told that tea and coffee do count as part of your fluid intake for the day, but I do know that tea is mildly diuretic. I guess that the induced loss of fluid is compensated for by the volume of water in the teat itself? Perhaps some of our medic members could enlighten us?

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 07-05-2012, 04:34 AM
#18
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Congrats on the realization, Yohann. There is no better substitute for water.

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 07-05-2012, 05:32 PM
#19
  • greyhawk
  • Senior Member
  • Southern California
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We've all been told for years that we should drink 8 glasses of water every day, but I always found this to be counterintuitive. Our bodies have a thirst reflex. We should drink when we are thirsty--with two caveats: 1) during heavy exercise (especially when it's hot), we can "outrun" that reflex, so by the time we feel thirsty we are already dehydrated, and 2) as we get older, that reflex doesn't work as well. So, in those instances, it is certainly prudent to drink before we feel thirsty.

I find that if I drink a lot more water, it simply goes through my system a lot faster and I spend more time in the bathroom. For the last 20 years, there has been a proliferation of water bottles being carried around by everyone. I think the whole obsession with staying hydrated was promulgated by water companies. How did everyone survive before that? Tongue

I definitely agree that drinking too much coffee and/or tea is not good, and a higher percentage of our liquid intake should be water (as with most things in life, moderation is the key). I disagree, however, that we need to drink as much water as has been hammered into us. It won't hurt (as long as you don't overdo it), but it also doesn't help the way many people think it does.

Exhibit 1: research by two scientists from the University of Pennsylvania:
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/...03993.html

Exhibit 2: research by a physiology professor from Dartmouth:
http://www.scientificamerican.com/articl...er-per-day

And another interesting article:
http://www.reuters.com/article/2008/04/0...9720080402

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 07-05-2012, 06:37 PM
#20
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Drinking too much coffee is definitely not a good thing. At one place I worked, people would come in dead tired and drink lots of coffee. Oh, it got them wide awake, but not in a productive manner. They became amped-out zombies, kind of like angry Cornholios. It resulted in a number of very ugly confrontations.

I used to drink more coffee than I should, but solved the problem by getting more sleep. Eight hours sleep + less coffee + more water = a healthier and more productive person. Sufficient sleep negates the need for excessive amounts of caffeine.

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