11-12-2015, 02:13 AM
#1
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If you had the choice as a soap maker to color your product, would you?

I tend to think of the additives such as micas, titanium dioxide, or color powders derived of iron oxides.

This is something that confuses me. This was one reason I refrained from purchasing Soap Commander for such a long time. It still has yet to be used but it just doesn't seem to click with me on why it is needed.

Share your thoughts please gentlemen.

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 11-12-2015, 03:21 AM
#2
  • VTMAX
  • Banned
  • Woodstock, Vermont
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God no. I used the beautiful colors back in the 90's when the London creams and soaps were all we had. Occasionally I would break out which totally stopped when I got away from them. Not a fan of coloring creams/soaps.

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 11-12-2015, 03:23 AM
#3
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Money made in soaps, how much a soap manufacturer can sell of his product is largely dependant on the variety that is offered.

Besides that, I wonder if the powder used is detrimental to building  lather.

We have a long culture of watching beer bubbles here in bavaria, and by that experience  I do suspect any contamination of the raw materials results in a lesser lather, and faster decay of the bubbles
Sisi

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 11-12-2015, 03:27 AM
#4
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I had a tub of GFT Rose that had a strong red coloring. It stained the brushes for a few good days every time after I used it.
I don't see the point behind it and I would refrain from buying a colored cream/soap unless there is a compelling reason to do so, such as outstanding scent of performance (which the GFT, btw, lacked).

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 11-12-2015, 05:54 AM
#5
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I would say no, I would not be swayed to buy a soap because of the color.   Galhatz makes a great point, I use a white horse hair brush most of the time so I don't need it stained.

So in my personal opinion vendors - leave the color out.

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 11-12-2015, 06:19 AM
#6
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It isn't needed, it is a marketing gimmick. I don't like it either.

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 11-12-2015, 06:37 AM
#7
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On the whole, colorants in shaving agents are definite deal-breakers for me. 
However, I don't mind so much optical brighteners, like mica or titanium oxide. 
A paucity of forms of iron oxide, judiciously used, as in C&S 88, are borderline acceptable to me.

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 11-12-2015, 07:13 AM
#8
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I completely avoid colouring in any product, as much as I can and that is why I stay away from any soap that has colouring, or any harsh synthetic compounds, in general.
I don't mind plain-looking soap, and as long as it works, that is what is most important! Shy

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 11-12-2015, 07:57 AM
#9
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I have been using Barrister and Mann Lavanille soap for the past week, and although it does not have any dyes in it, the brownness of the vanilla leads to a cappuccino colored lather, that is a bit weird. DR Harris Rose cream stained my brush pink for several days, so I was not a fan of its obnoxious pink dye. On the other hand, Vulfix Lavender cream has a strange blue and grey dye that seems very off for a lavender scented product, but I had no issues with brush staining or colored lather, so I didn't care.

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 11-12-2015, 08:00 AM
#10
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I have no use for dye in my shaving soap or clay.

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 11-12-2015, 09:17 AM
#11
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Many fragrances contain some percentage of vanilla, and discolors to brown or tan without any coloring having been added.

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 11-12-2015, 10:06 AM
#12
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Michelle, wouldnt one use a vanilla stabilizer in the soap to avoid that issue?  But again... the stabilizer itself may not be the best thing to include in a soap, health wise.

I personally do not bother adding any color. If I purchase a soap, if the performance is good I really dont care what it looks like. Colored or not. Palmolive sticks COULD be white, but they are not. They still remain a great value.

I wonder why some soap makers who insist on color do not use more natural products? Some clays will add a very nice color. They are not as bad as most think in a shaving soap providing small quantities are used. Some other items that could be used and may provide skin benefits: coffee, beet root powder, carrots, green tea powder, powered calendula flowers, etc.

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 11-12-2015, 10:41 AM
#13
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You could use vanilla stabilizer if you didn't want the discoloration, or you can just accept that some of your soaps will be brown.  There are many lovely colors that can be obtained with clays and herbal coloring materials but the palette is somewhat limited.  And not all plant-based colorants are light/alkaline stable.  That's what I used when I started making soap but I've added oxides and ultramarines to get some true blues and greens to play with in my bar soap.

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 11-12-2015, 11:37 AM
#14
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(11-12-2015, 10:06 AM)crenedecotret Wrote: ...may provide skin benefits: coffee, beet root powder, carrots, green tea powder, powered calendula flowers, etc.
Not sure how significant the benefit would be though, given the small concentration and that it's essentially washed away after the shave.

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 11-12-2015, 12:00 PM
#15
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The same could probably be said about any extra that is sometimes added to soaps (shaving or otherwise), like shea butter, etc. They dont remain on the skin for that long. Beyond the basic recipe now found on many forums (stearic acid, coconut oil, KOH), the rest is pretty much just tweaking/experimentaiton. Some additive may be great for one person, not as much for the next... classic YMMV here.

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 11-12-2015, 12:46 PM
#16
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(11-12-2015, 12:00 PM)crenedecotret Wrote: The same could probably be said about any extra that is sometimes added to soaps (shaving or otherwise), like shea butter, etc. They dont remain on the skin for that long. Beyond the basic recipe now found on many forums (stearic acid, coconut oil, KOH), the rest is pretty much just tweaking/experimentaiton. Some additive may be great for one person, not as much for the next... classic YMMV here.


Are you sure about this? Aren't certain additives like shea butter or other oils that are added afterwards absorbed into the skin?

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 11-12-2015, 12:49 PM
#17
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
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Anything to add interest. I like the colored creams, rose, lavender,violet, but I don't have any sensitivity issues, as my wife is always pointing out.

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 11-12-2015, 12:49 PM
#18
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(11-12-2015, 12:00 PM)crenedecotret Wrote: The same could probably be said about any extra that is sometimes added to soaps (shaving or otherwise), like shea butter, etc. 
True, especially the lower down, the substance in question, is on the ingredient-chain, IMHO.

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 11-12-2015, 12:56 PM
#19
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(11-12-2015, 12:49 PM)ask4Edge Wrote:
(11-12-2015, 12:00 PM)crenedecotret Wrote: The same could probably be said about any extra that is sometimes added to soaps (shaving or otherwise), like shea butter, etc. 
True, especially the lower down, the substance in question, is on the ingredient-chain, IMHO.


Are you sure about this? I'm not a soap maker but I hang with a couple. It's my understanding that the oils or butters you sometimes see at the end of the ingredient list are added after the process of making soap is over for additional moisturizing. Maybe one of our own soap makers will chime in and confirm, or deny.

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 11-12-2015, 01:00 PM
#20
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Adding artificial coloring seems... artificial. It surprises me when top-shelf companies that use natural ingredients add artificial colorants.  Even more so given the fact that artificially colored shaving soap still produces white lather (at least any that I've tried).

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