12-07-2015, 09:18 PM
#1
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Ive only seen a few straight razors in person. They all had lots of blade edge. The photos I see of Japanese style one piece razors is that the whole head is very small. Sometimes they seem to be about the size of a Gillette blue blade card box.

I see some shavettes use a single regular sized razor blade for an edge,
im curious about how well they maneuver.

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 12-08-2015, 06:09 AM
#2
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I used a shavette that took 1/2 of a DE blade. When I then started using a straight, there was quite the difference having all that much longer blade to swing. If you are considering the shavette as a learning tool to straights, I'd suggest going with a Feather type. They have longer replaceable blade that mimics regular straights, unless you develop a liking for Shortys.

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 12-08-2015, 10:32 AM
#3
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Most straights are around 3 inches in blade length.  A Japanese kamisori is around 2 1/2" long.  "Shorty" straight razors are around 2 1/4".  Feather Artist Club blades are just about 2" long (50mm).  DE blades are a little under 1 1/2" (37mm).

Personally, having tried all of the above except a shorty, I don't find any to be particularly more or less maneuverable than the other.  I think that, with traditional straights, that the size (5/8, 6/8, etc.) to be more of a factor as well as the handle style.  I prefer the kamisori style myself as the scales of a traditional straight always seem to get in the way.

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 12-08-2015, 04:03 PM
#4
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Im asking becaise the balance point looks so variable on the traditional straight versus the fixed kamisori.

What are uh um liw cost kamisori like options.

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 12-11-2015, 10:37 PM
#5
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I have three traditional kamisori.  They are sold in a general size range: 1,2,3, size 1 being the smallest.  Size 1 has a 1.5 inch long blade and 5/8 width.  Size 2 has a 1.75 inch long blade and 6/8 width.  Size 3 has a 2 inch blade with 7/8 inch plus width.  They all have correspondingly small to wide spine widths.  The length of the handles increases with sizes, as well.

I'm not sure I understand what you mean about variable balance point on straights.  For traditional straights, I guess you mean western style straight razors with scales.  Also, topcatman your last sentence seems to have been garbled.

As to maneuvrability,  the traditional kamisori (kamisori in Japan is a general name for any type of razor) are terrific. I think the smaller blade length helps.  You keep the blade almost flat on your face and make short strokes.  Also, the weight of the blade feels just right as you are shaving.

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 12-12-2015, 09:58 PM
#6
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as for my question on balance points with a straight, I mean it form the traditional western and standard Japanese style.

there is no set size on the traditional Japanese razor. So many custom adaptations to the basic design that it seems there might be a better balance point because the cjb and Feather SS seem to have spots designed into the surface for proper placement of the thumb and fore finger.
The photos of traditional western straights is slightly different. The old books and how tos all show one configuration of holding the hand, but in videos of shaving and photos of shaving, the hands are all differently arranged on the straight razor itself.
best I can say is, some hold it like they are going to bunt with the baseball bat, others like they are preparing for a line drive.

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 12-12-2015, 10:43 PM
#7
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The CJB and Feather SS are shavettes and feel very different from a western style straight razor or traditional kamisori.  Not the same animal at all.  More heft to regular straight razors.  You're holding a solid piece of steel and can place your hand or hands however you want that feels best.  All straights or kamisori are balanced so that when you hold them they aren't awkward.  With western style straights the scales can get in the way at first.

When I first started shaving with a western style straight razor, I used as if it were a kamisori, in that I held it with the scales pointing straight back.  If you have scales though, it is best that they are not straight out. 

The typical way you hold a straight razor is with forefinger and middle finger on top of the tang opposite the thumb on the bottom.  Your ring finger and maybe a bit of the little finger ride the tail of the tang.  That gives you the balance and grip so you can handle the razor.

With a traditional kamisori, you are not gripping the comparable "tang" by the top and bottom.  You grip it with your whole hand like a tennis racket.  With the larger, heavier sizes, you may want to press your thumb and finger on the sides of the "tang" closer to the heel of the blade for a sure grip.

If you are interested in straights, western or kamisori, you should buy one and learn to shave with it.  You can look at photos and watch videos and they can be helpful, but you have to take that next step.

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