12-15-2015, 08:28 AM
#1
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Im curious as to regional propensity for ingredirnts being used in soap and cream.

Portugal and spain seem to use the same ingredient list for creams while frencj creams seem to like more compkicated chemicals.

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 12-15-2015, 11:50 AM
#2
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There is an untapped market out there. Shaving soap for folks with hard water. I hate it for those that suffer this handicap. There is an unpleasant name for what you get with soap and hard water - scum.

Click here to understand why your soap won't lather.

/ModEdit: Corrected hyperlink

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 12-15-2015, 01:24 PM
#3
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(12-15-2015, 11:50 AM)Marcus Aurelius Wrote: There is an untapped market out there. Shaving soap for folks with hard water. I hate it for those that suffer this handicap. There is an unpleasant name for what you get with soap and hard water - scum.

Click here to understand why your soap won't lather.

/ModEdit: Corrected hyperlink

Not really.  The answer to this problem is chelating agents, and these are not new, nor are they unknown to soapmakers.  The most commonly used one is EDTA.  Many commercial soapmakers already include this ingredient in their soaps, as do some of the artisans.  Some artisans omit it because there are people who won't use soap that has EDTA in it, even though as far as I can tell EDTA is safe.  

I live in a soft water area and one of my main soaps has EDTA in it, even though I don't need it.  If I lived in a hard water area, I would specifically seek out EDTA on ingredients lists and specifically buy soaps that include it.

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 12-15-2015, 01:46 PM
#4
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(12-15-2015, 11:50 AM)Marcus Aurelius Wrote: There is an untapped market out there. Shaving soap for folks with hard water. I hate it for those that suffer this handicap. There is an unpleasant name for what you get with soap and hard water - scum.
Click here to understand why your soap won't lather.

There already exists a way to lather soaps in hard water and that is just to load more soap, really. Shy

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 12-15-2015, 01:56 PM
#5
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(12-15-2015, 01:46 PM)celestino Wrote:
(12-15-2015, 11:50 AM)Marcus Aurelius Wrote: There is an untapped market out there. Shaving soap for folks with hard water. I hate it for those that suffer this handicap. There is an unpleasant name for what you get with soap and hard water - scum.
Click here to understand why your soap won't lather.

There already exists a way to lather soaps in hard water and that is just to load more soap, really. Shy

Or get a jug of distilled water.

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 12-15-2015, 02:16 PM
#6
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(12-15-2015, 01:56 PM)GloryUprising Wrote:
(12-15-2015, 01:46 PM)celestino Wrote:
(12-15-2015, 11:50 AM)Marcus Aurelius Wrote: There is an untapped market out there. Shaving soap for folks with hard water. I hate it for those that suffer this handicap. There is an unpleasant name for what you get with soap and hard water - scum.
Click here to understand why your soap won't lather.

There already exists a way to lather soaps in hard water and that is just to load more soap, really. Shy

Or get a jug of distilled water.

Biggrin

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 12-15-2015, 02:58 PM
#7
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I choose not to use my tap water and either use distilled water or filtered water on my brushes on soaps.

But yes, EDTA is used to combat hard water and the issues of difficult lathering. That is at least one of the functions it could be chosen for.

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 12-15-2015, 03:30 PM
#8
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(12-15-2015, 01:24 PM)kingfisher Wrote:
(12-15-2015, 11:50 AM)Marcus Aurelius Wrote: There is an untapped market out there. Shaving soap for folks with hard water. I hate it for those that suffer this handicap. There is an unpleasant name for what you get with soap and hard water - scum.

Click here to understand why your soap won't lather.

/ModEdit: Corrected hyperlink

Not really.  The answer to this problem is chelating agents, and these are not new, nor are they unknown to soapmakers.  The most commonly used one is EDTA.  Many commercial soapmakers already include this ingredient in their soaps, as do some of the artisans.  Some artisans omit it because there are people who won't use soap that has EDTA in it, even though as far as I can tell EDTA is safe.  

I live in a soft water area and one of my main soaps has EDTA in it, even though I don't need it.  If I lived in a hard water area, I would specifically seek out EDTA on ingredients lists and specifically buy soaps that include it.

Another chelating agent that is far less controversial is citric acid (usually sodium citrate). You see this in B&M Latha and a couple other soaps. Another option is to fill your sink with tap water and add a pinch of citric acid directly, for the same effect.

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 12-15-2015, 04:10 PM
#9
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(12-15-2015, 03:30 PM)crazindndude Wrote:
(12-15-2015, 01:24 PM)kingfisher Wrote:
(12-15-2015, 11:50 AM)Marcus Aurelius Wrote: There is an untapped market out there. Shaving soap for folks with hard water. I hate it for those that suffer this handicap. There is an unpleasant name for what you get with soap and hard water - scum.

Click here to understand why your soap won't lather.

/ModEdit: Corrected hyperlink

Not really.  The answer to this problem is chelating agents, and these are not new, nor are they unknown to soapmakers.  The most commonly used one is EDTA.  Many commercial soapmakers already include this ingredient in their soaps, as do some of the artisans.  Some artisans omit it because there are people who won't use soap that has EDTA in it, even though as far as I can tell EDTA is safe.  

I live in a soft water area and one of my main soaps has EDTA in it, even though I don't need it.  If I lived in a hard water area, I would specifically seek out EDTA on ingredients lists and specifically buy soaps that include it.

Another chelating agent that is far less controversial is citric acid (usually sodium citrate). You see this in B&M Latha and a couple other soaps. Another option is to fill your sink with tap water and add a pinch of citric acid directly, for the same effect.

This works well too!

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 12-15-2015, 05:33 PM
#10
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(12-15-2015, 08:28 AM)topcatman Wrote: Im curious as to regional propensity for ingredirnts being used in soap and cream.

Portugal and spain seem to use the same ingredient list for creams while frencj creams seem to like more compkicated chemicals.

So citric acid is the alternative for avoiding complicated artificial ingredients
that may be, but haven't been proven to be harmful.
There you have it! Problem solved.
Felt like I dangled a participle somewhere.

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 12-16-2015, 11:09 AM
#11
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EDTA may cause slightly increased absorption of anything in the soap that is already absorbed through the skin.  So, if the soap doesn't have any dangerous absorbed ingredients, the addition of EDTA doesn't cause any harm.  This is an opinion that I came to after carefully reviewing a lot of information about EDTA.  You are certainly free to do your own research.  

I don't think it is worrisome at all, and one of my favorite soaps has EDTA in it.

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 12-16-2015, 07:01 PM
#12
  • kav
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  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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The earliest extant 'artificial' compound is  asphaltum modified by Neanderthal people via heat tempering. A long chemical list may cause pause VS one with 'eye of newt' and implied visions of John dos Passos'  description of meat packing houses VS James Herriot veterinary idylls. But, a aspirin
is nothing more than a carefully measured bit of tree bark; and artificial compounds may save their natural counterparts from overexploitation. A savvy consumer learns what those ingredients mean from pre to post consumer impact. Be greatfull they list them. The latest trade treaties and pushback on food labeling are not to the benefit of Earth's peoples.

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