07-12-2012, 08:55 AM
#1
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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The ridiculous hot weather we were experiencing here in St Louis Missouri finally broke on Sunday just gone. The day prior (Saturday 7th July) it reached 113°F (45°C), believe me this pale skinned, freckled, red haired, half Irishman was beginning to melt in such heat...

It's still a little too hot for me, but I'll take low 90°F (low 30°C) any day of the week over +100°F (+38°C).

[Image: voCdy.jpg]

Baptisia "False Indigo - Solar Flare" seed pods



[Image: TGWyd.jpg]

Eastern Blazing Star

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 07-12-2012, 10:54 AM
#2
  • freddy
  • Senior Member
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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How do you get your garden to flourish in such unremitting heat? Are there no water restrictions in your area?

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 07-12-2012, 01:30 PM
#3
  • mikeperry
  • Senior Member
  • St Louis via the UK
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(07-12-2012, 10:54 AM)freddy Wrote: How do you get your garden to flourish in such unremitting heat? Are there no water restrictions in your area?

Hi Freddy

Those past 11 days of continuous +100°F (+38°C) aren't normal, thankfully.

July and August are normally hot (low to mid 90's) and humid, with little rainfall. April and May are normally the wettest (a lot! of rainfall) months of the year. Every month this year so far has been considerably warmer than average, but the most notable thing has been the lack of rain eg In our street's common ground areas there are cracks in the ground (grassed areas) I can put my hands down into as far as my wrists...

Definitely planting the right plants for the location helps greatly eg
  • Hosta garden is shaded along the West side of our house, might get 2 hours of sun in late afternoon, therefore ideal location for a shade garden.
  • The back garden is South facing so can get really! hot out there, but by mainly selecting and planting (I'm guessing 90% plus) native plants that tolerate full sun, are somewhat drought tolerant, means they can stand up well to such heat, conditions.
  • I've also learnt most plants are a lot! harder, more resilient than they look.
No water restrictions here, the wife says she has never known there to be, mainly because we are sandwiched between the Missouri and Mississippi rivers.

During the heat of Summer I will water the garden twice a week (if there's been no rain). When I water I water as deeply as possible (light, frequent waterings are a waste of water and time). That said, during the 11 days of continuous +100°F (+38°C) I did find (learn) I had go out every other day day and water; sounds kind of strange but I could clearly see the plants suffering out there under such heat...

Take care, Mike

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 07-12-2012, 02:54 PM
#4
  • freddy
  • Senior Member
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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(07-12-2012, 01:30 PM)mikeperry Wrote:
(07-12-2012, 10:54 AM)freddy Wrote: How do you get your garden to flourish in such unremitting heat? Are there no water restrictions in your area?

Hi Freddy

Those past 11 days of continuous +100°F (+38°C) aren't normal, thankfully.

July and August are normally hot (low to mid 90's) and humid, with little rainfall. April and May are normally the wettest (a lot! of rainfall) months of the year. Every month this year so far has been considerably warmer than average, but the most notable thing has been the lack of rain eg In our street's common ground areas there are cracks in the ground (grassed areas) I can put my hands down into as far as my wrists...

Definitely planting the right plants for the location helps greatly eg
  • Hosta garden is shaded along the West side of our house, might get 2 hours of sun in late afternoon, therefore ideal location for a shade garden.
  • The back garden is South facing so can get really! hot out there, but by mainly selecting and planting (I'm guessing 90% plus) native plants that tolerate full sun, are somewhat drought tolerant, means they can stand up well to such heat, conditions.
  • I've also learnt most plants are a lot! harder, more resilient than they look.
No water restrictions here, the wife says she has never known there to be, mainly because we are sandwiched between the Missouri and Mississippi rivers.

During the heat of Summer I will water the garden twice a week (if there's been no rain). When I water I water as deeply as possible (light, frequent waterings are a waste of water and time). That said, during the 11 days of continuous +100°F (+38°C) I did find (learn) I had go out every other day day and water; sounds kind of strange but I could clearly see the plants suffering out there under such heat...

Take care, Mike

Interesting, Mike. Even though we're a shaving site, your garden photos and experiences have become a real highlight for me. I was only teasing before when I mentioned working for the Botanic Garden. I'm not anymore. They'd gain a real asset in you. Thumbsup

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 07-12-2012, 03:14 PM
#5
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Interesting!

And yes, one can absolutely see plants suffering in the heat of the day. That's why greens should be picked in the morning during hot weather.

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