01-19-2016, 06:50 PM
#1
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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Hi, guys. If you have  Vintage SEs (GEM, ER, etc.), and would like to use modern or vintage 10/32 threaded handles on them, this is an easy way to go about it.
Note that this only works with 10/32 threaded heads. Most of the GEM and Ever ready heads are 10/32, though there are a few that are not.


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 01-19-2016, 06:51 PM
#2
  • Johnny
  • MODERATOR EMERITUS
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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Thanks for the lesson, Mike.

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 01-19-2016, 06:54 PM
#3
  • ben74
  • Senior Member
  • Perth, Australia
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Great tutorial, thanks for sharing.

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 01-19-2016, 06:59 PM
#4
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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Thanks, gentlemen. Hope it helps someone!

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 01-19-2016, 07:10 PM
#5
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I did that for my 1924.  Works great, but I highly recommend a stainless set screw.  First time I used a plain old steel screw and it started to rust very quickly.

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 01-19-2016, 07:16 PM
#6
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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(01-19-2016, 07:10 PM)gwsmallwood Wrote: I did that for my 1924.  Works great, but I highly recommend a stainless set screw.  First time I used a plain old steel screw and it started to rust very quickly.


Yep. I mention that in the video. But the one you see in the video I have used for at least a year. As long as you take it apart and dry it thoroughly, it shouldn't be a problem. At least I haven't had any issues.
But yeah, stainless steel is available, and makes a ton of sense, IMO.
Thanks!

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 01-20-2016, 09:11 AM
#7
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(01-19-2016, 07:16 PM)SRNewb Wrote:
(01-19-2016, 07:10 PM)gwsmallwood Wrote: I did that for my 1924.  Works great, but I highly recommend a stainless set screw.  First time I used a plain old steel screw and it started to rust very quickly.


Yep. I mention that in the video. But the one you see in the video I have used for at least a year. As long as you take it apart and dry it thoroughly, it shouldn't be a problem. At least I haven't had any issues.
But yeah, stainless steel is available, and makes a ton of sense, IMO.
Thanks!

Good to know.  I watched it on silent or I would have noticed that.

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 01-20-2016, 10:47 AM
#8
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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(01-20-2016, 09:11 AM)gwsmallwood Wrote:
(01-19-2016, 07:16 PM)SRNewb Wrote:
(01-19-2016, 07:10 PM)gwsmallwood Wrote: I did that for my 1924.  Works great, but I highly recommend a stainless set screw.  First time I used a plain old steel screw and it started to rust very quickly.


Yep. I mention that in the video. But the one you see in the video I have used for at least a year. As long as you take it apart and dry it thoroughly, it shouldn't be a problem. At least I haven't had any issues.
But yeah, stainless steel is available, and makes a ton of sense, IMO.
Thanks!

Good to know.  I watched it on silent or I would have noticed that.


LOL!

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 01-20-2016, 10:58 AM
#9
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I'm terrible at handy things, even something as easy as this looks to be. However, I fortunately had a good friend do this recently and I asked if he would modify both a 1914 and a 1924 head for me. It sounds like both of my modified heads will be making the return trip starting tomorrow. I can't wait to see how these great razor heads perform while attached to an amazing Triad titanium handle that fits my hand like a glove.

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 01-20-2016, 11:04 AM
#10
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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Brian, good for you! I love being able to use different handles on these old fellas. Really makes them not only look good, but shave better/different. Lots of fun!
I should have mentioned in the video that a bit of epoxy would permanently affix the stud to either handle or head, if one wanted to go that route.

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 01-20-2016, 11:25 AM
#11
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Informative video, thanks for sharing.

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 01-20-2016, 03:26 PM
#12
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(01-20-2016, 11:04 AM)SRNewb Wrote: Brian, good for you! I love being able to use different handles on these old fellas. Really makes them not only look good, but shave better/different. Lots of fun!
I should have mentioned in the video that a bit of epoxy would permanently affix the stud to either handle or head, if one wanted to go that route.

Yes Mike. I believe he used loctite on the razor head. I wanted these to stay this way while I'm keeping another example as original. I'm really looking forward to trying them out.

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 01-20-2016, 04:53 PM
#13
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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Yeah, Loctite is a good idea. Hope you enjoy!

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 01-20-2016, 07:46 PM
#14
  • Wrathen
  • Senior Member
  • Gulf Breeze, FL
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Neat thanks for the video


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 01-20-2016, 08:02 PM
#15
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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Thanks, Phillip!

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 01-20-2016, 08:42 PM
#16
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So I understand that the 1914 and other model's thread is different from 10/32, right? How do you adapt those?

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 01-20-2016, 08:50 PM
#17
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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It would depend on the value of the razor to you, but for me, I'd drill and tap out the hole in the head to 10-32. I believe these heads are 8-32(I think I read that somewhere), so you should be able to size them up.
But someone else may have a better solution.

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 01-20-2016, 08:54 PM
#18
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Is that you in the video? If so, I've seen your shave videos before. Great stuff!

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 01-20-2016, 08:56 PM
#19
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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(01-20-2016, 08:54 PM)NeoXerxes Wrote: Is that you in the video? If so, I've seen your shave videos before. Great stuff!


Yes, that is I.
Thank you!

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 01-21-2016, 06:14 AM
#20
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Thanks for a useful video Mike.

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