07-13-2012, 02:17 PM
#1
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This is probably a very naive question, but will someone please advise whether a good silvertip brush should dry bristles downwards or does it not really matter if it rests on its base?
Thanks guys. Confused

Jack

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 07-13-2012, 02:21 PM
#2
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I have always rested mine on the base, bristles up. Never had an issue. Just rinse it well and let it dry.

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 07-13-2012, 02:22 PM
#3
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(07-13-2012, 02:21 PM)SteelTown Wrote: I have always rested mine on the base, bristles up. Never had an issue. Just rinse it well and let it dry.

Thanks Dan Biggrin

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 07-13-2012, 02:27 PM
#4
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Uh-oh, I think you're going to have a variety of responses here, perhaps the most diplomatic being, "It doesn't really matter." Personally, I think a brush looks best drying upside-down and hanging from a stand (sort of like hanging a painting brush to dry from a hole in the handle). The fact that Vie-Long sells its better brushes with a stand renders the "shaving-stands-are-only-sold-to-get-you-to-buy-more-stuff" conspiracy moot IMO. I always hang mine to dry using a stand, and store them away like this as well.

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 07-13-2012, 02:35 PM
#5
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(07-13-2012, 02:17 PM)drmjlovell Wrote: This is probably a very naive question, but will someone please advise whether a good silvertip brush should dry bristles downwards or does it not really matter if it rests on its base?
Thanks guys. Confused

Jack

Does not matter at all in my experience. Just let it dry for an entire day if you dry it with bristles up if you're concerned about it. The reasoning being that without gravity, it ***may*** take longer to dry the brush out thoroughly. I say may because I honestly don't know and obviously this will depend on where you store the brush and the humidity conditions thereof.

That said, I would surmise that gravity would aid the drying process slightly, but not so much as to make any real difference.

I threw away all of my brush stands. I didn't have any fancy chrome ones. They just took up space, didn't fit all my brushes and looked ugly.

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 07-13-2012, 02:44 PM
#6
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(07-13-2012, 02:27 PM)Alum of Potash Wrote: Uh-oh, I think you're going to have a variety of responses here, perhaps the most diplomatic being, "It doesn't really matter." Personally, I think a brush looks best drying upside-down and hanging from a stand (sort of like hanging a painting brush to dry from a hole in the handle). The fact that Vie-Long sells its better brushes with a stand renders the "shaving-stands-are-only-sold-to-get-you-to-buy-more-stuff" conspiracy moot IMO. I always hang mine to dry using a stand, and store them away like this as well.

The reason for the question is that I presently rest my brush in a stand which I would ideally like to use for a second razor but I equally want to look after the brush.
My travel brush always dries on its base but I don't use it every day for extended periods so I'm therefore pleased to receive your comment.

(07-13-2012, 02:35 PM)asharperrazor Wrote:
(07-13-2012, 02:17 PM)drmjlovell Wrote: This is probably a very naive question, but will someone please advise whether a good silvertip brush should dry bristles downwards or does it not really matter if it rests on its base?
Thanks guys. Confused

Jack

Does not matter at all in my experience. Just let it dry for an entire day if you dry it with bristles up if you're concerned about it. The reasoning being that without gravity, it ***may*** take longer to dry the brush out thoroughly. I say may because I honestly don't know and obviously this will depend on where you store the brush and the humidity conditions thereof.

That said, I would surmise that gravity would aid the drying process slightly, but not so much as to make any real difference.

I threw away all of my brush stands. I didn't have any fancy chrome ones. They just took up space, didn't fit all my brushes and looked ugly.

Thank you for your opinion. So... you don't think that moisture running into the neck rather than away from it is likely to make any difference?

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 07-13-2012, 03:38 PM
#7
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Well, there's more at work here than just gravity. There's capillary action which will actually allow water to climb away from gravity.

Plus, (here it comes) water vapor is lighter than air and rises. Putting base down allows the water vapor to freely escape. A brush will dry faster handle down.

The "free" stands given with some brushes? They really aren't free, you're buying them, it's just figured into the price, so that argument doesn't work. You're buying it and they're selling it, they simply aren't giving the buyer a choice.

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 07-13-2012, 04:39 PM
#8
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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The vast majority of brushes have flat bases, so combined with the well established phenomenon of capillary action, I think you have your answer...

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 07-13-2012, 04:47 PM
#9
  • TexBilly
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • Austin, TX
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(07-13-2012, 04:39 PM)ben74 Wrote: The vast majority of brushes have flat bases, so combined with the well established phenomenon of capillary action, I think you have your answer...

Indeed. Although a few healthy flicks to rid most of the water does help.

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 07-13-2012, 05:17 PM
#10
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(07-13-2012, 02:44 PM)drmjlovell Wrote: Thank you for your opinion. So... you don't think that moisture running into the neck rather than away from it is likely to make any difference?

Not at all. Well, unless you don't shake out your brush. Then the water may pool at the bottom and *might* eat away at the glue, depending on the glue used. Could cause rot I guess. Honestly, I've never seen it happen though.

edit:
Shadowsdad statement makes logical sense. The capillary action combined with the water vapor's desire to rise upwards could in fact dry the brush faster. In which case, pooled water at the bottom is a non issue due to the relatively fast capillary action. Still, wouldn't recommend you not shake out the water. (shake the brush out).

Regardless, if you really wanted to dry your brush out the fastest way possible. Put a fan on it (doesn't matter up or down). The air flow will cause the water to evaporate at an accelerated rate.

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 07-13-2012, 05:20 PM
#11
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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(07-13-2012, 04:47 PM)TexBilly Wrote:
(07-13-2012, 04:39 PM)ben74 Wrote: The vast majority of brushes have flat bases, so combined with the well established phenomenon of capillary action, I think you have your answer...

Indeed. Although a few healthy flicks to rid most of the water does help.

Agreed.

I gently squeeze the brush, a few careful flicks and a light rub (in the direction of the handle) on a towel. Then left standing on it's base in the open air (not a cabinet etc) for a minimum of a day. I have more than enough brushes that the same brush won't see any use on consecutive days, ensuring that each brush dries thoroughly between uses.

This is probably the most important aspect of brush drying - that the brush is thoroughly dried between uses. Hanging in a stand versus standing on it's base is more an issue of personal preference. I believe a member on another forum went to great lengths to empirically prove that it makes no difference to drying time (or drying effectiveness) regardless of standing versus hanging.

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 07-13-2012, 05:43 PM
#12
  • daccpa
  • Weber fanboy
  • Middle Tennessee
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FWIW I personally prefer the idea of hanging them from a nice fancy stand made for the brush and the blade, I mean that's seemed to me to be a pert of the charm of DE shaving when I got into this madness. I have several stands on the countertop now and I only hang the brush on a stand AFTER it is completely dried. I found that letting them dry on the stand was causing a sour smell to permeate the bristles. I started drying them "bristles up" and the sour smell is no longer there ! Of course YMMV, it might just be my imagination.

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 07-13-2012, 05:45 PM
#13
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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(07-13-2012, 02:21 PM)SteelTown Wrote: I have always rested mine on the base, bristles up. Never had an issue. Just rinse it well and let it dry.

Yup...this is how I store them as well

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 07-13-2012, 07:06 PM
#14
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The only thing I've noticed with resting a damp brush on its handle is that it splays the hairs/bristles more. I like a brush to hold its shape, so mine hang until dry.

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 07-13-2012, 11:14 PM
#15
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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Here is my answer to the question.

   

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 07-14-2012, 06:44 PM
#16
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Does not matter on the position of the brush for drying.

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 07-14-2012, 07:02 PM
#17
  • MickToley
  • Hi, I'm Mike and I'm a shave soap addict
  • Brooklyn, NY
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There isn't a difference between the two, both ways have the same end result. I prefer to let brushes dry on the base, though.

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 07-14-2012, 07:25 PM
#18
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As others have said, it really is a matter of personal preference. The difference in how fast the brush dries standing or hanging from a stand is miniscule. More important is allowing the brush to dry thoroughly. I give my brushes a gentle squeeze followed by a gentle shake and usually place them in a stand to dry. Some of my bigger brushes do not fit in my stand so they stand upright while they dry. I never carry a stand when I travel and have never noticed a real difference between the two methods.

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 07-14-2012, 07:27 PM
#19
  • Shanman
  • Reserve Collection Squirrel Hair
  • NE Florida
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I sleep better at night knowing whatever brush I used is drying bristle down. I'm anal about brush care, it doesn't hurt, and makes me not so OCD.Biggrin

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 07-15-2012, 02:52 AM
#20
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Thank you guys for your input. I guess the jury is now in on this one and I now feel comfortable about drying my travel brush standing on its base.
Jack

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