01-24-2016, 08:14 AM
#1
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Gentlemen, I picked up a wade and butcher that potentially had a slight smile to it. However now that I have it in my possession it appears maybe someone had bread knifed this smile out.

I'm not the most experienced when it comes to honing but I have spent quite some time in between an Atoma 500 and the Shapton 1000 trying to re-establish a bevel with no luck. I feel I am removing more metal than doing good. Is this razor salvageable?! Should I send it off to be honed by someone with more experience.

Any advice would greatly be appreciated!

Best wishes


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 01-24-2016, 09:55 AM
#2
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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I would definitely send it out for professional honing.

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 01-24-2016, 10:02 AM
#3
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(01-24-2016, 09:55 AM)evnpar Wrote: I would definitely send it out for professional honing.

Thank you, I figured that would probably be the best bet. I guess I was more concerned in if the thing could even be brought back to life. With that said I am fairly new to the forum and have met some great people in the short period I've been around. Is there anyone you could recommend?! Or be willing to take on such a job?!


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 01-24-2016, 10:44 AM
#4
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(01-24-2016, 09:55 AM)evnpar Wrote: I would definitely send it out for professional honing.

I second this.

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 01-24-2016, 10:47 AM
#5
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(01-24-2016, 10:02 AM)knate22 Wrote:
(01-24-2016, 09:55 AM)evnpar Wrote: I would definitely send it out for professional honing.

Thank you, I figured that would probably be the best bet. I guess I was more concerned in if the thing could even be brought back to life. With that said I am fairly new to the forum and have met some great people in the short period I've been around. Is there anyone you could recommend?! Or be willing to take on such a job?!


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gssixgun on SRP or Lynn Abrams as well on SRP.  Both are well qualified and have been on the hones for quite some years!

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 01-24-2016, 06:03 PM
#6
  • Doc226
  • edge snob (and proud of it)
  • Smallest State
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Can you post a picture of the razor?

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 01-25-2016, 04:08 AM
#7
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As Doc226 has suggested we need to see a picture to determine what's up.

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 01-25-2016, 04:19 AM
#8
  • Johnny
  • MODERATOR EMERITUS
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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knate22, not sure where you are located, but Doc226 is in Rhode Island and he is one of the best on the hone that I've seen.

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 01-25-2016, 04:29 AM
#9
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(01-25-2016, 04:19 AM)Johnny Wrote: knate22, not sure where you are located, but Doc226 is in Rhode Island and he is one of the best on the hone that I've seen.

I second that, Alfredo has done several straights for me (Restorations and Honing) and put's on a killer edge, he's even been schooling this Ol Boy in the finer art of honing from bevel to finish.

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 01-25-2016, 05:12 AM
#10
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(01-24-2016, 06:03 PM)Doc226 Wrote: Can you post a picture of the razor?

Here are some pictures of the straight. Hopefully you can gather some information. If you need a special view of the razor please let me!

[Image: 150ac5260344b2d3fb929c70d3ad1611.jpg][Image: ca439151f2d3310f0fd47fae3b19d9d7.jpg][Image: 3abd25f62e53b33dd547c2ee19ab81f3.jpg][Image: d5c4cc9979b706ff54743c28e0737f11.jpg][Image: 587fe9d924aebe0e361a7b7a3d23c06c.jpg]


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 01-25-2016, 07:01 AM
#11
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It appears to have heavy hone wear on the spine but the bevel looks pretty straight, you could try to add a layer of elec tape to the spine to reduce any further wear, what method are you using to determine if the bevel is set correctly or not.

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 01-25-2016, 07:23 AM
#12
  • BobH
  • Senior Member
  • Thunder Bay Canada
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I cringe when I see that kind of honing done to a nice blade. The hone wear is pretty massive on the spine. I don't think it is worth the effort needed to put a smile back into the blade. OTH I would just tape the spine to prevent more hone wear to the spine and live with the straight edge on the blade. It will still shave well but look odd. Classic example of what using the wrong honing stroke on a smiling blade will result in. It can still be a good shaver though.

Bob

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 01-25-2016, 07:40 AM
#13
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(01-25-2016, 07:01 AM)Panther308 Wrote: It appears to have heavy hone wear on the spine but the bevel looks pretty straight, you could try to add a layer of elec tape to the spine to reduce any further wear, what method are you using to determine if the bevel is set correctly or not.

I have done the thumb nail test...in which it doesn't bite at all...also I have taken a cherry tomato and ran the blade down it...will not even break the skin.


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 01-25-2016, 07:42 AM
#14
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(01-25-2016, 07:23 AM)BobH Wrote: I cringe when I see that kind of honing done to a nice blade. The hone wear is pretty massive on the spine. I don't think it is worth the effort needed to put a smile back into the blade. OTH I would just tape the spine to prevent more hone wear to the spine and live with the straight edge on the blade. It will still shave well but look odd. Classic example of what using the wrong honing stroke on a smiling blade will result in. It can still be a good shaver though.

Bob

I appreciate the advice...with my lack of experience on the hone...I will probably have it sent out for restoration. I do feel like it could be a lovely blade. I just wish the damage wasn't so extensive.


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 01-25-2016, 08:21 AM
#15
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As stated hone wear is pretty excessive, my guess is someone as you stated breadknifed the edge to give the edge a straight line rather than do or learn a rolling X stroke, I for one struggle with rolling X's as I have only done a few you might PM Doc226 or one of the other restoration experts here to see if it's worth it but my take is not worth the investment in $$.

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 01-25-2016, 08:45 AM
#16
  • BobH
  • Senior Member
  • Thunder Bay Canada
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(01-25-2016, 07:42 AM)knate22 Wrote:
(01-25-2016, 07:23 AM)BobH Wrote: I cringe when I see that kind of honing done to a nice blade. The hone wear is pretty massive on the spine. I don't think it is worth the effort needed to put a smile back into the blade. OTH I would just tape the spine to prevent more hone wear to the spine and live with the straight edge on the blade. It will still shave well but look odd. Classic example of what using the wrong honing stroke on a smiling blade will result in. It can still be a good shaver though.

Bob

I appreciate the advice...with my lack of experience on the hone...I will probably have it sent out for restoration. I do feel like it could be a lovely blade. I just wish the damage wasn't so extensive.


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Personally, I would not put too much into it with regards to restoring it considering it's current condition unless it has some value as an heirloom. I would just live with the current condition and have someone set a proper bevel and hone it to shave ready. I think it is past the restoration stage but will make a good user once honed properly. As someone else mentioned, those smiling blades which may also have a wrap/twist in them really need a heel forward rolling X stroke and possibly other honing gymnastics to due justice to them.

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 01-25-2016, 11:52 AM
#17
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If only people would listen when it came to taping spines you've taken so much meat off the spine you have drastically altered the razors geometry that razor was a very straight forward razor to hone, It's still can be honed but you have made it far more difficult If that came in to me I would use at least three layers of tape a permanent marker pen mark the edge then push it over the hone a few times then evaluate where I need to go, shame but it can be fixed all the same.

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 01-30-2016, 07:13 AM
#18
  • Doc226
  • edge snob (and proud of it)
  • Smallest State
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I would measure the bevel angle before randomly putting on tape.

I would bet that razor was bread knifed straight and then honed, that used to have a smile when new.

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 01-30-2016, 02:44 PM
#19
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I agree with Doc. That razor most likely did have a smile . And home wear isn't the bugaboo many seem to think it is. 
And like Doc I'd measure the angle before I'd go slapping on tape for no good reason.
On this razor it could prove to be a mistake.

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 01-30-2016, 03:14 PM
#20
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Use a sharpie. Trust me from expierence many many times when sharpening or honing on my lower grits I've grinder away and grinded away and my angles were wrong. That one little mark can make all the difference trust me. 

I would throw some tape on it and go as coarse a stone as I could. Watch the sharpie though when you get close to the edge go up a grit . This is just my method . I don't like having that coarse of an edge to work with so I'll stop just before I apex the edge and move to a higher grit stone. Do this too soon and you'll be grinding for a while though.

I know what I would do to that razor . I don't know what your skills are with stones and or machines though so what I would do vs what you can do are 2 different things.

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