06-25-2017, 05:23 AM
#61
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
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I'd love to have an Egg, but the prices in Canada are in nose bleed territory.  Komados Joe are a bit cheaper, but still up there.

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 06-25-2017, 06:08 AM
#62
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Phil, I always suggest to noobs that they start by either searing a steak or a few burgers. Temp' control is minimal with those cooks. Be sure to use a bit of smoking wood, and no need to soak the chunks (yes, use chunks and not dust) in a ceramic cooker. Just get the meat as close to the fire as possible. I fill my firebox up as full as possible and if the grate has legs I invert it. I don't know what's possible with the BGE so you'll need to figure it out.

A second fairly easy cook with great results is a spatchcocked chicken. Temp' control is minimal and the results are good. Instead of a 10 minute sear it'll be like roasting a chicken in an oven (I use a heat deflector), but with done lump and a smidgeon of smoke. All poultry is a sponge for smoke and we find that the little that comes from the lump is about right. Smoke gets out of hand rapidly with birds.

A third cook, after learning temp' control a bit better is pulled pork. And the final test is brisket. There are other things along the way, ribs and such, but you'll figure out what you want to eat as the urge strikes. But make a great brisket and you'll know you've arrived.

Don't think that you need food in the cooker to learn temp' control either. It's perfectly acceptable to burn a little lump just to learn. You know that by shutting all of the openings you smother the fire and the lump will be there for the next cook, right?

I don't know what's in the Green Room , but I know that the Primo Forum has an extensive section of recipes. I'm a mod' over there. Yes, you can be a member and not own a Primo. Menbership is a formality that keeps spammers away and you must be a member to access the site for anything meaningful. You can even post and such w/o owning a Primo, but it's frowned on to be a fan boy for other cookers while on the site. It would be like taking Daisy to the prom and talking about Mary Lou all night (very bad form) and we won't allow it for long. Just don't be a fanboy and nothing is said. Lots of folks over there have other brands of cookers. http://primogrillforum.com/ should get you there. Once a member you have access to all of the archives and can take part, there's only one section that only mods can access. Whoops, the factory section can only be accessed by folks who have initiated a thread there, and then can only access their thread.

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 06-25-2017, 06:24 AM
#63
  • Rob W
  • Senior Member
  • Central IL, USA
User Info
Good choice Phil. I added a BGE back in February. One of the best choices I have made.

  I also have a Traeger pellet grill that I have had for a couple years now and love using it as my oven in the summer. It is quick and easy to get it to the temp I want and hold it there with no problem, as long as it it under about 425 or so. It worked well in the winter for smoking but sometimes had problems above 300 when the outside temp got below 40. The BGE has no problem with 600 or 700 even when it was 20 deg out. The one minor down side (but is also a big positive) of the BGE is how long it takes to cool down. I can have the cover on the pellet grill about a hour after I have shut it down. I have to wait until the next morning to put the cover on the BGE. I have made some wonderful ribs, pulled pork and brisket on both the Traeger and the BGE. The steaks, burgers, chicken breasts and pizzas on the BGE have been outstanding.

   The BGE does have a bit of a learning curve on getting it to the desired temp and holding it there. You might want to look into one of the thermostat fan systems that are out there. I have a CyberQ right now. I use it when I want to do long cooks at a stable temp that is between 225 and 350.. I like the system but I don't feel the pit and food probes are the same quality as some of my other temperature monitors. One of the other system on the market is the Flame Boss. I have seen some good reviews of this and others on the BGE Facebook group. These systems will allow you to monitor the temp of your pit and food from your phone and adjust the temp up or down from the store or the pub.

Have fun and enjoy.

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 06-25-2017, 07:49 AM
#64
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
User Info
(06-25-2017, 06:08 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Phil, I always suggest to noobs that they start by either searing a steak or a few burgers. Temp' control is minimal with those cooks. Be sure to use a bit of smoking wood, and no need to soak the chunks (yes, use chunks and not dust) in a ceramic cooker. Just get the meat as close to the fire as possible. I fill my firebox up as full as possible and if the grate has legs I invert it. I don't know what's possible with the BGE so you'll need to figure it out.

A second fairly easy cook with great results is a spatchcocked chicken. Temp' control is minimal and the results are good. Instead of a 10 minute sear it'll be like roasting a chicken in an oven (I use a heat deflector), but with done lump and a smidgeon of smoke. All poultry is a sponge for smoke and we find that the little that comes from the lump is about right. Smoke gets out of hand rapidly with birds.

A third cook, after learning temp' control a bit better is pulled pork. And the final test is brisket. There are other things along the way, ribs and such, but you'll figure out what you want to eat as the urge strikes. But make a great brisket and you'll know you've arrived.

Don't think that you need food in the cooker to learn temp' control either. It's perfectly acceptable to burn a little lump just to learn. You know that by shutting all of the openings you smother the fire and the lump will be there for the next cook, right?

I don't know what's in the Green Room , but I know that the Primo Forum has an extensive section of recipes. I'm a mod' over there. Yes, you can be a member and not own a Primo. Menbership is a formality that keeps spammers away and you must be a member to access the site for anything meaningful. You can even post and such w/o owning a Primo, but it's frowned on to be a fan boy for other cookers while on the site. It would be like taking Daisy to the prom and talking about Mary Lou all night (very bad form) and we won't allow it for long. Just don't be a fanboy and nothing is said. Lots of folks over there have other brands of cookers. http://primogrillforum.com/ should get you there. Once a member you have access to all of the archives and can take part, there's only one section that only mods can access. Whoops, the factory section can only be accessed by folks who have initiated a thread there, and then can only access their thread.
Thank you Brian. That is a great suggestion to burn some lump first to get a feel for things. Thank you for the link to the Primo forum...I will definitely check it out.

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 06-25-2017, 07:53 AM
#65
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
User Info
(06-25-2017, 06:24 AM)Rob W Wrote: Good choice Phil. I added a BGE back in February. One of the best choices I have made.

  I also have a Traeger pellet grill that I have had for a couple years now and love using it as my oven in the summer. It is quick and easy to get it to the temp I want and hold it there with no problem, as long as it it under about 425 or so. It worked well in the winter for smoking but sometimes had problems above 300 when the outside temp got below 40. The BGE has no problem with 600 or 700 even when it was 20 deg out. The one minor down side (but is also a big positive) of the BGE is how long it takes to cool down. I can have the cover on the pellet grill about a hour after I have shut it down. I have to wait until the next morning to put the cover on the BGE. I have made some wonderful ribs, pulled pork and brisket on both the Traeger and the BGE. The steaks, burgers, chicken breasts and pizzas on the BGE have been outstanding.

   The BGE does have a bit of a learning curve on getting it to the desired temp and holding it there. You might want to look into one of the thermostat fan systems that are out there. I have a CyberQ right now. I use it when I want to do long cooks at a stable temp that is between 225 and 350.. I like the system but I don't feel the pit and food probes are the same quality as some of my other temperature monitors. One of the other system on the market is the Flame Boss. I have seen some good reviews of this and others on the BGE Facebook group. These systems will allow you to monitor the temp of your pit and food from your phone and adjust the temp up or down from the store or the pub.

Have fun and enjoy.

Wow! That is amazing. I will have to look into these systems and I definitely have to check out the BGE Facebook group.

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 06-25-2017, 08:05 AM
#66
  • Rob W
  • Senior Member
  • Central IL, USA
User Info
Oh, one other thing to remember. After each of the first few cooks, make sure the nuts on the ring that holds the lid on are tight and then check it from time to time after that. The ring can expand with the heat and loosen and cause the lid to end up on the ground in pieces. This is not common but it can and has happened. This reminds me that I have not checked mine in a while.

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 06-25-2017, 10:47 AM
#67
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Phil, I use a forced air system also and they're great, but don't use it as a crutch  instead of learning how to operate the cooker manually. A forced draft system will allow holding the temp' to within a degree. It's much more accurate than any indoor oven.

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 06-25-2017, 12:54 PM
#68
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
User Info
(06-25-2017, 08:05 AM)Rob W Wrote: Oh, one other thing to remember. After each of the first few cooks, make sure the nuts on the ring that holds the lid on are tight and then check it from time to time after that. The ring can expand with the heat and loosen and cause the lid to end up on the ground in pieces. This is not common but it can and has happened. This reminds me that I have not checked mine in a while.

Thanks for the tip Rob. The delivery guy also told me to make sure to check every so often.

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 06-25-2017, 12:55 PM
#69
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
User Info
(06-25-2017, 10:47 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Phil, I use a forced air system also and they're great, but don't use it as a crutch  instead of learning how to operate the cooker manually. A forced draft system will allow holding the temp' to within a degree. It's much more accurate than any indoor oven.

That is amazing! I am really tempted to try and bake an apple pie in it.

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 06-25-2017, 01:07 PM
#70
  • garyg
  • Active Member
  • Great Lakes
User Info
I've found that it will hold steady for a long time without the need for an add-on.  I've run pulled pork for over 18 hours with the temp rock steady (still lump left too!)   I'd try without the gizmo first.  I think that the natural variation in the food being cooked negates any advantage to holding any steadier than the +/- 3° that is the most I see once the temperature has stabilized.    It is getting it stable that is the trick to learn, and the tip about not letting it get too hot is worth remembering well.  

Baking is easy, not sure what the smoke would do for a pie.  I do pizza alot and it does pick up some smokiness even in a couple minutes

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 06-25-2017, 01:38 PM
#71
  • Sully
  • Super Moderator
  • Cedar Park, Texas
User Info
I've baked bread in my BGE a few times, pizza is something we do regularly.  Unless I add some wood chunks I don't notice any extra smokiness.

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 06-25-2017, 03:30 PM
#72
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(06-25-2017, 05:23 AM)Rufus Wrote: I'd love to have an Egg, but the prices in Canada are in nose bleed territory.  Komados Joe are a bit cheaper, but still up there.


Komodo Joes also include all of the accessories!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 06-26-2017, 05:02 AM
#73
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(06-24-2017, 02:41 PM)bullgoose Wrote: Well, it took me over a year to actually pull the trigger but, I finally decided to go with the Big Green

It takes time but you'll learn to love it. I bought one of the original BGE's 25+ years ago and it's still going strong. A forced ventilation system is recommended for smoking - I've a pork shoulder, lamb shoulder and brisket setup for the long weekend.

A trick to the chimney starter - don't use the starter in the egg - you'll just burn your gasket and handle. Instead, get a steel/galvanized bucket, turn it over and light the chimney on that on the ground - much better. You may need to remove the handle to get it to work. Only thing I'll ever use.

Keep that gas grill though - it's still perfect for some things. We've got an old Fire Magic and use it at least as much as the BGE.

Have Fun!

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 07-07-2017, 08:28 AM
#74
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ok Phil, now think abalone in the green egg. my friend has been diving for years . one of the best meals of my life.  hope they are still available these days.

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