03-04-2016, 06:11 PM
#1
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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By author Philip Henscher. I recently discovered this fun read and received my copy this afternoon. I managed to PM Freddy and realized it would be quicker just to give a shout out. I wont give away to much, but it is a fascinating look at handwriting.

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 03-04-2016, 06:22 PM
#2
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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In 1956 I was sitting in Mrs. Hill's 5th grade classroom. Our desks provided a well for our ink bottle, which we filled weekly, while obtaining a new nib for our fountain pens. We developed our skills by practicing the Palmer method of handwriting for more than an hour a day. All of our school work was written in blue-black ink and was also graded on penmanship. I thank Mrs. Hill to this day. It's a shame that cursive is rarely taught in our schools. We now know that the complex fine-motor movements involved with learning cursive at an early age wire the brain in a way that promotes learning throughout one's academic career. Thanks for the recommendation.

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 03-04-2016, 06:37 PM
#3
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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Someone recently came up with a 'print' that is arranged in wavy lines. The curious thing is people with dyslexia can easily read it. I need to learn Copperpoint. My handwriting is somewhere between G.K. Chesterton and J.R.R. Tolkien

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 03-04-2016, 09:38 PM
#4
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(03-04-2016, 06:22 PM)evnpar Wrote: In 1956 I was sitting in Mrs. Hill's 5th grade classroom. Our desks provided a well for our ink bottle, which we filled weekly, while obtaining a new nib for our fountain pens. We developed our skills by practicing the Palmer method of handwriting for more than an hour a day. All of our school work was written in blue-black ink and was also graded on penmanship. I thank Mrs. Hill to this day. It's a shame that cursive is rarely taught in our schools. We now know that the complex fine-motor movements involved with learning cursive at an early age wire the brain in a way that promotes learning throughout one's academic career. Thanks for the recommendation.
I'm very glad I read this, I know the schools will fail so this will be fun teaching my son.

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 03-05-2016, 01:59 AM
#5
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I was here to read this. It's interesting.

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 01-15-2017, 07:13 PM
#6
  • jjfar
  • Young priest in a big parish
  • North Carolina
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(03-04-2016, 06:22 PM)evnpar Wrote: In 1956 I was sitting in Mrs. Hill's 5th grade classroom. Our desks provided a well for our ink bottle, which we filled weekly, while obtaining a new nib for our fountain pens. We developed our skills by practicing the Palmer method of handwriting for more than an hour a day. All of our school work was written in blue-black ink and was also graded on penmanship. I thank Mrs. Hill to this day. It's a shame that cursive is rarely taught in our schools. We now know that the complex fine-motor movements involved with learning cursive at an early age wire the brain in a way that promotes learning throughout one's academic career. Thanks for the recommendation.
When i was a young boy in Ireland,In 1951 the equivalent of first grade in America
we also had ceramic inkwells in the holes in the desk.
We did not have the palmer method but we did practice writing with nib pens.
in our copybooks
God save you if you blotted your copybook,
the nuns were hard taskmasters.

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 01-15-2017, 09:55 PM
#7
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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(01-15-2017, 07:13 PM)jjfar Wrote:
(03-04-2016, 06:22 PM)evnpar Wrote: In 1956 I was sitting in Mrs. Hill's 5th grade classroom. Our desks provided a well for our ink bottle, which we filled weekly, while obtaining a new nib for our fountain pens. We developed our skills by practicing the Palmer method of handwriting for more than an hour a day. All of our school work was written in blue-black ink and was also graded on penmanship. I thank Mrs. Hill to this day. It's a shame that cursive is rarely taught in our schools. We now know that the complex fine-motor movements involved with learning cursive at an early age wire the brain in a way that promotes learning throughout one's academic career. Thanks for the recommendation.
When i was a young boy in Ireland,In 1951 the equivalent of first grade in America
we also had ceramic inkwells in the holes in the desk.
We did not have the palmer method but we did practice writing with nib pens.
in our copybooks
God save you if you blotted your copybook,
the nuns were hard taskmasters.

Fortunately, Mrs. Hill wasn't a nun and I still have fond memories of her class. She taught me well. I'm a physician and several years ago was playing golf with friends when my pager went off. A pharmacist was calling, stating that someone was trying to fill one of my prescriptions but that it must be a forgery, as no physician could have that good of handwriting. Although I didn't care for being interrupted on my rare time off because of my neat handwriting, it was somewhat amusing.

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 01-16-2017, 08:58 AM
#8
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(01-15-2017, 09:55 PM)evnpar Wrote: Fortunately, Mrs. Hill wasn't a nun and I still have fond memories of her class. She taught me well. I'm a physician and several years ago was playing golf with friends when my pager went off. A pharmacist was calling, stating that someone was trying to fill one of my prescriptions but that it must be a forgery, as no physician could have that good of handwriting. Although I didn't care for being interrupted on my rare time off because of my neat handwriting, it was somewhat amusing.

A great story Richard!

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