03-18-2016, 04:57 PM
#1
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There's something I've been noticing lately: after my usual two pass shave every morning I feel like I get a very close shave. Generally I'm not looking for a BBS but just a smooth clean and close shave. However in the past few weeks when I go to the restroom at work which is very well lit with bright lights, my shave does not look as close as it does at home. I'm considering adding a small lamp to the bathroom just for shaving to improve my shaves.

Has anyone else had similar experiences here?

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 03-18-2016, 05:07 PM
#2
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I agree. I've completed exceptional shaves and looked in my girlfriend's lighted magnifying mirror, and gone back for another pass. It's amazing how much we miss when you really look close.


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 03-18-2016, 05:08 PM
#3
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I tend to miss on my ATG pass on the chin. So hard to see what I'm doing D:

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 03-18-2016, 05:11 PM
#4
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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I use flourescent overhead lighting to film my shave videos. I also use that lighting when I shave, regardless of whether I'm filming or not. Good lighting is essential. Particularly as your eyes age.

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 03-18-2016, 05:28 PM
#5
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My bathroom has 4 bulbs that make for 160 watts . 

But I use only 3 bulbs.

120 watts is enough for me.

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 03-18-2016, 10:31 PM
#6
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I shower shave, and never see what I'm doing. I touch and stretch every inch of my face to be sure I've gotten the closest BBS shave possible.

Going by touch tells you more than sight ever will. It's just a matter of practice and habit. It is a method by which good or poor lighting is never a concern, and one in which gives more knowledge and intimacy of your own face.

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 03-19-2016, 03:09 AM
#7
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Ask Ray and Stevie...

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 03-19-2016, 03:23 AM
#8
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To quote Shaving Made Easy (the free eBook I flog in my signature):
Quote:The mirror should hang between two windows if possible, so that when you look into it the light will fall directly upon both sides of your face.

Having an even light is just as important as having enough light.

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 03-19-2016, 09:11 AM
#9
  • SRNewb
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  • No. Va, USA
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I'd rather see and feel, thank you. MHO. One does not negate the importance of the other for me. YMMV.

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 03-19-2016, 10:14 AM
#10
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(03-19-2016, 09:11 AM)SRNewb Wrote: I'd rather see and feel, thank you. MHO. One does not negate the importance of the other for me. YMMV.

That might make sense in theory, but it doesn't generally pan out in practice. If it did, people wouldn't be surprised when they realized their shave results were worsening with sub-par light or aging eyes. YMMV.

The sense of touch here doesn't age, and it does not require an extra crutch in specialized lighting to accomplish optimal results. And even with the best eyes and light available, the best BBS results, which go under the pores, cannot be detected by sight alone, but requires touch first and foremost. Develop a mastery of shave by touch first (which can be speeded up by not using sight to practice), and sight afterwards can be a decent secondary aid to the primary sense for shaving. Touch.

(IMHO. YMMV. Etc. Etc.)

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 03-19-2016, 11:01 AM
#11
  • SRNewb
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(03-19-2016, 10:14 AM)Len Wrote:
(03-19-2016, 09:11 AM)SRNewb Wrote: I'd rather see and feel, thank you. MHO. One does not negate the importance of the other for me. YMMV.

That might make sense in theory, but it doesn't generally pan out in practice. If it did, people wouldn't be surprised when they realized their shave results were worsening with sub-par light or aging eyes. YMMV.

The sense of touch here doesn't age, and it does not require an extra crutch in specialized lighting to accomplish optimal results. And even with the best eyes and light available, the best BBS results, which go under the pores, cannot be detected by sight alone, but requires touch first and foremost. Develop a mastery of shave by touch first (which can be speeded up by not using sight to practice), and sight afterwards can be a decent secondary aid to the primary sense for shaving. Touch.

(IMHO. YMMV. Etc. Etc.)


Does not matter. Sight is still a very important part of the act of shaving. Most people don't close their eyes, or put on blinders to shave. There is room for BOTH, and Both have their place. Sight does not negate touch, nor does touch negate sight, unless you're blind, which is a red herring and is like comparing apples to oranges. Most of us are sighted, thank God.
The point I was making, and still am, is that both matter.
As far as the sense of touch not aging, old age, and things like neuropathy, etc., can and do indeed take their toll on the sense of touch for many.
MHO, etc.
But i do agree with you that touch is extremely important.
As an instrument builder, I know first hand that my hands will tell me much more than my eyes about when the wood is smooth enough for finish. But that does not mean I don't need my eyes, either. They go together.

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 03-19-2016, 02:33 PM
#12
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Mike, I think sight can make a difference in shaving, I just don't think it is nessesary, or the primary factor in shaving unless you make it so. 

And I also think relying too heavily on sight,  can lead to lesser shaves if you are ever in a situation with poor lighting or deteriorating eyesight, which is common in nearly everyone getting older. (Losing the sense of touch is rare. And if  you get to the point where you cannot feel your own skin, or your muscles are failing, let's face it, you won't be shaving yourself anyway at that point.) 

If you teach yourself to shave by touch, which isn't hard, you have more options. You can shower shave (I do), you will know instantly when you have the closest BBS on every part of your face, you won't need complicated or expensive lighting setups, it will never make a difference when you travel and must deal with different lighting, and it will be easy to adjust with eyesight deterioration in old age.

Not taking anything away from the benefits of sight, mind you, but it is the secondary benefit. Master and rely on touch first, and use sight as an add on guide.

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 03-19-2016, 05:30 PM
#13
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Until I saw this post, I never gave it much thought but I will think about some additional lighting in my bathroom.  There are times when I look in a mirror and realize that I didn't get the best of shaves that day and as mentioned above I will combine that with better lighting and hopefully get a more consistent shaving experience!

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 03-19-2016, 11:57 PM
#14
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Using good lighting and the sense of touch together sounds like a good combination to me.

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 03-20-2016, 03:43 AM
#15
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I noticed that before I began wet shaving. Lighting may help but you may find your fingertips and the sound of the razor good resources in determining if you've shaved close enough.

Simply feeling your face with wet hands reveals missed stubble. And some blades "sing" or produce a unique sound while removing stubble. When you no longer feel stubble with your fingertips or hear the blade sing, you have an acceptably close shave.

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 03-20-2016, 12:07 PM
#16
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To me touch is the most important indicator, I fall into the unfortunate category that even a BBS that is completely smooth will still look like I have stubble to remove from my face. I simply can not remove anymore, but it looks like the start of 5:00 shadow. When I first started out this caused some serious irritation as I attempted to remove all trace of visible whiskers. Now I finish my shave and actually close my eyes and feel along my jawline and chin to see if I have missed anything.

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 03-21-2016, 03:02 AM
#17
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Bayside, NY
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It's all important for my shaving satisfaction. At least since I started trad shaving. For 30+ years I shaved in the shower with despisables, based only on touch and instinct. Didn't know any better, and my shaves were miserable.
  What I have noticed recently is that different rooms/mirrors/lighting all play a factor in shave effectiveness. Btw, how does one lather up with a brush in the shower?

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 03-21-2016, 07:19 AM
#18
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(03-21-2016, 03:02 AM)chazt Wrote: Btw, how does one lather up with a brush in the shower?

Easy. With your back to the shower head to load and lather (one can actually turn off the water while loading and lathering too, but its not nessesary), and a stand placed within reaching distance just outside the shower to place bowl, brush, and soap to sit while shaving.

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 03-21-2016, 07:41 AM
#19
  • chazt
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(03-21-2016, 07:19 AM)Len Wrote:
(03-21-2016, 03:02 AM)chazt Wrote: Btw, how does one lather up with a brush in the shower?

Easy. With your back to the shower head to load and lather (one can actually turn off the water while loading and lathering too, but its not nessesary), and a stand placed within reaching distance just outside the shower to place bowl, brush, and soap to sit while shaving.

Okay, I get it. Sounds like something of a juggling act. Personally, I'll stick with standing in front of the sink and mirror.

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 03-21-2016, 07:45 AM
#20
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(03-21-2016, 07:41 AM)chazt Wrote: Okay, I get it. Sounds like something of a juggling act. Personally, I'll stick with standing in front of the sink and mirror.

Nah, not really. It doesn't take any more movements or work than standing in front of a mirror. The benefit is that it makes less of a mess in the shower, and requires less cleanup, than it does in front of the mirror.

One also doesn't have to mess with wet or dry towels. Face prepping and rinsing is also much easier, instant, efficient, and better feeling.

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