03-25-2016, 10:34 AM
#1
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Hello gents,

What caliper you will advise to buy?
Firm, model etc.?

Thank in advance.

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 03-25-2016, 10:40 AM
#2
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Mitutoyo is one of the best the 150mm should be ok
raj k


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 03-25-2016, 11:59 AM
#3
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(03-25-2016, 10:40 AM)rajkalra Wrote: Mitutoyo  is one of the best the 150mm should be ok
raj k


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Thank you.

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 03-25-2016, 12:37 PM
#4
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For what use? Is repeatability a major concern? What level of accuracy? Electronic or mechanical?

For machining and mechanical work, an electronic one from Mitutoyo is one of the better option; very good accuracy and repeatability. For general use, such as woodworking and measuring brushes, a half-decent set of vernier calipers is more than good enough and a lot kinder to the wallet. Make sure to get one that does both metric and imperial measures - most of them can get down to 0.05mm and 1/128".

[Image: 640px-Vernier_caliper.svg.png]

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 03-25-2016, 12:44 PM
#5
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For what use? What level of accuracy you need? How important is repeatability? Electronic or vernier?

For machining and mechanical repair work, an electronic one from Mitutoyo is a great choice; very good accuracy and repeatability, somewhat high cost. Make sure you keep the linear encoder free of grease, oil and dust though.

For more everyday use, such as woodworking and measuring shaving brushes, a well built vernier callipers is a much better option in my opinion. Make sure you get one that handles both metric and those weird English measures, preferable down to 0.05mm and 1/128".  They are near unbreakable if you treat them with respect, will never run out of batteries, and is a lot kinder to the wallet.

[Image: 640px-Vernier_caliper.svg.png]

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 03-25-2016, 12:57 PM
#6
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(03-25-2016, 12:44 PM)WegianWarrior Wrote: For what use? What level of accuracy you need? How important is repeatability? Electronic or vernier?

For machining and mechanical repair work, an electronic one from Mitutoyo is a great choice; very good accuracy and repeatability, somewhat high cost. Make sure you keep the linear encoder free of grease, oil and dust though.

For more everyday use, such as woodworking and measuring shaving brushes, a well built vernier callipers is a much better option in my opinion. Make sure you get one that handles both metric and those weird English measures, preferable down to 0.05mm and 1/128".  They are near unbreakable if you treat them with respect, will never run out of batteries, and is a lot kinder to the wallet.

[Image: 640px-Vernier_caliper.svg.png]


To measure the knot sizes on brushes and handles of safety razors)))

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 03-25-2016, 01:09 PM
#7
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Then a reasonable priced vernier calliper will be more than sufficient Smile

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 03-25-2016, 01:13 PM
#8
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For that you don't need much! But you'd want it in metric or be connected at the hip to a conversion program.

I'd check a woodworking supply. I have a good Mitutoyo dial caliper for precision stuff, but 2 plastic calipers for woodworking. I'd google "metric calipers plastic". Brand is meaningless, you're not doing small tolerance work.

Edit: I just checked amazon and found suitable calipers for under $4. Shipping might cost more than the caliper.

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 03-25-2016, 01:19 PM
#9
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(03-25-2016, 01:09 PM)WegianWarrior Wrote: Then a reasonable priced vernier calliper will be more than sufficient Smile

(03-25-2016, 01:13 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: For that you don't need much! But you'd want it in metric or be connected at the hip to a conversion program.

I'd check a woodworking supply. I have a good Mitutoyo dial caliper for precision stuff, but 2 plastic calipers for woodworking. I'd google "metric calipers plastic". Brand is meaningless, you're not doing small tolerance work.

Edit: I just checked amazon and found suitable calipers for under $4. Shipping might cost more than the caliper.

Thanks gents!

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 03-25-2016, 04:19 PM
#10
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I run a calibration lab and backup rajkalra's mention of Mitutoyo calipers, if you want a digital set. If you don't need anything like that then just go to harbor freight or the like and get a cheap set. They will still be accurate for measuring knots, handles, etc.

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 03-26-2016, 12:33 AM
#11
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I bought. thanks to all!

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 03-26-2016, 06:58 AM
#12
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Yeah, Mitutoyo's hard to beat, It's what I use when I need accuracy. Even my 1" mike is mitutoyo, but I only use that when I need to measure to the .0001. And they last. I've had the calipers for over 40 years and I got the mike before the caliper. I lust after a digital, but my dial caliper works fine and doesn't need a battery. I have to wonder if anyone even knows how to use a vernier caliper anymore; it's what I learned on.

Freddie, does anyone use vernier calipers anymore? A thing of the past?

Edit: for those who don't know, Wegian Warrior posted a pic of a vernier caliper.

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 03-26-2016, 07:24 AM
#13
  • DRD_3
  • Junior Member
  • Michigan
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(03-26-2016, 06:58 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Yeah, Mitutoyo's hard to beat, It's what I use when I need accuracy. Even my 1" mike is mitutoyo, but I only use that when I need to measure to the .0001. And they last. I've had the calipers for over 40 years and I got the mike before the caliper. I lust after a digital, but my dial caliper works fine and doesn't need a battery. I have to wonder if anyone even knows how to use a vernier caliper anymore; it's what I learned on.

Freddie, does anyone use vernier calipers anymore? A thing of the past?

Edit: for those who don't know, Wegian Warrior posted a pic of a vernier caliper.

I work in the tool and die industry, and yes we still have a pair English/metric verniers. It's 24" and truthfully, I think I'm the only one that can read it properly. We only break it out once and a while. Does take some skill and practice to use, so something to consider. Most of the digital can be deceiving as they read into the tenths, but are only accurate to three decimal places--something to consider. Dial calipers need slightly less skill than verniers to read, and no batteries. They can get gummed up and the amplification mechanism to tend to get damaged--so not for harsh environments (I keep a pair at my desk). Verniers are better for dirtier environments. Obviously you don't want to be throwing or dropping any type of caliper.

They sell cheap digital calipers at some of the big box improvement department stores. Amazon probably will have better deals, especially if you just want to measure knot sizes, and not concerned with tolerances and what not. Probably wouldn't be dealing with calipers designed for use in high precision industries--you could spend a lot of money on these instruments.

I personally would probably use just a measuring tape in the knot measuring situation...

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 03-26-2016, 07:58 AM
#14
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A vernier takes a little bit of skill to use, but it's a skill I've taught to quite a few others back when I was working heavy maintenance on fighter jets... once you 'get it' it's obvious, fast and easy. With an accuracy of 0.05mm (0.002") it's more than accurate enough for most things - with the possible exception of hydraulic cylinders...

I've never used dial callipers - used a lot of other dial instruments, mostly for measuring roundness and surface profiles - but prefer verniers for my callipers and micrometers.

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 03-26-2016, 08:17 AM
#15
  • MaxP
  • Senior Member
  • Madison, WI
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My advice: Skip the vernier. No need for something as good as a Mitutoyo.

The Amazon choice should be sufficient. I have a Harbor Freight digital that I think was less than $15. It has done fine for measuring knots and hole sizes, etc.

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 03-26-2016, 09:16 AM
#16
  • vferdman
  • Artisan
  • Western Massachusetts
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I have a set of vernier calipers with metric and inches, an inexpensive dial caliper in just inches and a very inexpensive (from Harbor Freight) digital caliper that does metric and inches in both decimal and fractional forms. The dial caliper broke very quickly because it is a fine mechanical machine and did not like being dropped. I also really hated the fact that it only did inches in decimal. So, RIP dial caliper, I will not replace you. The vernier caliper is my favorite for my brush making shop. It is sturdy, inexpensive (got it at a tag sale for $15), accurate enough for what use it for and has both metric and inches (in fractional form). It lives in my shop and I  use it in woodworking as well as brush making. If you have a chance to grab one of these cheap at a garage sale, do not hesitate. Even as a backup it will pay for itself the first week you own it. No batteries, no delicate clockworks, it needs no calibration. As long as you understand its limitations in accuracy and know how to use the vernier scales, it will last a lifetime. The cheap HF digital is, well... cheap. But it works great and if it breaks, no big loss at $15. However, it is reasonably accurate (again for what I use it for) and can convert between metric and inches, which is a godsend. That caliper lives in my tinkering/electronics shop, does not get exposed to the rigors of the wood shop. Both tools set me back $30. I am not a machinist, so laying out triple digits for a set of calipers is pointless for me. As much as I appreciate a good quality tool, I also appreciate that a tool is a tool and its value is in what it does and how it does it.

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 03-26-2016, 10:42 AM
#17
  • DRD_3
  • Junior Member
  • Michigan
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(03-26-2016, 09:16 AM)vferdman Wrote: I have a set of vernier calipers with metric and inches, an inexpensive dial caliper in just inches and a very inexpensive (from Harbor Freight) digital caliper that does metric and inches in both decimal and fractional forms. The dial caliper broke very quickly because it is a fine mechanical machine and did not like being dropped. I also really hated the fact that it only did inches in decimal. So, RIP dial caliper, I will not replace you. The vernier caliper is my favorite for my brush making shop. It is sturdy, inexpensive (got it at a tag sale for $15), accurate enough for what use it for and has both metric and inches (in fractional form). It lives in my shop and I  use it in woodworking as well as brush making. If you have a chance to grab one of these cheap at a garage sale, do not hesitate. Even as a backup it will pay for itself the first week you own it. No batteries, no delicate clockworks, it needs no calibration. As long as you understand its limitations in accuracy and know how to use the vernier scales, it will last a lifetime. The cheap HF digital is, well... cheap. But it works great and if it breaks, no big loss at $15. However, it is reasonably accurate (again for what I use it for) and can convert between metric and inches, which is a godsend. That caliper lives in my tinkering/electronics shop, does not get exposed to the rigors of the wood shop. Both tools set me back $30. I am not a machinist, so laying out triple digits for a set of calipers is pointless for me. As much as I appreciate a good quality tool, I also appreciate that a tool is a tool and its value is in what it does and how it does it.

More of a curiosity, as I'm not at all familiar with what it takes to make a brush exactly. Why would you need anything other than a simple measuring tape or ruler to determine knot size? Could you make some simple gauges from ply-board or PVC? Again I do not have a great amount of insight when it comes to the brush making process and would appreciate understanding this a little better.

Thanks,

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 03-26-2016, 11:30 AM
#18
  • Harvey
  • Senior Member
  • North Hills CA
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There is a new invention called a ruler...can be obtained at most hardware stores..General makes a metal one with both a metric and standard USA inches...it is 6 " long...possibly costs $3.00......Is there a difference between a 24mm and a 24.346mm knot?....just wondering? Biggrin

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 03-26-2016, 12:10 PM
#19
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There certainly is a difference between a 24.000mm and a 24.346mm knot if you're making brush handles by hand and want the hole to be the right size... measure twice, cut (or drill, or use a carbide tool) once Smile

Not a difference that is of great importance to most of us, but critical to some Wink

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 03-26-2016, 12:28 PM
#20
  • Harvey
  • Senior Member
  • North Hills CA
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Oh I thought he was just a collector not a manufacturer...so sorry. Tongue

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