04-05-2016, 01:50 PM
#1
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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My remaining bottle of Waterman's is almost empty and I will be restocking soon. I am indulging in several colours and brands this time; any hints for a longer lived supply? I know the routine for my small wine and shaving soap collection; avoid sunlight, keep sealed, keep cool and most important- keep using them.

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 04-05-2016, 01:59 PM
#2
  • Wrathen
  • Senior Member
  • Gulf Breeze, FL
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From my understand most fountain pen inks can be kept for 10-20 years and still be good. Once I discovered this I decided not to worry about it. That said I know pigmented inks and iron gal inks will last longer.

As for recommendations depends on what your tastes run to do I'll list a few of my all time favorite inks:
KWZ Iron Gal Gummiberry
Diamine Bilberry
Sailor Sei-Boku
Private Reserve DC Supershow Blue
Montblanc Saffron (special edition good luck finding any for a good price)


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 04-09-2016, 09:39 AM
#3
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parker recommends throwing away their ink after a year as opening and closing it can lead to enough water to evaporate out of the ink changing its viscosity.

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 11-17-2016, 07:00 AM
#4
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(04-09-2016, 09:39 AM)asiliski Wrote: parker recommends throwing away their ink after a year as opening and closing it can lead to enough water to evaporate out of the ink changing its viscosity.

Parker wants to sell more ink.  I have Quink from 50 years ago and Penman from 20 years ago.  All still work without problems.  if you're worried about viscosity, put in a few drops of distilled water.  Throwing away cartridges might make sense since water does evaporate through the plastic.

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 11-17-2016, 03:13 PM
#5
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(11-17-2016, 07:00 AM)kronos9 Wrote:
(04-09-2016, 09:39 AM)asiliski Wrote: parker recommends throwing away their ink after a year as opening and closing it can lead to enough water to evaporate out of the ink changing its viscosity.

Parker wants to sell more ink.  I have Quink from 50 years ago and Penman from 20 years ago.  All still work without problems.  if you're worried about viscosity, put in a few drops of distilled water.  Throwing away cartridges might make sense since water does evaporate through the plastic.

For that matter, I have successfully reconstituted half-dried cartridges by using a syringe to inject distilled water to replace the water lost by evaporation through the plastic immediately before finally using the cartridge. (When you have hundreds of cartridges for different pens in your stockpile, they don't always get used within a couple of years as they should be.).

Always remember that selling ink in liquid form for fountain pens is a relatively modern idea for convenience. The original way to sell fountain pen ink was in a solid tablet form, to which the user added water when needed. If you look at ads from WW1 for the early Sheaffer and Parker "eyedropper" fountain pens, for example, this was a selling point over the dip pens they were still competing with: an ink supply for several weeks could be carried in a tiny tube of pellets with no mess or excess weight issues, and when a soldier wanted to write a letter, all he had to do was drop a pellet in the body of the pen, fill to the brim with water, screw it together and shake it gently to mix the ink.

As for ink lifespan, the only thing that can really kill it is if it gets contaminated and starts to grow mold, which in turn will really clog up a pen. Most modern inks have biocides in them as a result to prevent this. (Much of what contributes to the sharp, almost medicinal, smell of most inks.) As they get older, some inks will fade as well. However while their colour is less intense, they still work. I have Parker, Sheaffer and Waterman inks in the old office / school bottles common from the 1930s to about the 1960s -- quart-sized bottles intended to be used to fill the individual desk inkwells each morning - and while the blue ink in them is a bit more faded than when it was sold 60 years ago, it still writes my notes just fine.

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 11-17-2016, 06:12 PM
#6
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I have a bottle of Waterman's that is probably 15 years old.  I bought it for my wife but she would rather use the cartridges so she gave it to me.

My favorites are:

Diamine - Ancient Copper
Diamine - Pumpkin
Noodlers - Antietam
Noodlers - Black & Blue
Stipula - Sepia

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