05-04-2016, 08:17 AM
#1
  • Teddyboy
  • Guilty, with an explanation
  • NYC
User Info
I have been reading about some of the more highly recommended shaving creams, and have been curious as to their ingredient list.  I'm referring to a specific list of ingredients as one usually finds with soaps.l  However, I am trouble finding such lists, e.g., for Ejsberg, Xpec.  For AOS, I did find this,

INGREDIENTS Water/Aqua, Palmitic Acid, Myristic Acid, Stearic Acid, Potassium Hydroxide, Coconut Acid, Glycerin, Triethanolamine, Sodium Hydroxide, Lauric Acid, Propylene Glycol, Tetrasodium Edta, Disodium Edta, Phenoxyethanol, Methylisothiazolinone


But why is it generally difficult to find complete ingredient lists for creams?

1 796
Reply
 05-04-2016, 08:42 AM
#2
  • Nero
  • ACV is my new BFF
  • le montagne
User Info
I don't agree. Soaps and creams both have ingredient lists on their packaging, by law.

62 3,014
Reply
 05-04-2016, 08:50 AM
#3
  • Teddyboy
  • Guilty, with an explanation
  • NYC
User Info
(05-04-2016, 08:42 AM)Nero Wrote: I don't agree. Soaps and creams both have ingredient lists on their packaging, by law.

You're right legal eagle, I guess I'm just missing them.  I'm talking about the online vendor descriptions.  I check ingredient lists before I purchase.

1 796
Reply
 05-04-2016, 09:08 AM
#4
User Info
I don't think there is any legal obligation for an online retailer to list the ingredients but I think its a good practice.  However, I can also see how if the maker doesn't readily provide such information, it would be hard to re-transmit.  I just bought some Esbjerg shaving cream and aftershave and while their site provided some of the ingredients it wanted to promote, there were obviously a lot more included in the formulations themselves.  If someone like Phil wanted to list the ingredients on his site, he would probably have to transcribe them himself from the box.

84 1,505
Reply
 05-04-2016, 09:33 AM
#5
  • Teddyboy
  • Guilty, with an explanation
  • NYC
User Info
(05-04-2016, 09:08 AM)jpakstis Wrote: I don't think there is any legal obligation for an online retailer to list the ingredients but I think its a good practice.  However, I can also see how if the maker doesn't readily provide such information, it would be hard to re-transmit.  I just bought some Esbjerg shaving cream and aftershave and while their site provided some of the ingredients it wanted to promote, there were obviously a lot more included in the formulations themselves.  If someone like Phil wanted to list the ingredients on his site, he would probably have to transcribe them himself from the box.
Yes, this is what I have encountered as well.  I am just surprised that vendors, generally, don't take the extra step.

1 796
Reply
 05-05-2016, 09:27 AM
#6
User Info
There could be a lot of reasons.  They might want to promote an image that is at odds with the actual ingredients in their products.  You see it with products that tout desirable ingredients in their promotional material, but then when you do find an ingredient list, it's way way down the list.  Or because the nature of the product requires the use of ingredients (preservatives, propylene glycol, trietholamine) that they think the consumer will object to.  Or they're afraid someone will copy their formula.

0 281
Reply
 05-05-2016, 11:07 AM
#7
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
User Info
(05-05-2016, 09:27 AM)Mystic Water Wrote: There could be a lot of reasons.  They might want to promote an image that is at odds with the actual ingredients in their products.  You see it with products that tout desirable ingredients in their promotional material, but then when you do find an ingredient list, it's way way down the list.  Or because the nature of the product requires the use of ingredients (preservatives, propylene glycol, trietholamine) that they think the consumer will object to.  Or they're afraid someone will copy their formula.

Also, especially if a vendor sells various products from many sources, and from smaller makers who may change formulations frequently, the task of keeping the listings current (to avoid claims of false advertising in addition to maintain a good relationship with one's own customers) could be daunting.

1 1,110
Reply
 05-05-2016, 11:35 AM
#8
  • VTMAX
  • Banned
  • Woodstock, Vermont
User Info
Esbjerg[Image: 9bef92903a7224bc19c820335fd21459.jpg]


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

42 1,041
Reply
 05-05-2016, 12:17 PM
#9
  • VTMAX
  • Banned
  • Woodstock, Vermont
User Info
Why would a vendor bother unless they are in bed with some second rate artisans? Just stay away from the junk. Mystic is great, Mike's Natural is great. Just stick with the winners.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

42 1,041
Reply
 05-05-2016, 03:30 PM
#10
  • Teddyboy
  • Guilty, with an explanation
  • NYC
User Info
(05-05-2016, 09:27 AM)Mystic Water Wrote: There could be a lot of reasons.  They might want to promote an image that is at odds with the actual ingredients in their products.  You see it with products that tout desirable ingredients in their promotional material, but then when you do find an ingredient list, it's way way down the list.  Or because the nature of the product requires the use of ingredients (preservatives, propylene glycol, trietholamine) that they think the consumer will object to.  Or they're afraid someone will copy their formula.

Very interesting perspectives.  Thank you.

1 796
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)