05-11-2016, 11:12 AM
#1
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...thanks to the guys singing it's praises here on the Nook.

Tried it once today, using inverted method with my regular coffee. Going to need to experiment a bit with the amount of coffee, brew times and other variables... but I'm quite happy with the quality and ease of use.

It'll be great for bringing with me when I'm away on training classes and 'business trips' - at least those times I can bring more than my GoBag Tongue

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 05-11-2016, 11:57 AM
#2
  • greyhawk
  • Senior Member
  • Southern California
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I use mine every day. Great coffee, fast, easy to use and clean up. I experimented with different methods and settled on standard (non-inverted), using 26 gm (.9 oz) of coffee. I brew it for ~2 minutes.

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 05-11-2016, 01:20 PM
#3
  • Aleksey
  • Enabler
  • Istanbul, Turkiye
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(05-11-2016, 11:57 AM)greyhawk Wrote: I use mine every day. Great coffee, fast, easy to use and clean up. I experimented with different methods and settled on standard (non-inverted), using 26 gm (.9 oz) of coffee. I brew it for ~2 minutes.

Whoa 26 grams?! How much water do you include? Sounds like a tough man's coffee...

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 05-11-2016, 01:34 PM
#4
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I weighted one full scoop of my regular grind to 30 grams... and with water up to the "4" mark it made an acceptable strong cup.

Yes, I like 'em strong Smile

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 05-11-2016, 01:54 PM
#5
  • eengler
  • Administrator
  • South Dakota, USA
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Nice Hans, Enjoy!

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 05-11-2016, 02:24 PM
#6
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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Real men strain coffee grounds through their teeth. My poor Nicaraguan sister in law warned me Cuban coffee was to strong for me at this great Cuban restaurant. I swallowed it in one gulp and had two more. I tried to explain I had just finished a season packing mules at Grand Canyon.

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 05-11-2016, 03:55 PM
#7
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(05-11-2016, 02:24 PM)kav Wrote: Real men strain coffee grounds through their teeth. My poor Nicaraguan sister in law warned me Cuban coffee was to strong for me at this great Cuban restaurant. I swallowed it in one gulp and had two more. I tried to explain I had just finished a season packing mules at Grand Canyon.
Biggrin

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 05-12-2016, 08:56 AM
#8
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Welcome to the Aeropress club, I always enjoy the coffee I brew in mine - also inverted, for 3 minutes.

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 05-12-2016, 09:13 AM
#9
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I was intrigued by this, but then I started to read reviews on amazon. While most reviews were excellent. 1 person commented on the plastic used, while it doesn't permiate BPA , theirs was actually corroding, and the plastic contains BPA, so she/he was ingesting BPA daily. Its one of the first reviews on the 1st page or 2. They went pretty in depth about it during the review linking journals regarding research on BPA and such. I decided against it at that point, have any of you noticed the inside plastic becoming rough to the touch and possible corrosion?

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 05-12-2016, 09:30 AM
#10
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According to Aerobie there haven't been any BPA used in the Aeropress in a long time - see http://www.aerobie.com/aeropress/aeropress-materials/ - so I wouldn't worry too much over that issue.

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 05-12-2016, 10:36 AM
#11
  • Mr_Smartepants
  • Senior Member
  • Cambridgeshire, UK (CONUS post address)
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I'm tempted by this.  At home I've got two french press setups but they're a pain to clean.  In my office I've got a Delonghi espresso machine but it makes a racket.
Seems like the aeropress solves both these problems.

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 05-12-2016, 10:52 AM
#12
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Just made a cup in the aeropress right now - about four minutes including boiling water and washing up, and that includes a 90 second steeping (which seems close to ideal with the fine ground dark espresso I got in the house).

One major drawback though; even using what Aerobie calls "four cups", my mug isn't filled up to the top  Dodgy

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 05-12-2016, 11:00 AM
#13
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I enjoy using my Aeropress aswell. I also have a stovetop moka pot that I use when I have time, but the Aeropress is so much easier that now only use the moka pot on the weekends.

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 05-12-2016, 11:21 AM
#14
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I have a moka pot too, a stainless steel Valira.  It's pretty good, making a heavy 6-8 oz cup that's somewhere between an americano and turkish strength-wise.  I get beans ground at 3 and use two and a half heaping tablespoons per brew.

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 05-12-2016, 11:24 AM
#15
  • greyhawk
  • Senior Member
  • Southern California
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(05-12-2016, 10:52 AM)WegianWarrior Wrote: Just made a cup in the aeropress right now - about four minutes including boiling water and washing up, and that includes a 90 second steeping (which seems close to ideal with the fine ground dark espresso I got in the house).

One major drawback though; even using what Aerobie calls "four cups", my mug isn't filled up to the top  Dodgy

Yes, you have to top it off with hot water. That's one reason why I went back to the "non-inverted" method--some coffee drips through while it is steeping, and I add more once or twice, so more of the water actually comes in contact with the grounds. (I don't like adding hot water after it's brewed.) I think my mug is 16 or 17 oz. and it comes out about right.

The grind does make a big difference, also. I sometimes use some Lavazza that is pre-ground and it is finer than optimal, so less water goes through the grounds while it is steeping. And I must confess to using a fair amount of half and half. Blush

I do use one of my french presses on the weekends, but the Aeropress is perfect for weekday mornings.

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 05-12-2016, 12:10 PM
#16
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(05-12-2016, 10:36 AM)Mr_Smartepants Wrote: I'm tempted by this.  At home I've got two french press setups but they're a pain to clean.  In my office I've got a Delonghi espresso machine but it makes a racket.
Seems like the aeropress solves both these problems.
It does indeed! The ease of cleanup is why I switched in the office (most days, sometimes I want that French press taste).

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 05-12-2016, 01:45 PM
#17
  • Harvey
  • Senior Member
  • North Hills CA
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Just wondering ...besides the clean up...what makes the Aeropress better than the French Press...concept seems the same...method of brewing similar...I know the grind is different but any other factors I,m missing?

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 05-12-2016, 07:37 PM
#18
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I'm sure there are different answers to that question Harvey, but for me it's the easy clean-up and portability of it since I'm quite often away from home.

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 05-12-2016, 07:45 PM
#19
  • Harvey
  • Senior Member
  • North Hills CA
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Yah that makes sense...also Glass vs plastic.....mesh filter vs paper.......and  ease of packing...Got it..thanks Harvey

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 05-12-2016, 09:27 PM
#20
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It isn't by its nature 'better', but the coffee comes out different than French press - different grind coarseness, brew times, paper filter, possibly the brew ratio depending on who is making it. I think the coffee being brewed plays into it too. Some I like as FP, some as espresso, and some as AP. In fact, when I buy a new coffee I brew it all three ways to see what's the best method.

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