05-20-2016, 04:45 PM
#1
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
User Info
I understand, if not partake in collecting vintage razors. My interest is the ancestry of modern razors and, if some older models  retain a feature of advantage. Example: I know a Hoffritz slant is highly collectable and the wartime Lutz razors repackaged have a mild and aggressive side that inspired IKON to revive this feature. My current pet ( until tomorrow when the Mergress arrives) is a Merkur slant. So, aside from the pleasures of vintage styling and packaging are some grandfather razors holding back on a few checkers moves yet unknown to the grandkid?

2 3,171
Reply
 05-20-2016, 09:14 PM
#2
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
User Info
(05-20-2016, 04:45 PM)kav Wrote: I understand, if not partake in collecting vintage razors. My interest is the ancestry of modern razors and, if some older models  retain a feature of advantage. Example: I know a Hoffritz slant is highly collectable and the wartime Lutz razors repackaged have a mild and aggressive side that inspired IKON to revive this feature. My current pet ( until tomorrow when the Mergress arrives) is a Merkur slant. So, aside from the pleasures of vintage styling and packaging are some grandfather razors holding back on a few checkers moves yet unknown to the grandkid?

An indirect answer:  Look at the very complex shape of the “standard” double-edge razor blade.  King Gillette easily could have designed it as a straight rectangle, probably with rounded corners the better to avoid sharp points, and just two or three holes to position the blade between a top cap and a baseplate.  But the incredibly complex center slot of the blade, with some round cut-outs and some diamond-shaped cut-outs, and notches at all four corners of the blade, allow a wide variety of designs.  

My current favorite DE razor, the Feather AS-D2, is among the minority of rasors that does not have three round posts in the top cap, but instead has one long threaded post in the center and two long fins to each side of that post.  As shipped, the AS-D2 has a baseplate with two long and skinny wells that correspond to and receive the top cap’s fins.  I have an alternate baseplate for the AS-D2, an iKon Deluxe Open Comb baseplate, that can be swapped seamlessly into the AS-D2, but, in place of the AS-D2 stock baseplate’s wells, the iKon OC baseplate has a single slot that runs the entire length of the baseplate to accept the Feather top cap’s fins. 

At the extreme four corners of the AS-D2’s top cap, there are four square protruberances that mate directly with four same-shape depressions at the corners of the razor’s baseplate, having passed through the aforementioned notches that are at all four corners of every DE blade, but which razor designers rarely, if ever, “use.”  By using the notches, Feather was able to clamp the blade very tightly very near to its cutting edge.  Because of that inconspicuous design feature, the Feather AS-D2 razor tames the notoriously aggressive or dangerous Feather Hi-Stainless blades, which are very thin and are liable to flex and flap in other applications, to behave like good children, and users comment how smooth and well-behaved the Feather blades are when used in the Feather AS-D2 razor, compared to how they perform in other DE razors.

0 1,052
Reply
 05-21-2016, 04:24 AM
#3
User Info
(05-20-2016, 09:14 PM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(05-20-2016, 04:45 PM)kav Wrote: I understand, if not partake in collecting vintage razors. My interest is the ancestry of modern razors and, if some older models  retain a feature of advantage. Example: I know a Hoffritz slant is highly collectable and the wartime Lutz razors repackaged have a mild and aggressive side that inspired IKON to revive this feature. My current pet ( until tomorrow when the Mergress arrives) is a Merkur slant. So, aside from the pleasures of vintage styling and packaging are some grandfather razors holding back on a few checkers moves yet unknown to the grandkid?

An indirect answer:  Look at the very complex shape of the “standard” double-edge razor blade.  King Gillette easily could have designed it as a straight rectangle, probably with rounded corners the better to avoid sharp points, and just two or three holes to position the blade between a top cap and a baseplate.  But the incredibly complex center slot of the blade, with some round cut-outs and some diamond-shaped cut-outs, and notches at all four corners of the blade, allow a wide variety of designs.  

Funny you should say that... 
[Image: 137212d1375825618-gillette-de-1929-2369-...-blade.jpg]

Today's blade shape is a compromise to fit in a multitude of different razors, some from Gillette and some from other companies - the long slot for example is as far as I understand meant to make it usable in Gillettes TTO-razors.

3 4,374
Reply
 05-21-2016, 05:05 AM
#4
User Info
I love the Feather AS-D2 yet in my infinite wisdom (or lack thereof) decided to buy the Pils which "tames" the blade too.

36 886
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)