06-07-2016, 04:14 PM
#1
  • Teddyboy
  • Guilty, with an explanation
  • NYC
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I have noticed that many fellow shavers will disclose a razor's blade gap as an indication of aggressiveness or mildness.  My question is whether or not blade gap values from different brands/styles of razors are reliable indicators of the aggressiveness/mildness of the shave.

For example, in the Above the Tie, the H, M and R blade gaps are provided.  Given the near identical design of the entire head [other than blade gap], I can understand how the blade gap correlate well with aggressiveness.  The question is [as an example] would an ATT M having a given blade gap shave similarly to a Fatboy or Progress adjusted to the same blade gap?  I personally have my doubts.  I think that additional design features of a razor head have a significant effect on a given blade gap's performance.

 What say your?

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 06-07-2016, 04:18 PM
#2
  • pbrmhl
  • Active Member
  • Seattle
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Blade exposure and blade angle are two other major factors. Perhaps some one can pull up photos demonstrating these factors.

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 06-07-2016, 05:01 PM
#3
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ATT can use it as a relevant metric I think since the angle and other relative geometries don't change. I might be wrong though.

Gap is more of a general indicator in my opinion than a hard and fast absolute determination of aggressiveness. 

It can give you an idea, but it's far from the total picture.

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 06-07-2016, 06:01 PM
#4
  • Teddyboy
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  • NYC
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(06-07-2016, 05:01 PM)bakerbarber Wrote: ATT can use it as a relevant metric I think since the angle and other relative geometries don't change. I might be wrong though.

Gap is more of a general indicator in my opinion than a hard and fast absolute determination of aggressiveness. 

It can give you an idea, but it's far from the total picture.

This is also what I am thinking.  Just want a consensus if possible.  Thanks.

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 06-07-2016, 08:03 PM
#5
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(06-07-2016, 05:01 PM)bakerbarber Wrote: ATT can use it as a relevant metric I think since the angle and other relative geometries don't change. I might be wrong though.

Gap is more of a general indicator in my opinion than a hard and fast absolute determination of aggressiveness. 

It can give you an idea, but it's far from the total picture.

Signs011    Although different razors can have the same numerical blade gap, I highly doubt it will be a similar shave experience.

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 06-08-2016, 04:31 AM
#6
  • jtmke
  • Ex shaving hater
  • milwaukee
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I believe there is far more to the aggressiveness of a razor than gap. Exposure, angle, weight even all play a role.

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 06-08-2016, 07:57 AM
#7
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(06-08-2016, 04:31 AM)jtmke Wrote: I believe there is far more to the aggressiveness of a razor than gap. Exposure, angle, weight even all play a role.

Signs011

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 06-08-2016, 08:33 AM
#8
  • kav
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I am slowly increasing the blade gap on my new Mergress each shave. I don't know if 'aggressiveness' fully describes the 'efficiency' of the shave. I've discovered some higher settings are more comfortable than a 'milder' razor ie my Edwin Jagger- and I do like that tool very much still. We all know the one constant in shaving are the multiple variables of blades,soaps
and razor that in the alchemy of trial and error find magical combinations for each individual. No doubt, I will reach 10, slit my throat and reconcile with Edwin for a few weeks.

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 06-08-2016, 12:15 PM
#9
  • Teddyboy
  • Guilty, with an explanation
  • NYC
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Thank you for your thoughts on this subject.  It seems unanimous that blade gap ain't the entire story.  This just begs the question why some people proffer it as a bona fide index of shave predictability.

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 06-08-2016, 12:41 PM
#10
  • gp569900
  • Senior Member
  • Franklin, TN USA
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I would have to agree that blade gap is just one small piece of "aggressiveness" of a razor.  As an illustration, based solely upon my experience, I find the ATT M2 almost as aggressive as the R1 even though the blade gaps are significantly different.  I also find that both of those razors are significantly more aggressive to me than the Edwin Jagger DE89L.  The EJ seems very mild to me compared to even the M2, even though the blade gap is supposedly 3x that of the M2.

Also, take the Merkur Futur on the lowest setting, 1.  It supposedly has a much more aggressive blade gap than the ATT H1.  However, it is milder than the ATT M2 on my face by far.  The supposed gap on the Futur on setting 1 is 1.12mm while the M2 is only .25mm.  

I would definitely say that geometry, angle, weight, design, etc. have as much of an impact as blade gap.

This is based upon my experience only.

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 06-08-2016, 12:43 PM
#11
  • Mr_Smartepants
  • Senior Member
  • Cambridgeshire, UK (CONUS post address)
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 06-08-2016, 01:26 PM
#12
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(06-07-2016, 08:03 PM)celestino Wrote:
(06-07-2016, 05:01 PM)bakerbarber Wrote: ATT can use it as a relevant metric I think since the angle and other relative geometries don't change. I might be wrong though.

Gap is more of a general indicator in my opinion than a hard and fast absolute determination of aggressiveness. 

It can give you an idea, but it's far from the total picture.

Signs011    Although different razors can have the same numerical blade gap, I highly doubt it will be a similar shave experience.


Yes, that!

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 06-11-2016, 08:49 AM
#13
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I think a lot of the confusion is engendered by the fact that adjustable DE razors (i.e. Merkur Progress) go from mild to aggressive by the simple expedient of altering the blade gap. I don't doubt that there are many other factors to consider when comparing two separate razors, but it seems logical (to me, anyway) that blade gap looms very large in effecting aggressiveness. 

So, to sum up -- blade gap isn't the only factor to consider, but it's way ahead of whatever's in second place.

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 06-11-2016, 09:13 AM
#14
  • kav
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It is said Marie Antoinette stepped on the headsman's foot and said 'excuse moi, monsieur' before kneeling. I wonder; did the executioners of old sit in the tavern drinking wine and discussing axe geometry, handle length and le Gillete slides?

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 06-11-2016, 10:40 AM
#15
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(06-11-2016, 09:13 AM)kav Wrote: did the executioners of old sit in the tavern drinking wine and discussing axe geometry, handle length and le Gillete slides?


Only the good ones did, those that were competent enough in their craft to command bribes for the cleanest, most painless kills. Angel

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 06-11-2016, 04:56 PM
#16
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Marie Antoinette was executed via a GUILLOTINE on October 16, 1793.

The guillotine continued to be used long after the Revolution and remained France's standard method of judicial execution until the abolition of capital punishment in 1981. The last person guillotined in France was Hamida Djandoubi, on 10 September 1977.

The machine was successful as it was considered a humane form of execution, contrasting with the methods used in pre-revolutionary, Ancien Régime France. In France, before the guillotine, members of the nobility were beheaded with a sword or axe, which often took two or more blows to kill the condemned, while commoners were usually hanged, which could take minutes or longer.
The guillotine was thus perceived to deliver an immediate death without risk of suffocation.

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 06-11-2016, 05:18 PM
#17
  • kav
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Maybe It was Anne Bolyn or Faye Dunnaway in THE THREE MUSKETEERS- or was it FOUR? I don't think it was Jane Mansfield- no, definitly not. She was in a car wreck.

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 06-11-2016, 06:03 PM
#18
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On my ATT H2, it makes a huge impact, not so much on my TTO's

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