07-13-2016, 09:08 PM
#1
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I discovered this recipe one night whilst battling insomnia a few years back, I turned on PBS and watched "America's Test Kitchen" I immediately went to Walmart bought the ingredients and baked Gingersnaps at 2am. I tend to make them on the smaller side about 1" so they're more "bite-sized" I use a melon baller for consistency sake. I baked about 200 cookies and brought them in for my co-workers, they were all gone within a few hours. I add a little more than a pinch of cayenne because I enjoy spicy food. 

Gingersnaps
Makes 80 1½-inch cookies
2 1/2 cups (12 1/2 ounces) all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
12 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 tablespoons ground ginger
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1/4 teaspoon pepper
pinch cayenne
1 1/4 cups packed (8 3/4 ounces) dark brown sugar
1/4 cup molasses
2 tablespoons finely grated fresh ginger
1 large egg plus 1 large yolk
1/2 cup (3 1/2 ounces) granulated sugar

1. Whisk flour, baking soda, and salt together in bowl. Heat butter in 10-inch skillet over medium heat until melted. Lower heat to medium-low and continue to cook, swirling pan frequently, until foaming subsides and butter is just beginning to brown, 2 to 4 minutes. Transfer butter to large bowl and whisk in ground ginger, cinnamon, cloves, pepper, and cayenne. Cool slightly, about 2 minutes. Add brown sugar, molasses, and fresh ginger to butter mixture and whisk to combine. Add egg and yolk and whisk to combine. Add flour mixture and stir until just combined. Cover dough tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate until firm, about 1 hour.

2. Adjust oven racks to upper-middle and lower-middle positions and heat oven to 300 degrees. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Place granulated sugar in shallow baking dish or pie plate. Divide dough into heaping teaspoon portions; roll dough into 1-inch balls. Working in batches of 10, roll balls in sugar to coat. Evenly space dough balls on prepared baking sheets, 20 dough balls per sheet.

3. Place 1 sheet on upper rack and bake for 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, transfer partially baked top sheet to lower rack, rotating 180 degrees, and place second sheet of dough balls on upper rack. Continue to bake until cookies on lower tray just begin to darken around edges, 10 to 12 minutes longer. Remove lower sheet of cookies and shift upper sheet to lower rack and continue to bake until cookies begin to darken around edges, 15 to 17 minutes. Slide baked cookies, still on parchment, to wire rack and cool completely before serving. Cool baking sheets slightly and repeat step 2 with remaining dough balls.

TO MAKE AHEAD: Dough can be refrigerated for up to 2 days or frozen for up to 1 month. Let dough stand at room temperature for 30 minutes before shaping. Let frozen dough thaw overnight in the refrigerator before proceeding with recipe. Cooled cookies can be stored at room temperature for up to 2 weeks in airtight container.

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 07-14-2016, 01:37 PM
#2
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I saw them make them, but so far haven't had the time myself. I love gingersnaps, but my waistline not so much. I need to pick and choose what I cook at my age. It goes on so easily and comes off... well...  it doesn't. Hence, the "time" factor. :-)

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 07-14-2016, 08:08 PM
#3
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(07-14-2016, 01:37 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: I saw them make them, but so far haven't had the time myself. I love gingersnaps, but my waistline not so much. I need to pick and choose what I cook at my age. It goes on so easily and comes off... well...  it doesn't. Hence, the "time" factor. :-)

They are quite time consuming I don't bake them very often so when I do I bake a big batch. I would have never thought to put cayenne, and black pepper in a cookie to add spice.

 I went out and bought the America's Test Kitchen family cookbook after trying a few of their recipes I found online. So far everything I have made from it has come out awesome. They have a really good muffin recipe that I use when my coworkers request muffins when we're working days, the recipe calls for no fat/low fat plain yogurt. I just toss in some blueberries and it's good to go. 

I enjoy baking a lot more than cooking, so when I'm in the mood I bake eat 1 or 2 of whatever I've made and bring the rest to work, I find I don't crave it as much if I make it. I baked 17 1/2 dozen cookies one time for a coworkers going away party. Haha.

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 07-15-2016, 04:17 AM
#4
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Yes, over the years I've found that when ATK publishes a recipe that it always turns out fantastic. Uniformly good results every time.

Every once in awhile I'll make their "donut muffins". Delicious!

My only gripes with ATK is their inability to figure out how to use the Ankarsrum mixer and a resultant serious downgrading of a clearly superior machine, and their rejection of ceramic BBQ/grills.  Whoops, one more... their use of unlit briquets in their Weber grill (I don't remember the recipe). I can taste the off taste as briquets light and it's as though whatever cooked was cooked inside the tailpipe of a diesel vehicle. It's just nasty.

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 07-15-2016, 05:45 AM
#5
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(07-15-2016, 04:17 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Yes, over the years I've found that when ATK publishes a recipe that it always turns out fantastic. Uniformly good results every time.

Every once in awhile I'll make their "donut muffins". Delicious!

My only gripes with ATK is their inability to figure out how to use the Ankarsrum mixer and a resultant serious downgrading of a clearly superior machine, and their rejection of ceramic BBQ/grills.  Whoops, one more... their use of unlit briquets in their Weber grill (I don't remember the recipe). I can taste the off taste as briquets light and it's as though whatever cooked was cooked inside the tailpipe of a diesel vehicle. It's just nasty.

Haha, yeah in my younger years I didn't have grilling experience I've thrown things directly on a grill with new brickettes... gotta love that lighter fluid taste. I use a kitchen-aid so the recipes don't give me any problems.

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 07-15-2016, 10:47 AM
#6
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Yeah, I have to convert them for the Ankarsrum. It's not difficult to do.

I'm thinking about those donut muffins and salivating.

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 07-15-2016, 03:46 PM
#7
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(07-15-2016, 10:47 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Yeah, I have to convert them for the Ankarsrum. It's not difficult to do.

I'm thinking about those donut muffins and salivating.

That's funny. I'm relatively newish to baking I had never heard of an Ankarsrum mixer, how do you like it?

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