07-17-2016, 02:24 PM
#1
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I have been really trying to feel what makes my favorite brushes really shine. An easy one for me to point out is that I have one HMW 3 band knot that really makes lather incredibly easy and shines even with some of my soaps that require a bit more elbow grease and work. I am not sure if it is the combination of the density and round shape of the knot, but it does half of the work for me, and I usually don't mind a bit of focus in the process of getting that lather in the best spot.

Another thing I have been taking note of is how the knot bends and splays with varying amounts of pressure. A good knot can excel at a certain point where your pressing that knot on the skin. The difference I have found is that I may start by using the top tips, light pressure, as little splay as possible, and then as I slowly hydrate the lather, I can then work the lather that hides deeper in the knot. I do this by pushing the knot open a bit more and follow by painting and slapping the lather around. 

Lastly, I recently had a new addition to the den and I thought I would fall in love with it but when I shaving, the second application of lather after the first pass was a bit lack luster. It was like I was wondering "where did all of the luxury go?" Obviously, I could adjust the amount of loading and will do so but it did remind me that I really enjoy a brush that makes lather application seamless.

What do you love about your favorite badgers and how do you use them?

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 07-17-2016, 04:46 PM
#2
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Great question !

I now own 16 synthetics, and they now are a steady part of my brush den.

They perform so well now for me, that I could at some stage see me selling all my prime badgers, but not there just yet.

FYI I only own badgers from 3 brands now: Simpsons (12 x Chubby 2 and Chubby 3), Thäter and Shavemac.

What I still find superior in my prime badgers are:

+ Ability to hold water (water retention)

+ Ability to hold on to heat (heat retention)

+ Face feel - I still think prime badgers have that special feel to them, whether they are soft or more rough, they just have that special feel, that no synthetics or baors come close to having

+ Ability to bloom more naturally during the lather process. I don't see the same bloom with synthetics and boars. Hard to describe, but the bloom of a prime well made badger knot is just something special, especially if you face lather. Synthetics and boars bloom too, but not in same delightfull way as a prime badger does.

+ The whole look of a prime badger brush, it just looks naturally more great and luxurious to my eye, than a boar and a synthetic does. Boars have always looked kind of ugly, synthetics look more uniform, but also more artificial, not natural, because they aren't.

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 07-17-2016, 06:04 PM
#3
  • jtmke
  • Ex shaving hater
  • milwaukee
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Great question. 

I am all over the map. 
I love my floppy soft Kents. My Chubbys , my Thaters and Shavemacs. I have a fondness for super soft tips with no scrub or scritch. That does not to me mean no back bone. I would say I have 5 or 6 with outstanding backbone, another 10 in the middle and 4 floppy brushes. For me soft tips and handle design are tops. I appreciate brushes that don't hog lather. I tend towards brushes that are 24 to 26mm knot width but do enjoy a couple smaller and a couple in the 30+ range. 

I know thi is a rambling answer but I said I was all over the map. I do love my badgers. I have never warmed to any other type of brush hair.

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 07-17-2016, 07:15 PM
#4
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I do love my badgers. And I should be clear - I load heavy. Very heavy. I use a combination of circular & paint-brush motions to create lather on each of my 4 passes, and like the OP - I use the whole brush (vs. just the tips). I don't know what a lather-hog is, as each of my brushes have spilled their secrets and are generous with releasing lather. 

Shavemac 26x50 D01-3 band: dense, soft yet scrubby; the most backbone ever! I love this brush, especially when I haven't shaved for a few days. 
Simpsons chubby 2 Manchurian 27x50: dense, good bloom with soft-tips, some scrub, and excellent flow-through. Splays well, a joy to use. 
Thäter 28x52 3 band: pillow soft, super large knot. Splays very easy; better with soft soaps/croaps. Great when the face needs a break. 

Since each of my three badgers exhibits different strengths - I reach for them at different times. I do have a synthetic, but it doesn't see regular use. While I do occasionally swoon over a paladin release, I don't know that I'll be getting an experience I don't already have.

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 07-17-2016, 10:18 PM
#5
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(07-17-2016, 07:15 PM)mike_the_kraken Wrote: I do love my badgers. And I should be clear - I load heavy. Very heavy. I use a combination of circular & paint-brush motions to create lather on each of my 4 passes, and like the OP - I use the whole brush (vs. just the tips). I don't know what a lather-hog is, as each of my brushes have spilled their secrets and are generous with releasing lather. 

Mike, do you load on the soap puck using the same technique?

I find that I am loading soap in back and fourth to start the process of keeping the lather smooth and tight. Although, it does seem to keep the lather in the tub and outside the knot. That is where I find the circles come in and function. When I circle the brush around, it slowly pulls in the lather and begins to bloom the knot because it moves the lather in between the hair. I typically don't do a ton of circling at once and will do a couple circles one way, pull the knot off the puck, and then press back down, then going the other way a couple swirls.

So many seem to get up in arms when the Simpson brushes come with a instruction that you should only use the paint strokes. It seems that it is perfectly fine for a brush to handle some circles but I do think that amount of pressure and lack of care we might use as unknowing beginners can damage a knot.

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 07-19-2016, 07:26 AM
#6
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first nice brush was a badger kent bk 8 and omg was it soft and fun to play with.  set me on my journey.  now when I find a great brush I am thrilled by the hunt and finding of that special something it provides.  This has led me to love Thaders, older m&f and simpsons.  But cycling through all my brushes again and again I find something special in each one.  hair quality, lathe work, handle material, design so many reasons to love this part of shaving.  Just never found synthetics to my liking although I use one to "face wash" with skin cleaner once in awhile. now regarding boar it just looks like a second stepchild of the wrong side of the animal hair pen.

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 07-19-2016, 04:53 PM
#7
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(07-17-2016, 10:18 PM)zaclikestoshave Wrote:
(07-17-2016, 07:15 PM)mike_the_kraken Wrote: I do love my badgers. And I should be clear - I load heavy. Very heavy. I use a combination of circular & paint-brush motions to create lather on each of my 4 passes, and like the OP - I use the whole brush (vs. just the tips). I don't know what a lather-hog is, as each of my brushes have spilled their secrets and are generous with releasing lather. 

Mike, do you load on the soap puck using the same technique?

I load using circular motions from the puck, have never tried paintbrush strokes there. I'm kind of on autopilot until I start to feel the pasty, proto-lather form.

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 07-20-2016, 05:57 AM
#8
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(07-17-2016, 04:46 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: Great question !

I now own 16 synthetics, and they now are a steady part of my brush den.

They perform so well now for me, that I could at some stage see me selling all my prime badgers, but not there just yet.

Uh-oh, Claus have you stopped taking your medication again?!?!?! I'll believe that when I see it my friend! Tongue

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 07-20-2016, 07:01 AM
#9
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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People who recommend paint strokes should confine their commercial activities to selling paint brushes.  VP brushes in Germany DO make paint brushes. They, and Rooney have been around as long, and longer than anyone and don't mention such nonsense. I can just imagine Paul leaning over Vincent's shoulder and swearing in Peruvian Spanish about swirling his brushes to paint stars. We share creation with creatures who lend their uniqueness to our benefit; horses to ride, flowers to smell and badgers for brushes. I pick up my badgers, a wild animal not tamed or herded and
have a connection with that creation. It reminds me of the divine duty of stewardship.

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 07-20-2016, 07:42 AM
#10
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Ah Kav, your gripe with Simpson again, will it never end or be let go?  I hope so, I think you'd be happier if you could let it go.
As far as the functionality of paintbrush strokes goes, I do find them to be superior when I am laying down and smoothing out my lather.  Like Zac, I find that I like circular motions to build and keep lather in the knot, while I find that paintbrush strokes excel at applying the lather to the face.
All that being said, whichever way you like to lay down the lather, circular, paintbrush, or some combination of both it will work.

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 07-21-2016, 05:04 PM
#11
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This might be (probably is) error on my part, but I find that when I do paint brush strokes, the flattening of the bristles releases the water in the knot, creating a lot of mess and drip everywhere. Comparatively, when I do swirling strokes that same water incorporates into the lather.

Hmm

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 07-21-2016, 06:27 PM
#12
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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vox clammatis in deserto

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 07-22-2016, 03:54 AM
#13
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(07-21-2016, 05:04 PM)crazindndude Wrote: This might be (probably is) error on my part, but I find that when I do paint brush strokes, the flattening of the bristles releases the water in the knot, creating a lot of mess and drip everywhere. Comparatively, when I do swirling strokes that same water incorporates into the lather.

Hmm


I agree, circular strokes excel at creating lather while paintbrush strokes effectively lay the lather down. Try the paintbrush strokes after you've fully incorporated the water, you'll notice there is no water release once it's been incorporated.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 07-22-2016, 04:07 AM
#14
  • beamon
  • Active Member
  • Greenville, SC USA
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(07-20-2016, 05:57 AM)merkur man Wrote:
(07-17-2016, 04:46 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: Great question !

I now own 16 synthetics, and they now are a steady part of my brush den.

They perform so well now for me, that I could at some stage see me selling all my prime badgers, but not there just yet.

Uh-oh, Claus have you stopped taking your medication again?!?!?! I'll believe that when I see it my friend! Tongue
Boy, is this some worldwide economy or what? A well known collector of Omega mechanical watches was saying, recently, that he has liquidated his collection! Is only keeping one for daily wearing.

Hate to see you do that, Claus. It would remove you from the badger brush banter from which we learn so much.

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 07-22-2016, 04:56 PM
#15
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Watches the BST for a sudden badger influx...

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 07-23-2016, 04:38 AM
#16
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(07-22-2016, 04:56 PM)mike_the_kraken Wrote: Watches the BST for a sudden badger influx...

From Claus? They would be top of the line I'd bet.

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