07-22-2016, 05:46 AM
#1
  • beamon
  • Active Member
  • Greenville, SC USA
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Interested in your methods of defunking a new badger. Have the $30.00 Sterling incoming and have read about the warm detergent soaks, but do any proprietary products (Simple Green etc.) do an especially good job? How many 'treatments' would he necesssary to completely rid the brush of  its odoriferous heritage? Any input greatly appreciated.

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 07-22-2016, 05:51 AM
#2
  • ben74
  • Senior Member
  • Perth, Australia
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I simply palm lather and rinse with my least favourite soap as many times as necessary until there is no more funk...

Three times usually does it for me and helps break the brush in too.

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 07-22-2016, 05:58 AM
#3
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I lather with my favorite soap a few times until the 'grime' stops coming out (the lather will be dark the first couple of runs and will start looking normal again).  After which I lather a final time and leave the lather in the knot overnight and rinse out in the AM.

Works wonders for me.

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 07-22-2016, 05:59 AM
#4
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(07-22-2016, 05:51 AM)ben74 Wrote: I simply palm lather and rinse with my least favourite soap as many times as necessary until there is no more funk...

Three times usually does it for me and helps break the brush in too.

This.  Badgers to me are much easier to get initial funk out of than boars so you shouldn't have a problem.  Just a few lathers and it'll be good to go.

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 07-22-2016, 06:01 AM
#5
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(07-22-2016, 05:51 AM)ben74 Wrote: I simply palm lather and rinse with my least favourite soap as many times as necessary until there is no more funk...


Me too.

Especially stubborn ones can benefit from sitting overnight full of lather once or twice. Standing up in a clean lather bowl in case they drip.

Eventually the offending odors rinse out with the sacrificial lather.

Dish soap can speed up the process but it's a little too harsh in my experience and regular shave soap will do if that's what you have. 

Prorasso White works very well for me. It's not very expensive and it is not very strongly scented like cologne or anything else that would cover up more than remove the actual smell.

I'm pretty sensitive to the new brush funk. I have had some brushes that I only test lathered once. Others took me weeks to get them fresh enough to put to service.

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 07-22-2016, 06:06 AM
#6
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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I roll out of bed to the smell of formaldahyde soaked new carpeting. My idiot neighbor is warming up his corvette engine for 30 minutes ( must take care of baby) and the fumes seep in my window ( See earlier thread about canned goo uses). I have to clean Pyewacket's litter tray. Now my neighbor is smoking a cigarette while standing right outside my window talking on his cancer causing cellphone ( I have one of those strong signal areas like new Age Power Spots). So I close the window and breathe new carpeting. Now the smoke alarm is going off as Teflon burns on a new frying pan my mother bought instead of eggs to last the month. She hates my cast iron Lodge because it's heavy and smells of seasoned oil. My other neighbors moved out and the guy who refinishes showers just pulled up with chemicals that make a meth lab tame. 
I flee all of this for a few minutes with my morning shave. I pick up my badger, fluff the hair in my palm ( must take care of baby) and smell the faded, but native smell of creation before choosing which soap to use.
Solution for funk? use it.

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 07-22-2016, 06:41 AM
#7
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I don't follow any defunking process.  I just shave with the new brush 3 days in a row.

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 07-22-2016, 06:45 AM
#8
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I recently received my Stirling badger and I'm almost through the de-funking process. I just Palm-lathered it about 5 times with a strong smelling, hard soap. Really great brush for the money. Enjoy!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 07-22-2016, 07:24 AM
#9
  • beamon
  • Active Member
  • Greenville, SC USA
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Thanks, so far, gents. I'm chuckling, however, because even defunking a brush is a YMMV task. Schooled in the sciences, I can't believe how imprecise the techniques are for this hobby. That very fact is probably what makes it interesting to such a broad population sample.

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 07-22-2016, 07:49 AM
#10
  • gp569900
  • Senior Member
  • Franklin, TN USA
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(07-22-2016, 07:24 AM)beamon Wrote: Thanks, so far, gents. I'm chuckling, however, because even defunking a brush is a YMMV task. Schooled in the sciences, I can't believe how imprecise the techniques are for this hobby. That very fact is probably what makes it interesting to such a broad population sample.

Many people suggest using Borax.  A soak and agitate for about thirty minutes seems to work.

As for proprietary products, I have and use Zartgefühl Brush-Cleansing Soap.  This is a soap specifically designed by an German soapmaker to clean and condition shaving and makeup brushes.  I have used it to clean new and to recondition older brushes.  It works wonderfully.  Ingredients are:  Sodium Palmate, Sodium Shea Butterate, Sodium Cacao Butterate, Sodium Cacoate, Kaolin, Parfum.

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 07-22-2016, 07:54 AM
#11
  • kav
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  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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I looked at that product too. Then I looked at the ingredients in my regular soaps.

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 07-22-2016, 07:59 AM
#12
  • gp569900
  • Senior Member
  • Franklin, TN USA
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(07-22-2016, 07:54 AM)kav Wrote: I looked at that product too. Then I looked at the ingredients in my regular soaps.

I agree, it could have many of the same ingredients, depending upon the soaps you have.  I found that it leaves the brush with a "Fresh"  scent.  I like it because I don't have to use a heavily perfumed soap to masque the scent with a deeper scent.

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 07-22-2016, 10:49 AM
#13
  • ajc347
  • Senior Member
  • Exeter, UK
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I've tried a number of approaches over the years and, for me, the best solution is the simplest one.

A single palm lather with a mild shampoo (such as Johnson's Baby Shampoo) to get any loose hairs out of the knot, and then use the brush as normal.

The funky smell will disappear soon enough after a few uses.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 07-22-2016, 05:02 PM
#14
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There are varying degrees of funk amongst different brushes. I had a thäter come in with zero smell, whilst my Simpsons chubby was attracting local wildlife. Around 3-4 palm-lathers/shaves and all aromas were neutral. No telling what will occur if you have a cat Smile

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 07-22-2016, 06:19 PM
#15
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(07-22-2016, 06:41 AM)TheLegalRazor Wrote: I don't follow any defunking process.  I just shave with the new brush 3 days in a row.

Same here.  I grew up on a farm and have smelled much worse.

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 07-22-2016, 06:55 PM
#16
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I never really cared. I just use the new brushes as they come in. As long as the water is not turning brown while the brush is soaking you are good. This is why you soak your brush gents.

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 07-22-2016, 06:58 PM
#17
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(07-22-2016, 05:51 AM)ben74 Wrote: I simply palm lather and rinse with my least favourite soap as many times as necessary until there is no more funk...

Three times usually does it for me and helps break the brush in too.

This is exactly what I do to. Ive never put dish soap on any brush. Not to say it dont work, but I have a few bad soaps I use instead.

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 07-22-2016, 08:03 PM
#18
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With new Badger brushes, I just do as Ben74 said, lather a few times with a soap I'm not really into. After that it's at least useable. 

My Vie-Long Epsilon White Horse was a different beast, no pun intended. That thing was HORRID. It reeked of death for several lathers. I got a tip to soak in OxyClean as directed by the manufacturer, three rounds of it, letting it dry completely between rounds.  That seemed to take care of 90% of the stench, leaving just a tiny bit of stank. I just used it as normal after that, the smell eventually dissipated.

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 07-22-2016, 10:15 PM
#19
  • kav
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There is a famous  book on horse management by a British cavalry officer killed at Balaclava. I was somewhat shocked reading an unknown fact from the Napoleonic wars. He stated they realized the French Hussars and dragoons were advancing, not from scouts but The foul stench of thousands of poorly cared for cavalry and pack horses carried on the evening breeze. British cavalry, even then renowned for it's superiority were in better shape. Even so, the French managed only one major charge while the better cared for British mounts managed three but were also totally exhausted, their mounts throwing off steam like clouds from profuse sweating. It was only the arrival of Von Blucher and the Prussians who finally tipped the outcome at Waterloo. So o.k. they can smell. On a ranch or farm it's called Animal Husbandry, or as  Yakima Canute told me ' You rode him, now you wash him and check his bedding and evening feed. Then we eat'.

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 07-23-2016, 04:36 AM
#20
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(07-22-2016, 05:46 AM)beamon Wrote: Interested in your methods of defunking a new badger. Have the $30.00 Sterling incoming and have read about the warm detergent soaks, but do any proprietary products (Simple Green etc.) do an especially good job? How many 'treatments' would he necesssary to completely rid the brush of  its odoriferous heritage? Any input greatly appreciated.

I just use them and try to get through the funk.. Lol.

Roger, you know that one soap that surprisingly (sort of) defunked one of my brand new Paladin? Nuavia blue.

The scent of that soap is so good, I'm still sniffing the knot of my once used Paladin.

There is still a hint of funk but, really the scent strength of that soap is really something else.

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