08-03-2016, 04:43 PM
#1
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I went to an art store last week to buy some brushes for oil painting, and saw these while I was browsing. Initially I thought they were horse hair because of how incredibly soft they were, but later found out that these are Chungking hog hair brushes made in Barcelona. Chungking, China is renowned for their hog hair. I could not help but wonder how it would feel to shave with one of these.  Sbathroom_grooming_shaving_100-100


[Image: dSTBO7K.jpg]

[Image: iHTdLcF.jpg]

[Image: 1XebuSo.jpg]

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 08-07-2016, 06:40 AM
#2
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Bayside, NY
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Ramon, you must report back to us after you've experimented... Confused

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 08-07-2016, 06:41 AM
#3
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Bayside, NY
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It actually looks pretty dense.

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 08-07-2016, 06:46 AM
#4
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if you think you lack time to sample properly I offer my services

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 08-07-2016, 11:22 AM
#5
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At the time, I had a budget for only the three oil-paint brushes you see in my hand above; however, I could go back and get one of those Escoda brushes, and we could PIF it on the Nook.  Note in the first photo that we have a choice of fan or bulb!    Biggrin

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 08-07-2016, 12:00 PM
#6
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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I want to see what you paint too.

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 08-07-2016, 06:10 PM
#7
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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Not to be a BORE, but wild BOARS genetic makeup is quite different from domesticated Swine. Add in the marvelous diet of acorns, butcher, smoke and age the meat for that paper thin slice of spanish heaven and that aint no ham sandwich.

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 08-07-2016, 07:34 PM
#8
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(08-07-2016, 06:10 PM)kav Wrote: Not to be a BORE, but wild BOARS genetic makeup is quite different from domesticated Swine. Add in the marvelous diet of acorns, butcher, smoke and age the meat for that paper thin slice of spanish heaven and that aint no ham sandwich.

Never was a fan of iberico ham.

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 08-07-2016, 09:16 PM
#9
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(08-07-2016, 05:18 PM)gregkw1 Wrote: You do realize that a boar is a hog it's just not domesticated. How much were they

(08-07-2016, 06:10 PM)kav Wrote: Not to be a BORE, but wild BOARS genetic makeup is quite different from domesticated Swine. Add in the marvelous diet of acorns, butcher, smoke and age the meat for that paper thin slice of spanish heaven and that aint no ham sandwich.

I don't actually remember the price. 

This is off topic, but all this made me think about why boar shaving brushes are in the white to beige hue. If you google boar and check out the images, those animals range in color from gray to black with brown thrown in between. Are the bristles of shave brushes, and hair brushes for that matter, dyed, or is a specific variety of boar used for these products? Is it actually wild boar used for these brushes or a domesticated pig?

In Spanish boar is jabali while hog/pig is cerdo. Semogue boar brushes boast "cerda pura" on the handles. I am presuming the Portuguese for boar and pig are similar to the Spanish words for these animals. In addition, boar bristle paint brushes are quite stiff while hog bristle paint brushes are significantly more flexible. Are what we call boar shaving brushes actually hog/pig shaving brushes?

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 08-07-2016, 09:29 PM
#10
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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Domesticated swine come in many colors not found in wild populations. Those pink piggies can quickly sunburn and die of heat stress if not properly managed. Bristles are more likely from either a domestic animal or bleached from wild. It would be interesting to find out. I'm guessing the term boar is a linguistic artifact from heraldry sporting fighting boars. A charging razorback is more saleable, even for a brush than Porky Pig going a b a b a that's all folks!

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