08-19-2016, 04:51 PM
#1
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Ok, spurred by a failure to sell my AoS Unscented tallow soap, and inspired by Primo's thread (http://shavenook.com/showthread.php?tid=30500) I thought I might try a similar technique.  

Though I do smoke a pipe, pipe tobacco wasn't for me.  I have continued to hope in vain for one of the artisan soap makers to make a hops essential oil scented soap, none have.  This is what I would call an intoxicating manly floral scent.  If you are familiar with brewing hops, you will understand.  They are simply awesome.  

So, I sliced the pick in half across its depth to make two narrower slices, and added an ounce of nicely fragrant Cascade hops, removed as much air as possible and bound it tight.  That was about 10.5 months ago.  Then I put it in a dark corner of the closet and forgot it.  

[Image: SQMVtXk.jpg][Image: zuRhyne.jpg]

(That's lupulin dust in the bowl, the bit that gives hops their character.  It got added.)

[Image: 74yn2DO.jpg]

Pleasantly, I rediscovered it the other day, and figured this has been sufficient time.  First shave is tomorrow.  It smells pretty damn good.  Please hear me Stirling/B&M!

[Image: gMTBtXS.jpg]

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 08-19-2016, 05:55 PM
#2
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Matt, hope it work out for you. Shy

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 08-19-2016, 06:17 PM
#3
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Looking forward to the results!

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 08-21-2016, 05:46 PM
#4
  • Viking
  • Artisan - Soap & Cosmetics
  • Ames, Iowa
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That is really cool! I am a former brewer, and this is something I've thought about in the past. Thanks for bringing it up. 

Even though I'm not brewing, I have a brewery right across the street from me, I think I may have to see if they'll let me use some hops to give this a go.

Very interested to hear how it ended up!

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 08-21-2016, 06:05 PM
#5
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[Image: 1ccdd3e445e728a803a0914fc4fdfacd.jpg]

Two shaves in, and results are mixed.  The puck gives off a very nice hops aroma, even after the surface hop material was scrubbed off by the brush.  But the scent doesn't translate nearly as strongly in the lather.  You can see some hop leaf fragments on the counter.  Happy about the scent of the puck in its container, but not the lather.  

One sidebar, the proteins in the hops should if anything, bolster the lather if it behaves similarly to beer, although it may be of negligible impact.

Ultimately, looking for more scent, so I have ordered some hop extract to add in a few drops and see if it helps the lather.  

I am afraid that most soap makers may not have any brewing experience, and may not fully understand the full scent of a pungent, intense hop like Cascade or Amarillo, Citra, Simcoe, etc.  Many of these have their own inherent complexity that might not accord with a perfumer trying to layer or blend scents in the soap.

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 09-08-2016, 10:46 AM
#6
  • RSP1
  • Active Member
  • Western NY
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That's really cool - please keep updating.

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 09-20-2016, 07:28 PM
#7
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Thanks for your patience with the delay in updating.  I have used up about 25% of the puck so far.  I did some experimentation with hop extract to see how that would affect the scent.  

By way of explanation, two points to add.  First, the puck still had a lovely floral scent characteristic of Cascade hops, it just wasn't coming through in the lather the way I was looking for.   Second, I like pungent scents in the shaving soap.  I always seem to want the scents to be a bit more intense on floral things.  

I tried two types of extract which both helped.  Better, but still not quite ideal.  I am hesitant to buy much more.  I can use the balance of these for brewing, but I would like to see what the botanical versions not sold for brewing smell like. The first was a Cascade oil extract from a dedicated hop supplier, and the second is called a "Hop Shot" from Northern Brewer's online shop.  The first comes out as a thin liquid, and half a dozen drops are great.  It really has the light bitter citrus-like scent of Cascade hops.  The Hop Shot comes out like a very condensed paste.  The equivalent of just a couple drops really gives it punch.  This has the grassy aroma of Saaz or Fuggles hops.  

These are a nice combination together, but there is still a little missing from the full scent of whole hops.  I am sure that I am being very picky about the scent, because hop aroma is one of my big draws in the way I make beer.  So be it.  

[Image: 6Twwh1V.jpg]

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 09-23-2016, 05:35 AM
#8
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If a soap were to be released under this profile I would surely pick one up. I understand what you are trying to achieve and think it would be a wonderful unique and overlooked scent to establish.

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 09-23-2016, 05:56 AM
#9
  • gp569900
  • Senior Member
  • Franklin, TN USA
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Very interesting. I've never really used hops. I have other soaps with plant particles, like lavender, in the soap. How does hood interact with the skin? Does it provide any benefits? Have you heard of anyone having a negative reaction? I'm very curious about your process using actual hops instead of just the essential oils.

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 09-23-2016, 06:04 AM
#10
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I have read this by Brewer. It's very interesting. Maybe Eengler will also make a comment.

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 09-23-2016, 08:21 PM
#11
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(09-23-2016, 05:56 AM)gp569900 Wrote: Very interesting. I've never really used hops. I have other soaps with plant particles, like lavender, in the soap. How does hood interact with the skin? Does it provide any benefits? Have you heard of anyone having a negative reaction?  I'm very curious about your process using actual hops instead of just the essential oils.

The virture of whole hops compared to the extract or essential seems to be in the fullness and depth of the scent.  For me, this is also similar to brewing, in that I find the same thing with whole hops, versus pellets.  A lot of folks with technical chemistry backgrounds will tell you that the T-90 pellets do everything that whole hops do, but I disagree.  Whole hops deteriorate faster, but have more depth and a more full scent to my perception.  

The key is really that lupulin dust which comes from the interior of the hop cone.  That gives the most complex and deep scent.  It would be much easier to mix it in from the start.  I can imagine though that making some kind of hot process soap might be problematic by driving off some of the essential oils that give scent.  I suspect this may have something to do with why the artisan soap makers bothers to sustain hops scented soap.  No one is tasting the soap, so a long duration is not necessary.  Crash cooling would help. 

Matt

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