08-22-2016, 07:52 AM
#1
  • beamon
  • Active Member
  • Greenville, SC USA
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On another thread, KAV said, "There is a VERY active animal rights group in the UK dedicated to preserving wild badgers, a sentiment I fully embrace while still using badger brushes. We do not need any Hyacinth Buckets dressing us down for using sickly badgers."  Rather than sidetrack that thread by replying there, I thought I'd open another to ask about the state of badgers used for brush hair. 

Please explain to a badger newbie how badger hair is harvested? Is the process harmful, in any way, to the badger? KAV inplies that the badgers used may be sickly. Would they have died, regardless? I'm far from a 'bleeding heart' on items like this, but would like to know about it. Whatever you know about the process is more than I know, so lay it on me! 

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 08-22-2016, 08:07 AM
#2
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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I was being silly in response to a post. To be blunt, badgers are harvested; a PC term up there with previously owned cars for killed. In China they are perceived as a pest animal to agriculture and used for protein and the side income of pelts. You can go on EBAY and see Pelts of different grades for legal sale here in the USA. A top grade, CASED pelt is a fun way to understand where the grades of hair originate. Presently, badger reproduction easily keeps up with predation. It is an individual tragedy but not a species issue at present.
Here in the USA/Canada the badger's status was once reversed. Farmers and Cowboys respected both Badger and Coyote ( God's dog to first peoples) as active hunters of pest prairie dogs ( ground squirrels) who's towns could destroy entire crops or snap cattle or horse legs. those two animals have been observed working together hunting prairie dogs. Badger digs, Coyote pounces when the dog flees and established alliances share.
I love badgers; both alive and on my shaving shelf.

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 08-22-2016, 08:08 AM
#3
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I'm no expert either but I can't envisage an outcome for the badger that is a good one. As far as I was aware the source of all badger hair is from China. They are apparently culled as they are considered a species that is a nuisance and over populated.
However speaking as someone who does love his badger brushes I imagine that is what I choose to believe but the reality will be much worse and much more financially driven. I think of stopping to eat meat as well as stopping buying badger brushes quite often but never fully follow through. That probably makes me as bad a person as I am weak willed but there you have it.

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 08-22-2016, 08:08 AM
#4
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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Well...there aren't any bald badgers walking around. Cool  In China, the badgers are a food source so, the meat does not go to waste.  At least that is my understanding,

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 08-22-2016, 08:17 AM
#5
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I have read that the European badger is protected in Europe.

The European badger in China is a nuisance. Most, if not all, badger brushes are made of hair from European badgers in China.

They are killed in the process.

I am not sure if they are strictly used for their pelt or whether it is a co-product and the rest of the animal is utilized as well.

I have read that wild badgers are trapped and sold as well as some are raised on farms.

I don't know for sure. I have a hard time finding reliable sources on the topic.

The overall consensus is that the badger is dead before a brush is born. 

There are Asian badgers. I don't know if there are brushes made from them though. They look distinctly different. There are also American badgers. They are protected I believe in the US. I recall reading that for a time in the past they were used for brushes but were not as good of quality as European badger and were not well liked.

I have also read recently that Mongooses are used for brushes in Japan specifically. 

I think in the early 20th century anthrax was a serious concern with regards to brushes and animal products of all kinds. Which is why nearly all vintage brushes prominently proclaim they are sterilized.

It's an interesting topic indeed. Full of speculation, conjecture, and mystery.

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 08-22-2016, 08:19 AM
#6
  • kav
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Unless you are a JAIN nature comes down to critters eating critters. Even our gut flora is a inner world of mass death and periodic annihilation. In Genesis Mankind ( old german term for all of humanity, including the ladies) was given dominion ( stewardship) of the world. Go online, well you're already here, and learn all you can about badgers. Then you are a steward and not someone avoiding the PETA protestor wearing clothing that destroys entire ecosystems.
Breakfast time here; I'm having steak and eggs and a Kona.

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 08-22-2016, 08:42 AM
#7
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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I once had a sales Rep claim that her company sold brushes in which the badgers were simply given a haircut and not harmed in any way. I would pay to see that process! 24 She also claimed that the safety razors her company sold were made in the United States when they were actually made in Pakistan. Needless to say, I do not carry that brand.

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 08-22-2016, 08:47 AM
#8
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Yeah, I think we are big enough boys to know that badgers in a country like China with a questionable human rights record by western standards are not getting out at the other end of the process alive or the luxury of getting there humanly.

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 08-22-2016, 08:53 AM
#9
  • kav
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I have a badger set ( den) right across the street unknown and unseen except one Hefe in charge of a landscaping crew. Esteban and I both love badgers and laugh at all the people who think this yuppie town dominated by their asphalt pounding herd . Mother badger comes out at night hunting earthworms, rats and
keeps the racoons ( actually more dangerous than the mated pair of coyotes) in their place while owls and fledermouse keep insects under control. Mrs badger tolerates me, after three generations when I met her grandmother who tried to chew my ankle off one night. The idea of farm raised badgers cracks me up. IF
true, the pelt would be inferior; much like several russian fur farm attempts to breed selectively.

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 08-22-2016, 08:59 AM
#10
  • beamon
  • Active Member
  • Greenville, SC USA
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Great replies, so far, thanks guys.

We had a friend in the UK, now dead, that told us about using dachshunds to root out badgers in their holes. Considering that the badger is a very formidable opponent when cornered, it speaks well of the dachshund's courage.

Suspect that badgers cause the crippling of cattle just like the groundhog does in PA where farmers used to engage us to hunt them to reduce the number of horses and cattle that would suffer broken legs from falling into groundhog holes. We would pick them off from 100 to 300 yards away with flat trajectory scoped rifles. Whistling through your teeth woud cause them to stand upright from their hole where they presented a good target for head shots. Yes, we ate 'em. They made a decent stew when prepared properly.

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 08-22-2016, 09:02 AM
#11
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Think of all that badger hair you could have had for custom brushes

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 08-22-2016, 09:02 AM
#12
  • kav
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I could look at Western nation's human rights record from a chinese perspective; look up OPIUM WARS. And with that, we have breeched forum etiquette.

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 08-22-2016, 09:04 AM
#13
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(08-22-2016, 09:02 AM)kav Wrote: I could look at Western nation's human rights record from a chinese perspective; look up OPIUM WARS. And with that, we have breeched forum etiquette.
Oh yeah, we are guilty of plenty as well.

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 08-22-2016, 09:09 AM
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(08-22-2016, 09:02 AM)kav Wrote: I could look at Western nation's human rights record from a chinese perspective; look up OPIUM WARS. And with that, we have breeched forum etiquette.
Although we are talking over 150 years ago. I'm thinking more the relationship in particular the Chinese State has with the non party population in 2016. Anyway........

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 08-22-2016, 09:10 AM
#15
  • kav
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Dachs is german for badger. If this thread holds a lesson, it is we should insure badgers both in the wild and on our shelves.

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 08-22-2016, 09:13 AM
#16
  • kav
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I'm thinking ( always a good practise before posting I do not hold to often enough) we better drop human behavior in a badger thread before a moderator grabs us by the scruff of our necks and skins us.

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 08-22-2016, 09:15 AM
#17
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Yeah, these things can easily run away from us. Except the badgers , they're running nowhere!

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 08-23-2016, 03:49 AM
#18
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Sounds like the Chinese are eating a lot of badger stew for our benefit

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 08-23-2016, 03:50 AM
#19
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Did anyone really think the caught the badger, trimmed his hairs and released him?

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 08-23-2016, 03:51 AM
#20
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Of course we all know the fate of thebadger used for our brush.  Only the horse survives contributing to our brushes

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