08-31-2016, 12:41 PM
#1
  • beamon
  • Active Member
  • Greenville, SC USA
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But, if  it were agreed that the best shaving brush in all the world, in all catagories, was a dreadful looking thing; all straggly, dull, misshapen, wrong color and whatever else you can imagine, WOULD YOU OWN IT? We, obviously, are highly interested in the appearance of our brushes and I wonder how deep that interest runs.

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 08-31-2016, 12:52 PM
#2
  • ddk13
  • Senior Member
  • USA
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Only if it was expensive and hard to get! Wink

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 08-31-2016, 12:54 PM
#3
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Most certainly.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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 08-31-2016, 01:45 PM
#4
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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I wouldn't care what it looked like if it worked better than all my other brushes. However, it would probably never appear in any of my SOTD photos. A couple of my favorite straights and one of my favorite synthetic brushes are nothing to look at.

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 08-31-2016, 01:52 PM
#5
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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No, I would knot and give any such article the brush off. Mankind, in it's better moments has always striven for beauty.

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 08-31-2016, 06:12 PM
#6
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A brush, or pretty much any object, has to be aesthetically pleasing to my eyes, for me to want to possess it. I would have to pass on such a brush.

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 08-31-2016, 07:51 PM
#7
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Is this were I post my complaints about wait lists, or 'unavailability' and the 'high prices' on the secondary market?

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 08-31-2016, 08:11 PM
#8
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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Knot if you want the secret handshake revealed.

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 08-31-2016, 08:23 PM
#9
  • greyhawk
  • Senior Member
  • Southern California
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(08-31-2016, 12:41 PM)beamon Wrote: But, if  it were agreed that the best shaving brush in all the world...

"Best" (to me) includes aesthetics. If it looked terrible, that would count against it being the "best".

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 09-01-2016, 06:39 AM
#10
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(08-31-2016, 06:12 PM)Mon Wrote: A brush, or pretty much any object, has to be aesthetically pleasing to my eyes, for me to want to possess it. I would have to pass on such a brush.

I agree, it has to be pleasant to the eye.  There are many exceptional manufactures making great knot combinations so aesthetics is important.  It's called having you cake and eating it.

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 09-01-2016, 10:33 AM
#11
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Knot conformation is as important to me as its density, and it has to be set in an eye-pleasing and comfortable-to-hold handle. All have to be present for me to keep the brush.

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 09-01-2016, 11:37 AM
#12
  • VTMAX
  • Banned
  • Woodstock, Vermont
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M&F's, Somerset & Isle of Man Simpsons, Rooney 2 Bands, Shavemac's and on. Love them but modern day synthetics create the best lather/prep than any of them. They do for me and are not as pretty. So what. SOTD pictures really have little to do with the shave. There just Instagram shots.

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 09-02-2016, 02:22 AM
#13
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(08-31-2016, 12:41 PM)beamon Wrote: But, if  it were agreed that the best shaving brush in all the world, in all catagories, was a dreadful looking thing; all straggly, dull, misshapen, wrong color and whatever else you can imagine, WOULD YOU OWN IT? We, obviously, are highly interested in the appearance of our brushes and I wonder how deep that interest runs.

WOULD YOU OWN IT?

Probably not to be honest

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 09-02-2016, 03:44 AM
#14
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What's  best next month?

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 09-02-2016, 06:25 AM
#15
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I own anything if it worked well. Heck, I drive a Prius! For years I played golf as a low (4) handicap golfer with "old" clubs that everyone said I needed to upgrade.

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 09-02-2016, 06:28 AM
#16
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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LE pumpkin scented soaps

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 09-02-2016, 07:06 AM
#17
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I would. 
Form follows function.

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 09-02-2016, 08:13 AM
#18
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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(09-02-2016, 06:25 AM)jackgoldman123 Wrote: I own anything if it worked well. Heck, I drive a Prius! For years I played golf as a low (4) handicap golfer with "old" clubs that everyone said I needed to upgrade.

Big mistake. When I upgraded to "modern equipment," it probably took me 6 months to get my game back to the way it was. Modern golf technology is fantastic, but there is something said for if something works, don't change it.

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 09-02-2016, 08:44 AM
#19
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This question could be answered differently depending on the region of the person. E.G., in highly developed countries with advanced economies and mature industry, we'd be more likely to insist upon a heightened aesthetic baseline. I'd also offer that a shaving brush has relatively few variables actually affecting performance (hair grade, knot quality & size, loft, etc). As such, using tactics like eye-catching aesthetics to distract one from poor execution will succeed less often. That said, our current market features many brushes that demonstrate the fusion of great performance and visual appeal. If a truly stellar knot was offered in a pedestrian handle, many would simply purchase and transplant it because we are accustomed to a world filled with beautiful, functional things. 

There are some interesting parallels to this. When the complexity of technical execution is very high (specialized automobiles, audio equipment, medical equipment, space travel, etc), we are much more likely to focus on the end result vs. the visual appeal. However this can change over time and as the ability to reproduce those complex outcomes become commonplace (or devalued), aesthetics rise in importance. For example: mechanical watches are marvels of engineering, but most people today wear a watch simply as a form of jewelry (if at all).

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 09-02-2016, 11:50 AM
#20
  • beamon
  • Active Member
  • Greenville, SC USA
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(09-02-2016, 08:44 AM)mike_the_kraken Wrote: This question could be answered differently depending on the region of the person. E.G., in highly developed countries with advanced economies and mature industry, we'd be more likely to insist upon a heightened aesthetic baseline. I'd also offer that a shaving brush has relatively few variables actually affecting performance (hair grade, knot quality & size, loft, etc). As such, using tactics like eye-catching aesthetics to distract one from poor execution will succeed less often. That said, our current market features many brushes that demonstrate the fusion of great performance and visual appeal. If a truly stellar knot was offered in a pedestrian handle, many would simply purchase and transplant it because we are accustomed to a world filled with beautiful, functional things. 

There are some interesting parallels to this. When the complexity of technical execution is very high (specialized automobiles, audio equipment, medical equipment, space travel, etc), we are much more likely to focus on the end result vs. the visual appeal. However this can change over time and as the ability to reproduce those complex outcomes become commonplace (or devalued), aesthetics rise in importance. For example: mechanical watches are marvels of engineering, but most people today wear a watch simply as a form of jewelry (if at all).
Good post, Mike. Your differentiating by economically 'better off' countries and further, by complexity of the product itself is a valid technique for judging imo. Am I inferring correctly that, in your particular case, you would pass on the butt ugly, but super best by all othet reckoning brush?

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