10-08-2016, 07:49 AM
#1
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This morning j decided to make some bread. What a process holy crap. Without any electric mixer it was a lot of hand work. More than I would have imagined. 

What are some tips and tricks for the novice bread maker?

I just followed what was on the side of the flour package.

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 10-08-2016, 09:03 AM
#2
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Depending on the why you make bread and how often you plan on making it; an electric mixer makes life easier, a bread machine (while a somewhat costly single tasking machine) makes the process so easy it's almost like cheating.

There is a ton of recipes out in the wild; personally I'm partial to wholegrain bread in various forms. Sour-dough breads are tasty, but tricky to make.

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 10-08-2016, 09:16 AM
#3
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Unless you have a great deal of time and the desire to go down the rabbit hole, soda bread might be a good idea. Beer bread and such that are less intensive but very good tasting.

Supporting a local baker that does the tough part is a good way to get fresh bread.

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 10-08-2016, 09:22 AM
#4
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(10-08-2016, 07:49 AM)Stainless Wrote: This morning j decided to make some bread. What a process holy crap. Without any electric mixer it was a lot of hand work. More than I would have imagined. 

What are some tips and tricks for the novice bread maker?

I just followed what was on the side of the flour package.
Try no knead bread. Super easy for the novice and you don't need any special equipment, ingredients or tiresome manual labour.

Enviado de meu XT1225 usando Tapatalk

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 10-08-2016, 02:43 PM
#5
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Breaking Bad ?!?

Sorry, I'm dyslexic - just kidding  Tongue

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 10-08-2016, 03:40 PM
#6
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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 10-08-2016, 04:13 PM
#7
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Thanks for posting that link Richard. 

Scott

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 10-08-2016, 04:31 PM
#8
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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(10-08-2016, 04:13 PM)Stainless Wrote: Thanks for posting that link Richard. 

Scott

You're welcome. It's perhaps the easiest bread, and very tasty, that you could make.

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 10-08-2016, 05:08 PM
#9
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Have been tweaking this recipe to my needs and preferences. ATK is quite good if you like consistency and this recipe does not ask for a mixer https://www.cooksillustrated.com/recipes...ough-bread

They also have one based on commercial yeast that looks quite similar to the one Richard shared with you and I also like that one. I just prefer sourdough. 

A local (1-2 mile radius) baker is always a good option if you have one. Unfortunately I don't.

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 10-09-2016, 06:14 AM
#10
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The problem with the no-knead bread is that it's so easy that my mixer doesn't get much use anymore. The same laof can be made in a loaf pan. It'll come out not as crusty done in that shape and without a cover.

I second getting a stand mixer if you get deeply into any baking. I bought an Ankarsrum a few years ago and it's the best mixer I have ever used of any brand, period. Much better than KitchenAid even though KA has name recognition. Yes, I know ATK hates them, but I believe they tried to use it the same way a KA mixer is used. I did suggest to Chris Kimball that I could drive down to them to show them how to use one. So far I haven't heard back. The last time they tested stand mixers Ankarsrum was completely left out and he heard about that from me also. For some reason they love KA and the attachments are just junk too. It's almost impossible to make good sausage with the grinder as it doesn't so much chop meat as tears it apart and smears it. Oh well. When I saw ATK touting a machine and attachments I knew form experience to be garbage I started to view ATK ratings with skepticism.

BTW, I had a KA and after having it for a few months I had to send it back to get it fixed. After that I sold it as I wasn't going to have a few of them, one being repaired, one in use and a spare for when the 2nd one broke and the 1st one hadn't arrived back yet. My brother also went through 3 KAs until I turned him on to Ankarsrum. He likes the thing as much as I do and he's bought each of his sons one. They're not inexpensive, but they are lifetime machines. The attachments work great too and are every bit as usable as the base machine. Just don't use the mixer as though it's a KA.

BTW, my Ankarsrum makes bread from the grain berries right through to finished dough. I don't even knead the dough because the kneading action is so good. I have to chuckle when I see a cooking show and after dough comes out of the KA mixer the person finishes kneading it by hand. That's what the mixer is supposed to do; that's it's job.

I could go on and on about mixers as I studied them in depth before buying my Ank'.

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 10-09-2016, 09:41 AM
#11
  • MaxP
  • Senior Member
  • Madison, WI
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The modern KitchenAid mixers are pretty much junk.  Its unfortunate that a once great name is now sullied with very poor quality.



I have a Kitchen Aid stand mixer that I bought from a school closing auction 20 years ago.  It had seen a fair amount of use then.  And I've used it steadily since.  And its built like a tank.  I was in an antique shop a couple weeks ago and saw an old KA with all the attachments for $75.  I should've bought it.

[Image: XcweGy7.jpg]




Save

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 10-09-2016, 11:01 AM
#12
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I like ATK processes more than their product reviews. Sometimes I wonder if they've crossed the infomercial line.

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 10-09-2016, 03:10 PM
#13
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Yes Max, they're just junk now. They derive from the Hobart R50 (from memory, so I might be remembering incorrectly about specifics) and that was a butt ugly, but excellent mixer. They're still made today but one is over $3k. It'll still only mix a relatively small quantity of dough, same as todays KA. Todays KAs have plastic gears designed to fail. Back a few decades they were made better. If you ever need service you'll figure out what the KA industry is. They have returns and repairs very convenient for the owner. It's a huge money maker for them. To the point where they have form fitted foam boxes that they ship to the user to ship it back to them for repair. They've repaired a few million mixers to have it down to that degree. After mine broke and I saw the industry that they had in place for repairs, that's when the light went off for me. Then I talked to my brother and heard of his experiences (3x) and I knew I had to look at another brand. I discussed it on forums and one gent said that he keeps gears on hand and has gear changes down to 20 minutes. I just want to make bread, not do a fast gear change in the middle of a rise.

If someone can find a really old one that would be the one to have. But a newly made KA mixer is designed to sit there and impress from mere ownership and not heavy use. It's OK for cakes and light duty, but for making the families bread, it just won't hold up in the long term unless it's a very hydrated dough. Even then it'll need to be hand kneaded after the mixer is done kneading it. KA is resting on their reputation from the past and they deserve none of that today.

The only other mixer I found that might have worked for me was the Bosch, but it had a few of the same flaws as the KA as far as needing a shield so as not to make a mess and such. It also doesn't have the capacity of the Ankarsrum. I can make 13# of dough in it, but the most I've made so far is 4 big loaves, something like 16 cups of flour (it'll handle 22) . It'll also make pasta dough without destroying itself. I've made a huge batch of that. I can put my hand right in the mixer as it's running and working and it's as though my hand isn't even there. It's as safe a mixer as can ever be designed, and it's wide open for adding ingredients.

Sorry, but I love the design. Yeah, I know I can go on and on about it. It's just so superior though, and I've had others. I can make yeast rolls for dinner in no time at all, because while I'm doing other things the Ank' is doing its thing and after it's kneaded and ready for me to form them it shuts itself off. Gotta love a machine that does that. But everything about the machine has that level of detail and useabilty. I go on about few things, but when something is so well designed I just gush. As I get older I find more and more of the really good things that are worth having and I buy less and less garbage.  Wish I had discovered that many years ago. I'd have saved a huge amount of cash over the years. But it right, buy it once, and have it forever.

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 10-19-2016, 09:52 AM
#14
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It's too warm during the summer to bake bread but it was OK today. I missed fresh bread and today I made 3 loaves of the No-Knead bread in loaf form. 2 will go into the freezer.


[Image: DSC04392_zps1eapsrzt.jpg]

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 10-27-2016, 06:47 AM
#15
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Making more bread today for a "submarine sandwich" that we make, except ours no longer looks like a submarine. I made one batch of the no-knead bread and split that into 2 loaves, each in it's own loaf pan. What will be produced are loaves that won't be very high and with lots of crust. We'll split each one into 2 slabs to build our sandwiches.

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 10-27-2016, 07:46 AM
#16
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I've been baking bread for some years. It's a great hobby. The kids just love all the different things that get made. My wife and I try not to eat too much of it but it's hard to resist a great rye or grain bread or sourdough.

We have 2 bread machines that we use to mix up the dough but we then hand form the loaves and bake them. We have a steam oven which works great or just the normal oven. About 3-4 hours of intermittent steps and usually something great can be created with minimal handling.

At various times I have bits and pieces of fermenting old dough in the fridge as well as sourdough mixes, poolish etc. More recently I just make some loaves in form tins for the kid's lunches. Rye bread with Carraway seeds is probably our favourite.

Great books I have and use are:
Bread Machine Book - Beth Hensperger
(For the recipes. We never bake in the machine)
(Great theory, tips, easy recipes)

Rustic European Breads from your Bread Machine - Diana C. Butts, Linda W. Eckhardt

If you're really hooked:
The Bread Baker's Apprentice - Peter Reinhart


Some examples:
[Image: 7698cb567e4a7870acc86aab144fe22f.jpg]
[Image: f3546939893645e90450178f4b185eb8.jpg]
[Image: 7f18c9b8e623ccccc0cdb8018a081cbe.jpg]
[Image: ce1f8280a7fdcd21a1165efe7840b162.jpg]
[Image: 63a8606b7ab99e545c5be8a6cd001dca.jpg]
[Image: f1f6459424b23b2854d6f51adeecd02f.jpg]
[Image: 06136b1b0a7442b875695088222bd1a0.jpg]
[Image: dee42787d01233fbd45bd8d7fed2459e.jpg]

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 10-27-2016, 11:20 AM
#17
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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Wow, some great looking bread. My mouth is watering. I know what I'll be doing this weekend!

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 10-27-2016, 11:45 AM
#18
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Nice looking bread! Do you ever make sourdough rye (aka NY rye aka Jewish rye) ? I'd like to find a good recipe for it that uses fresh ground berries. I do have recipes that use commercial rye flour. Rye is so different from a wheat dough and fresh ground rye appears different yet again with all of the problems of the bran and enzymes that destroy what little gluten structure that there is. But maybe that's why the Germans make their dense (mostly whole berry) Brot.

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 10-27-2016, 10:56 PM
#19
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(10-27-2016, 11:45 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Nice looking bread! Do you ever make sourdough rye (aka NY rye aka Jewish rye) ? I'd like to find a good recipe for it that uses fresh ground berries. I do have recipes that use commercial rye flour. Rye is so different from a wheat dough and fresh ground rye appears different yet again with all of the problems of the bran and enzymes that destroy what little gluten structure that there is. But maybe that's why the Germans make their dense (mostly whole berry) Brot.


Have made a couple of breads a bit like that but not with all the sprouting of the berries. I can forward you some recipes photographed out of my books. I tend to make rye breads that also have other flours mixed in but recently I have been trying some recipes with stone ground rye, cracked berries, and pumpernickel meal. They are a lot heavier but very tasty. Will need to look into the fresh berries methods too!

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 12-17-2016, 10:18 PM
#20
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This is a very easy and tasty bread recipe.

http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/11376-no-knead-bread

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