12-18-2016, 01:28 AM
#21
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I haven't been baking quite as often as I like lately. I have a vintage 1970's Kitchen-Aid that my grandmother gave me, she prefers to knead bread by hand. I love the thing, I would say it's been my favorite kitchen appliance since moving into my own place years ago.

Honey Oat Bread
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Challah Bread (need to work on my braiding)
[Image: vmzXPMX.jpg]

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 12-18-2016, 01:30 PM
#22
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It certainly is Asiliski. I've made it a number of times.

Trumble, I bet your tastebuds and stomach didn't notice the braiding. Fresh bread and butter would be on my list of last meals if it ever came down to that. I can almost taste those loaves and I'm salivating.

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 12-18-2016, 03:42 PM
#23
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(12-18-2016, 01:30 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: It certainly is Asiliski. I've made it a number of times.

Trumble, I bet your tastebuds and stomach didn't notice the braiding. Fresh bread and butter would be on my list of last meals if it ever came down to that. I can almost taste those loaves and I'm salivating.

Biggrin Yeah come to think of it the braiding didn't make it taste awful. I agree on the Fresh bread and butter, My grandmother makes homemade butter (they have a small dairy farm) between that butter and my Mom's Italian bread recipe I think it would make a fine last meal.

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 12-18-2016, 09:59 PM
#24
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Care to share her recipe? She's not one of those folks who withholds critical info is she? :-) I'm looking for an Italian bread that the wife can handle. I make great bread for our sub sandwiches (and last nights muffelatta) that I enjoy, but she has problems. I think that the supermarkets Italian bread is horrible, but that's what I'm left with for the wife.

The last bread I made, for the muffaletta, was the ATK pizza dough recipe. Just outstanding flavor with the slow 10 day rise (not suggested by ATK) and a great crust, but the wife wouldn't even attempt it.

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 12-18-2016, 10:13 PM
#25
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(12-18-2016, 09:59 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Care to share her recipe? She's not one of those folks who withholds critical info is she? :-) I'm looking for an Italian bread that the wife can handle. I make great bread for our sub sandwiches (and last nights muffelatta) that I enjoy, but she has problems. I think that the supermarkets Italian bread is horrible, but that's what I'm left with for the wife.

The last bread I made, for the muffaletta, was the ATK pizza dough recipe. Just outstanding flavor with the slow 10 day rise (not suggested by ATK) and a great crust, but the wife wouldn't even attempt it.

Yeah for sure, I think it's on an index card in one of my cookbooks, I'm at work until 0600 but I'll post it when I get home. 

I find most of the supermarket Italian bread to be too much like French bread, crunchy on the outside and like an air pocket inside with no flavor... I prefer a bread with some body. My grandmother (the original passer-downer of the recipe) uses High Gluten bread flour, I'm not that particular about it and think AP flour works just as well.

That Muffaletta looks interesting, from the pictures I'm seeing online it looks as though an Italian bread, and a Soda bread had a baby. Seems to be "The Bread" if you want a Italian meats, Olive relish sandwich.

P.S.: It just hit me what ATK stood for, I love America's Test Kitchen, I tried their Pizza dough recipe and it came out alright, I think I did something wrong though.... Every single thing I've baked out of their cookbook has come out phenomenal, so I'm going to attribute that to baker error. I use their Muffin recipe that has yogurt in it and just throw in fresh blueberries and no other fruit/zest ingredients, and people here at work go nuts for them. Their oatmeal raisin cookies are also much better if you sub Choc. Chips for raisins (I hate raisins though).

ATK is where I got that Challah bread recipe from.

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 12-19-2016, 04:25 AM
#26
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Italian bread


2 cups luke warm water

1 tsp salt

1 tbsp yeast or 1 packet

5-6 cups AP/Bread flour



Soften yeast in water in large bowl



Add 2 cups flour and salt, mix well



Add rest of flour, mix well



*Turn out onto floured board knead 5-8 mins



* or use mixer with bread hook



Place in oiled bowl, let rise til doubled (45-60mins)



Punch down and let sit 10 mins



Shape into loaves, put in oiled pans Let rise 45-60 mins



Bake 425° for 10 mins



Turn oven to 350° bake til nicely brown (30 mins)



*Sounds hollow when tapped. 



*Grease top with butter or margarine while baking to soften or don't for crusty top.

-it's a pretty basic recipe but it comes out awesome every time, it makes excellent toast too.

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 12-19-2016, 06:55 AM
#27
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Thanks!

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 12-19-2016, 10:27 AM
#28
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(12-19-2016, 06:55 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Thanks!

You're welcome!

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 12-20-2016, 06:31 PM
#29
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I've been baking bread since my teens.  Nothing fancy though I'd like to get into some artisanal breads some time - but I just love hot home-made white bread and the smell it generates throughout the house.

My favorite recipe is my first - from the Fanny Farmer cookbook.

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 12-23-2016, 07:25 AM
#30
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Niemander, The easiest "artisanal" bread to make is the no-knead loaf that was linked to in post #20. OK, maybe not artisinal, but only you will know the difference. It takes 5 minutes to assemble and the dough does the rest while you sleep, or at least that's how I make it.

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