10-26-2016, 06:59 PM
#21
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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(10-26-2016, 08:35 AM)FreddieP318ti Wrote: Nerve damage in my hand makes it harder to hold them. Got rid of mine for safety reasons.  Undecided


This is something I fear with time. I have some nerve damage, as well as carpel tunnel and the onset of arthritis. I get very minor tremors in my hands at times.
So far it has not been enough to cause too much of an issue from straight shaving. I have a few times had to resort to a DE for a few days until things settled down, but have not needed to do that in several months. I hope that it will be a long time yet before I have to make a permanent choice.
Freddie, sorry for your loss. I hope you continue to enjoy wetshaving with your DEs. They are wonderful razors, too.

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 10-26-2016, 10:48 PM
#22
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I never really started. Gave it a try a few times, scraped the hell out of my face, maintenance was a hassle. Safety razors are dead simple and "maintenance" is replacing a blade once in a while, and I can do it half-asleep.

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 10-27-2016, 12:18 AM
#23
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I started right at two years with a Gold Dollar and cheapie strop, well long story short I gave the GD away and have been trying to refine my collection to the harder to find one's that are in pristine condition, i have also put a cap of 20 as my max and have brought alot of them in and sent alot out getting better and better shavers. When I first started I honestly was not sure I wanted to pursue straights but in all honsety I am glad I kept after it, stropping is very easy and will maintain an edge for many, many months if done correctly then one can use a pasted balsa strop to refresh then a stone touchup is needed and a inexpensive finisher can get you back on track fairly easy.

As far as time goes, yes it does take time to do a nice three pass but after you get the say first 100 shaves in it should get easier and easier, i can do a pretty decent 2-3 passes in about 15 mins and that counts me working up my lather, for those sitting on the fence with straights I would say pick up one from BST or another source, don't spend alot to begin with as any razor if honed properly will yield a decent shave and for those that don't want to get into honing I will hone your razor for free just cover round trip shipping, a strop can be had for a pretty fair price from a variety of sources so for about $75 I am pretty sure you can get a good starting setup.

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 10-27-2016, 12:34 AM
#24
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I have tried to use a Thiers Issard on and off, which I rceived as a present last year, but it really takes patience and calm hands to use this beauty.

But the honing thing kills it for me, I prefer to be able to control such things myself and not having to ship it all over the world.

I might revisit straight razors again in 2017, but then I'm going all in, buying my own sets of stones from Japan and honing them completely at my home from start to finish.

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 10-27-2016, 12:58 AM
#25
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(10-27-2016, 12:34 AM)CHSeifert Wrote: I have tried to use a Thiers Issard on and off, which I rceived as a present last year, but it really takes patience and calm hands to use this beauty.

But the honing thing kills it for me, I prefer to be able to control such things myself and not having to ship it all over the world.

I might revisit straight razors again in 2017, but then I'm going all in, buying my own sets of stones from Japan and honing them completely at my home from start to finish.
That is honestly the best way to go about it. Buy your stones and hone it until your edge is where you want it. Then you don't have to ship it out and you gain a nice sense of accomplishment. Besides knowing at any time you can pick up a straight razor and shave with it/ hone it is a good feeling.

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 10-27-2016, 04:53 AM
#26
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My journey with SR began in July and I have just reached the point where I have about 120 SR shaves.  I am hooked on the process and will continue with SR as for me some of the reasons to give up on straights are the very reason I enjoy them.

Time Consuming: Absolutely more time consuming than DE's but I enjoy the overall experience of SR shaving and with the additional focus required in every step of the process I feel more engaged in the shave.

Learning Curve: 100 shaves to get comfortable with a SR is pretty accurate, as well as stropping which I didn't expect to be a difficult process to learn but required a great deal of practice.  But for me there is a reward in learning a new skill.  

Better results with other methods:  I can get a great BBS with a SE or a DE, but the SR gives me a more fulfilling shave experience.  For me the totality of the experience is more important than marginal result differences.  But hey thats just me.

Honing is where I find myself struggling a bit, but as mentioned sending the SR all over the globe to get them honed would be a definite pain in the rear end.  So I am approaching honing as the other skills necessary for SR shave and patiently trying to get the hang of it.  And its frustrating to learn.  But it is going to be a great feeling when I acquire the skill after many failed attempts : )

Being in control and responsible for putting the edge on the blade, stropping and keeping it maintained, and ultimately putting an edge on my face that I created are not a negative for me.  It is the very reason I enjoy SR.

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 10-28-2016, 04:06 AM
#27
  • BobH
  • Senior Member
  • Thunder Bay Canada
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(10-27-2016, 04:53 AM)Newton Wrote: My journey with SR began in July and I have just reached the point where I have about 120 SR shaves.  I am hooked on the process and will continue with SR as for me some of the reasons to give up on straights are the very reason I enjoy them.

Time Consuming: Absolutely more time consuming than DE's but I enjoy the overall experience of SR shaving and with the additional focus required in every step of the process I feel more engaged in the shave.

Learning Curve: 100 shaves to get comfortable with a SR is pretty accurate, as well as stropping which I didn't expect to be a difficult process to learn but required a great deal of practice.  But for me there is a reward in learning a new skill.  

Better results with other methods:  I can get a great BBS with a SE or a DE, but the SR gives me a more fulfilling shave experience.  For me the totality of the experience is more important than marginal result differences.  But hey thats just me.

Honing is where I find myself struggling a bit, but as mentioned sending the SR all over the globe to get them honed would be a definite pain in the rear end.  So I am approaching honing as the other skills necessary for SR shave and patiently trying to get the hang of it.  And its frustrating to learn.  But it is going to be a great feeling when I acquire the skill after many failed attempts : )

Being in control and responsible for putting the edge on the blade, stropping and keeping it maintained, and ultimately putting an edge on my face that I created are not a negative for me.  It is the very reason I enjoy SR.

+1

Bob

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 10-28-2016, 09:31 AM
#28
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I just got into straights this summer.  It is definitely one expensive endeavor.  It is a small niche in the wet shaving community.  There is something great about having the ultimate control from how sharp the edge is to having pure steel cutting your whiskers.  It is more of a ritual since many steps are involved. I must say it is a very expensive way of shaving but the rewards are great. 

I love the process and wouldn't give it up.  I wish I started sooner than later.

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 10-28-2016, 05:58 PM
#29
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I just haven't been able to achieve the comfortable familiarity with a straight that I naturally fell into with a DE. It's like snowboarding vs. skiing: I can do both, but boarding is just more natural for me.

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 10-30-2016, 06:39 PM
#30
  • matloffm
  • Senior Member
  • Culver City, CA
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I use a Feather AC.  I get good, comfortable shaves with it.  I have 5 regular straights that I don't use because they are not sharp enough.  I have had them honed by the best out there and they just don't cut my beard.  I pretty much have to shave with Feather blades (AC or DE) to get a smooth cut.  My prep takes a while too, 2 face washings with Castile soap and 2 minutes with a warm wet towel on my face, but my beard is still like copper wire.  Straights are just not sharp enough for my beard.

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 10-30-2016, 09:15 PM
#31
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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Straight razor shaving is alive and well. One just has to visit SRP. Prices of vintage razors have sky rocketed and are often difficult to find, and there is often a year's wait for a custom razor. After using a straight almost exclusively for the past three years, I can easily shave as quickly as with a DE or SE if needed, although that would take the fun out of it. I would probably use my Cobra or Asylum Rx if I was in a big hurry. I can now get a closer shave with a straight, and with less irritation, than with a DE or SE, although the learning curve was steep to get to this point. I get more into a "zen moment" with a straight than a SE, probably because it requires so much more concentration. I find honing relaxing and enjoyable, as well as stropping. It's just as easy to get hooked on hones and strops, as well as straights, as others get hooked on soaps and brushes, or the latest DE/SE. There is a strong community of straight razor shavers. Most are more than willing to share their knowledge and time to help someone out. I spent several hours with a fine gentleman on more than one occasion who was gracious enough to teach me how to hone. I now consider him a good friend. I know that it's not for everyone, but my only regret is that I didn't take it up when I was starting out wet shaving 53 years ago.

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 10-30-2016, 09:22 PM
#32
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Mine is definitely being:

1) Complicated - Linked to point 2

2) Honing and Stroping

3) Cost

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 10-30-2016, 09:24 PM
#33
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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(10-28-2016, 05:58 PM)mike_the_kraken Wrote: I just haven't been able to achieve the comfortable familiarity with a straight that I naturally fell into with a DE. It's like snowboarding vs. skiing: I can do both, but boarding is just more natural for me.

You must have grown up on a skateboard. I started skiing in the early 50's on wooden skis with leather straps for bindings. Snowboarding to me would be like riding side saddle on a horse. Nothing seems natural going down the mountain sideways. However, my daughter is a snowboarder and can go places on the mountain I would never dream of skiing. I'm hoping for plenty snow this winter.

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 05-03-2017, 04:36 AM
#34
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I seem to do okay on the face, but man do I screw up the neck. I've watched some great videos it just seems I cannot get the angle right. I either scrap, shave a little then cut a little. Does your face have to get used to it?

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 05-03-2017, 05:31 AM
#35
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
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For me it's quite straightforward: the thought of shaving with an SR (aka, a cut throat) terrifies me. Blush

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 05-03-2017, 07:14 AM
#36
  • Snuff
  • Senior Member
  • Belgium
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I used to shave with straights, then I started getting hand cramps when holding small objects, not something you want when holding a very sharp knife against your face and throat. So I had to use DE's and even those where attached to a small cord so that if I let them fall they wouldn't be damaged. I thought it was because of the 4 disks in my lower back and the 4 in my neck that where screwed together (parachute accident) but last year I got lucky.

A female friend who is also into Ashtanga yoga had a Indian Ayurveda doctor visiting here and he examined me and without pre knowledge told me what kind of troubles I was experiencing in my body. Long story short, no more medicines, no more cramps, lost 45 pounds and I'm back into Ashtanga.

I'm having the time of my life shaving twice a day again with my toys  Cool

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 05-03-2017, 08:30 AM
#37
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(10-26-2016, 11:20 AM)SoSharpDavid Wrote: I would encourage people to keep at it. Ive been straight razor shaving for about 5 years. 2 years in to it I taught my 13 year old son how to shave with a straight. 3 years in and its the only way to shave that he knows. He tried a DE and does not like it. There is just a very unique sense of accomplishment when you use a straight razor. A little dedication, patience, and consistency will get you there.


Well, you're an artist with that SR.

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 05-03-2017, 09:25 AM
#38
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(05-03-2017, 07:14 AM)Snuff Wrote: I used to shave with straights, then I started getting hand cramps when holding small objects, not something you want when holding a very sharp knife against your face and throat. So I had to use DE's and even those where attached to a small cord so that if I let them fall they wouldn't be damaged. I thought it was because of the 4 disks in my lower back and the 4 in my neck that where screwed together (parachute accident) but last year I got lucky.

A female friend who is also into Ashtanga yoga had a Indian Ayurveda doctor visiting here and he examined me and without pre knowledge told me what kind of troubles I was experiencing in my body. Long story short, no more medicines, no more cramps, lost 45 pounds and I'm back into Ashtanga.

I'm having the time of my life shaving twice a day again with my toys  Cool

That's a very interesting story. I would like to hear more about.

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 05-03-2017, 09:29 AM
#39
  • doc47
  • Senior Member
  • Northern Arizona
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This is an interesting thread, thanks for starting it. I'm an old retired guy with lots of time on his hands, so about16-17 months ago I decided to teach myself to shave with a SR. I dabbled with with a SR in college but that attempt went no where. It took me several months to feel mildly confident in my ability and then one day I bought a MK*31 on a friend's recommendation and my abilities took a big leap. Like others have mentioned, at my age I have arthritis in both hands and they tend to shake at times making holding a SR a bit difficult. That's where the MK*31 comes in; it is a small and light razor and fit my hand like a dream. The feedback I got from the hollow ground blade was what I needed to improve my confidence. By 6 months I was getting regular BBS shaves. Then I decided to help others learn to use a SR and on another site I shared and gave away straight razors to help guys get started. Over a 7 month period 38 guys learned to use a SR. Some have stayed with it, others have gone back to DEs and SEs. So, because most of those guys were using DE razors I decided to give DEs a try. I fell in love with Aristocrats and now own 10 Gillettes of various types. At the present time I primarily shave with SRs, but alternate with DEs on a regular basis. Both give me shaves of amazing quality (BBS) and I shave about as quickly with either type razor. The issue of honing, to me, is a big empty Trojan horse. All of my SR razors were sent out to be honed, meaning a proper bevel and edge were set. In 17 months I've never re-honed a single SR of mine. I maintain them with my strop. I have learned to stop quickly so my daily time commitment to razor maintenance is about 2 minutes. So every day I shave I make sure to take lots of time and enjoy the shave regardless of the razor I have chosen that day. If any of you non-SR users want to give it a try, I still have razors to loan and give away! Happy shaving friends.

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 05-03-2017, 11:19 AM
#40
  • Snuff
  • Senior Member
  • Belgium
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Dan that is a fantastic offer! Your a great guy!

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