11-01-2016, 04:15 AM
#1
  • Teddyboy
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  • NYC
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At the risk of exposing myself as being lazy, can someone tell me what are Plisson-style synthetics.  Are they commonly considered the best synthetics?  Where does one find them?  Approx cost?


Thanks in advance for your feedback.

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 11-01-2016, 06:23 AM
#2
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Plisson is/was the name of a synthetic that was made by L'Occitane. A lot of other companies now make very similar products and so they say plisson style.

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 11-01-2016, 09:22 AM
#3
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Plisson makes synthetic brushes using a particular fiber.  A number of manufacturers were able to source the same, or substantially identical, fiber for their own brushes.   RazoRock, Stirling, and Maggard all make inexpensive synthetic brushes with Plisson style fibers.  Whether these are the "best" synthetics is a matter of personal preference. However, many think these brushes offer great performance, and they are available at a low price.

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 11-01-2016, 10:24 AM
#4
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Ditto to what the others have said. But there area other "types" of synthetics, for example the ubersoft 2. One is not "better" than the other, but they feel different, so it is personal preference. My advice? Try a few synthetics to see if you like one better.

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 11-01-2016, 11:58 AM
#5
  • Teddyboy
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  • NYC
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I'm afraid to start given my AD problems, but I will likely venture into the synthetic realm.  Thanks for the guidance.

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 11-01-2016, 12:34 PM
#6
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(11-01-2016, 11:58 AM)Teddyboy Wrote: I'm afraid to start given my AD problems, but I will likely venture into the synthetic realm.  Thanks for the guidance.

Ted, it will probably be an interesting experiment, but you won't last very long there from what I can tell of your love of badger brushes. Shy

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 11-01-2016, 03:13 PM
#7
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Ted I have a couple And i would be willing to send one to you if you would like.

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 11-01-2016, 06:44 PM
#8
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(11-01-2016, 03:13 PM)chromedometone Wrote: Ted I have a couple And i would be willing to send one to you if you would like.

A wonderful gesture! Thumbsup

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 11-02-2016, 01:55 PM
#9
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(11-01-2016, 06:44 PM)celestino Wrote:
(11-01-2016, 03:13 PM)chromedometone Wrote: Ted I have a couple And i would be willing to send one to you if you would like.

A wonderful gesture! Thumbsup

Indeed it is.

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 11-07-2016, 03:20 PM
#10
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(11-01-2016, 04:15 AM)Teddyboy Wrote: At the risk of exposing myself as being lazy, can someone tell me what are Plisson-style synthetics.  Are they commonly considered the best synthetics?  Where does one find them?  Approx cost?


Thanks in advance for your feedback.

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 11-07-2016, 06:29 PM
#11
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(11-01-2016, 04:15 AM)Teddyboy Wrote: At the risk of exposing myself as being lazy, can someone tell me what are Plisson-style synthetics.  Are they commonly considered the best synthetics?  Where does one find them?  Approx cost?


Thanks in advance for your feedback.

Plisson sourced a new synthetic type fibre, that were great and softer and less springy than most synthetic brushes you could get 2-3 years ago.
Problem with it, was it was only made in 22 mm knot and the loft was high, so it felt floppy to some.

Then a few vendors in the US sourced what feels and looks to be the same hair type as the Plisson fibre, had them made in more densely packed knots, some in larger size knots too and in different lofts, usually shorter lofts to make the face feel more solid.

These new types of clone knots were therefore called Plisson-style knots.

They are priced 3-4 times lower, than a Plisson synthetic cost.

Brands that make the Plissson style knots among others are RazoRock, Stirling Soap Company and Wolf Whiskers.

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 11-15-2016, 07:52 PM
#12
  • Teddyboy
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  • NYC
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(11-01-2016, 12:34 PM)celestino Wrote:
(11-01-2016, 11:58 AM)Teddyboy Wrote: I'm afraid to start given my AD problems, but I will likely venture into the synthetic realm.  Thanks for the guidance.

Ted, it will probably be an interesting experiment, but you won't last very long there from what I can tell of your love of badger brushes. Shy

Você tem uma excelente memória; você está correto também. 

P.S.  I hope this makes sense Celestino.

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 11-18-2016, 02:54 AM
#13
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(11-01-2016, 06:23 AM)Spudnut Wrote: Plisson is/was the name of a synthetic that was made by L'Occitane. A lot of other companies now make very similar products and so they say plisson style.

Close, but not quite.  L'Occitane sold, but did not make, a brush that was made by Plisson.

Plisson Badgers (Blaireaux Plisson in the original French) has been around for more than two centuries, since 1808.  Plisson has made very high-end, excellent, badger hair brushes for years and years and years.   Still does. 

L'Occitane en Provence was founded (originally as an extractor of fragrance oils from flowers that grow in the south of France) in 1976; by that time, Plisson already had been in business for 164 years.

Until 2013 or 2014, shaving brushes with synthetic fibers were the bottom rung of shaving brushes, both in performance and prestige.  Mühle of Germany was not the first, but, from a prestige standpoint, was the notable pioneer, to bring out a socially acceptable (to snobs like us) synthetic brush, with newly developed fibers that mimicked (and in some ways improved upon) the behavior of badger hair and were dyed to mimic badger hair also, and that broke the dam.  

L'Occitane en Provence, by then an international marketing company, contracted with Plisson to make a branded brush for L'Occitane that incorporated a different kind of fibers than Mühle used; Plisson’s fibers are similar to the fibers used in ladies’ make-up brushes for applying and smoothing powder on the complexion.   L'Occitaine sold the new Plisson-branded brushes in its thousands of stores worldwide.  The offering was an instant commercial success, and the rest, as they say, is history.

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 11-18-2016, 05:15 AM
#14
  • beamon
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  • Greenville, SC USA
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Unteresting history, Mel. Thanks for posting it.

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 11-18-2016, 07:34 AM
#15
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I have been wetshaving for over 3 years now I believe that the Plisson style synth is the closest thing to a "game changer" in this hobby.

My rationale: wetshaving requires mastering several skills at once, but the most important skill in the beginning is making good lather.

This style brush simply makes it much much easier to make good lather, especially for novices.   I'd say its similar to when Prince came out with the oversized tennis racket compared to the small wooden or metal ones.  All of a sudden, older and less athletic people could hit the ball well enough to play.

For newbs starting out today, getting a Plisson style brush means they can concentrate on learning other skills other than lather making.

The fact that they are now $12 is even more amazing.  I guess another analogy would be the cheap Casio quartz watch that actually tells time better than a $10K Rolex.

This is not to say I don't love the feel of a high end badger brush -- I have several and love them.  I do however reach for one of my synths when I need to make lather in a hurry.

Just my 2 cents.

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 11-18-2016, 07:55 AM
#16
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Just to toss this question out there. I going to buy a few knots and was looking at a "Game Changer" and a"Tuxedo". Anyone here use both of these and able to tell the differences pro and cons.

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 11-18-2016, 11:29 AM
#17
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(11-18-2016, 07:34 AM)surfshaver Wrote: I have been wetshaving for over 3 years now I believe that the Plisson style synth is the closest thing to a "game changer" in this hobby.

My rationale: wetshaving requires mastering several skills at once, but the most important skill in the beginning is making good lather.

Yr obdnt srvnt is a contrarian on the second half of the quoted sentence.

I know of several commercial products that create no lather, yet moisten and the beard and lubricate the action of the blade admirably for an excellent “wet” shave.  (Examples:  Aubrey Men's Stock brushless shave cream; Kiss My Face 4-in-1 Lavender & Shea shave cream when applied with the fingertips instead of with a brush.)  

For a quarter of a century, I shaved virtually exclusively with Col. Ichabod Conk Amber shaving soap, which is commonly deprecated and sneered at on this board (and other shaving fora), presumably because the slick, protective lather it generates does not “look” good.  Somebody should start a thread — maybe I should do it, but I currently do not have any Col. Conk on hand — that challenges members of the Nook to post Shave of the Day (SOTD) shots where the only soap involved is Col. Conk Amber.  Be that as it may, generating “bad looking” but well-performing lather with Col. Conk is a cinch (on topic:   with a Plisson brush, as well as with others), and with that lather, one can move on to perfecting other aspects of shaving technique.

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 11-18-2016, 01:58 PM
#18
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(11-18-2016, 11:29 AM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(11-18-2016, 07:34 AM)surfshaver Wrote: I have been wetshaving for over 3 years now I believe that the Plisson style synth is the closest thing to a "game changer" in this hobby.

My rationale: wetshaving requires mastering several skills at once, but the most important skill in the beginning is making good lather.

Yr obdnt srvnt is a contrarian on the second half of the quoted sentence.

I know of several commercial products that create no lather, yet moisten and the beard and lubricate the action of the blade admirably for an excellent “wet” shave.  (Examples:  Aubrey Men's Stock brushless shave cream; Kiss My Face 4-in-1 Lavender & Shea shave cream when applied with the fingertips instead of with a brush.)  

For a quarter of a century, I shaved virtually exclusively with Col. Ichabod Conk Amber shaving soap, which is commonly deprecated and sneered at on this board (and other shaving fora), presumably because the slick, protective lather it generates does not “look” good.  Somebody should start a thread — maybe I should do it, but I currently do not have any Col. Conk on hand — that challenges members of the Nook to post Shave of the Day (SOTD) shots where the only soap involved is Col. Conk Amber.  Be that as it may, generating “bad looking” but well-performing lather with Col. Conk is a cinch (on topic:   with a Plisson brush, as well as with others), and with that lather, one can move on to perfecting other aspects of shaving technique.
Mel, I wholeheartedly agree with your observation.  There are several high-quality products that are used without a brush or don't require using a brush to produce a good shave.  As you said, KMF is one of them.  I also like Kiehl's and Malin + Goetz.  I was thinking about traditional soaps and creams that need a brush to be lathered.  For those starting out who choose to use one of these, I think the Plisson style brushes do make it easier.  

The other part of your point, as I take it, is that shaving soaps can produce close, comfortable shaves without producing "hero lather."  I'd agree on this as well.  I started off in this hobby with a tube of Proraso Red and for a few months my lather was thinner and more watery than what it's supposed to look like.  But it shaved just fine.

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