11-26-2016, 08:51 AM
#21
User Info
(11-26-2016, 06:52 AM)minimalist Wrote: You received a dandy for a first straight! Covered tang is ultra cool. Don't ever sell it!
I don't think I will, it's my first haha

0 52
Reply
 11-26-2016, 08:52 AM
#22
User Info
I fear I have already messed up the edge already with my poor stropping technique. Hard to tell though, since I don't know what I'm doing yet haha

0 52
Reply
 11-26-2016, 09:53 AM
#23
User Info
(11-26-2016, 08:52 AM)whiteboy_cannon Wrote: I fear I have already messed up the edge already with my poor stropping technique. Hard to tell though, since I don't know what I'm doing yet haha

If you wrecked the edge send it my way and i will hone it for free just cover round trip shipping.

6 1,161
Reply
 12-03-2016, 06:05 AM
#24
User Info
(11-26-2016, 08:52 AM)whiteboy_cannon Wrote: I fear I have already messed up the edge already with my poor stropping technique. Hard to tell though, since I don't know what I'm doing yet haha

Stropping was the one area that I didn't give enough thought to when I began and proved to be one of the more difficult tasks for me to learn how to do correctly.  I ended up ordering a modular paddle strop from SRD to learn on with less variables, and progressed back to the hanging strop after I had a better idea of what I was doing.

After about six months of SR shaving the one thing that I have learned (painfully) is anytime the razor is in my hand it has the potential to cut me.  Oddly, my mistakes that have drawn significant amounts of blood have never occurred when I am moving the razor across my face.  The major damage I have done to myself are always at those moments I don't expect the razor to cut me, the worst of which is when I placed the razor on my face at a wrong angle. The most frequent is when I am cleaning the razor and not paying enough attention to where the blade is in my hand.  I have actually cut my fingers and hands more than my face.

Bottom line advice.  If your not 110% focused, don't pick the razor up : )

6 221
Reply
 12-03-2016, 06:23 AM
#25
User Info
(12-03-2016, 06:05 AM)Newton Wrote:
(11-26-2016, 08:52 AM)whiteboy_cannon Wrote: I fear I have already messed up the edge already with my poor stropping technique. Hard to tell though, since I don't know what I'm doing yet haha

Stropping was the one area that I didn't give enough thought to when I began and proved to be one of the more difficult tasks for me to learn how to do correctly.  I ended up ordering a modular paddle strop from SRD to learn on with less variables, and progressed back to the hanging strop after I had a better idea of what I was doing.

After about six months of SR shaving the one thing that I have learned (painfully) is anytime the razor is in my hand it has the potential to cut me.  Oddly, my mistakes that have drawn significant amounts of blood have never occurred when I am moving the razor across my face.  The major damage I have done to myself are always at those moments I don't expect the razor to cut me, the worst of which is when I placed the razor on my face at a wrong angle. The most frequent is when I am cleaning the razor and not paying enough attention to where the blade is in my hand.  I have actually cut my fingers and hands more than my face.

Bottom line advice.  If your not 110% focused, don't pick the razor up : )
Haven't had any mistakes like that yet. Hope I don't. Thanks for the advice

0 52
Reply
 01-30-2017, 10:12 AM
#26
  • doc47
  • Active Member
  • Northern Arizona
User Info
Advice for Newbie Straight Razor Users
Razor care
1. Be careful they are sharp
2. Protect the edge when not in use - don't drop it, bang it against the faucet etc.
3. Don't ever put a wet razor away (dry the blade, dry the inside of the scales) and store it in a dry environment.
4. Don't handle a razor with wet hands.
5. If the razor is dropped or falls off of something, do not try to catch it. The replacement of a broken razor is cheaper than an ER visit or an ambulance ride.
6. Dry the razor, rinse under hot water and wipe dry with TP, also make sure the inside of the scales are dry. Fold TP and run it through the scales several times. Keep the razor open for an hour resting on a dry towel. Then, close the razor slowly so the edge never contacts the scales. ALWAYS do this to prevent rust.
7. Before mailing to the next member please rub down the blade with alcohol. It sanitizes, but more importantly, it dries any moisture.
 
When you shave
1. Use less pressure than you think is needed.
2. Use a shallower angle than you think is needed.
3. Do not be concerned with speed. If you are taking so long your lather dries out, just re-lather.
4. Be concerned with being comfortable while putting an insanely sharp blade you your face, not speed. Needless to say, don't try straight shaving for the first time when you are late for work.
5. Stretch the skin taught. Tight skin resists cuts. Loose floppy skin invites cuts. Dry your fingertips or use the tip of a dry washcloth to get a better grip on wet skin.
6. Tricky areas can often be shaven more easily by actually pulling the skin onto a flatter area of the face, particularly on the chin, which is the venue for probably 3/4 of the shaving cuts you will give yourself.
7. Make shaving faces. Use your facial muscles to tighten or flatten skin, or to pull against the pull of your fingertips. Pull your nose up or to the side to get upper lip.
8. Don't keep telling yourself it's sharp enough if it's not, put it down and use a different razor. Contact Dan to have the razor sharpened.
9. Start with your sideburns, don't be afraid to finish with a DE or whatever your previous method is.
10. Lather up, and use a butter knife to practice "shaving" the lather off your face. This trick works in helping you coordinate those tricky spots, off hand shaving, etc. without fear of injury.
11. A good initial shave angle is where you have a gap between spine and skin equal to the thickness of the spine. This is typically 21 to 25 degrees, significantly tighter than the 30 degrees suggested by many sources.
12. If you need a higher angle or more pressure to make a razor shave, it is probably not as sharp as it should be.
13. Don't worry about getting a perfect shave. Just concentrate on surviving the shave with minimal blood loss, minimal irritation. Closeness will come with experience.
14. Don't worry how close your shave is and, unless you are real brave, don't try your entire face at first. Do cheeks to jaw bone first, then the neck, the mustache and chin. If you only accomplish a couple of parts of a full shave while you have the box, that's a success. It takes a couple of weeks/months before it will become second nature. Be patient, don't go too fast and invest in a Styptic Pen from your local drug store. Most of all be patient with yourself!
 
Sharpness
When you receive the razors and before you send it to the next member or back to me for honing please do a sharpness test.
A good sharpness test to perform on receiving a razor is the treetopping test. Pass the razor 1/4" above the skin of your forearm. You should see at least one or two hair tips severed and laying on the blade. This indicates a reasonably sharp edge. If several hairs are treetopped, and this occurs silently with no perceptible snapback, you have a razor that is almost impossibly magically science fiction sharp. If you have to reduce the pass height to 1/8" to get treetopping, then it is marginally sharp,
 
Stroping
Follow these guidelines please.
1. When you strop your razor, you should have a firm enough hold on the shank to control it, but there shouldn't be any grip on the scales, unless you intend to break the scales.
2. Any time you strop a razor; the spine of the razor MUST be lying against the strop every time the edge touches the strop. If the spine isn’t touching while you are stropping, you are ruining the bevel angle and could damage your fine edge.
3. Strop 30 passes on leather after your shave
4. Strop 30 passes on the cloth side followed by 60 passes on leather before your shave.
5. Stropping should look like this:
 
http://straightrazorplace.com/srpwiki/index.php/Razor_stropping
 
 
 
 

4 487
Reply
 03-14-2017, 06:31 PM
#27
User Info
(12-03-2016, 06:05 AM)Newton Wrote:
(11-26-2016, 08:52 AM)whiteboy_cannon Wrote: I fear I have already messed up the edge already with my poor stropping technique. Hard to tell though, since I don't know what I'm doing yet haha

Stropping was the one area that I didn't give enough thought to when I began and proved to be one of the more difficult tasks for me to learn how to do correctly.  I ended up ordering a modular paddle strop from SRD to learn on with less variables, and progressed back to the hanging strop after I had a better idea of what I was doing.

After about six months of SR shaving the one thing that I have learned (painfully) is anytime the razor is in my hand it has the potential to cut me.  Oddly, my mistakes that have drawn significant amounts of blood have never occurred when I am moving the razor across my face.  The major damage I have done to myself are always at those moments I don't expect the razor to cut me, the worst of which is when I placed the razor on my face at a wrong angle. The most frequent is when I am cleaning the razor and not paying enough attention to where the blade is in my hand.  I have actually cut my fingers and hands more than my face.

Bottom line advice.  If your not 110% focused, don't pick the razor up : )


I know what you mean as Im dealing with a bar cut I got just from cleaning the razor!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

19 152
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)