Poll: How important is scentsa in shaving soaps/creams to you ?
Note: This is a public poll, other users will be able to see what you voted for.
 11-26-2016, 12:33 PM
#1
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First let me start out by saying, that I may well be one of the biggest fragrance heads on this forum along with a few others.

I have been into fragrances since I turned 15 years old. Now in my 40's, my fragrance journey is still ongoing.

I use fragrance every day of the year, sometimes 2 or 3 a day, if I mix them/blend them or if I use one for day and one for night.

My fragrance collection is bigger than the number of days in a year, so I can rotate my fragrances daily and still use a new one each day for a year.

Fragrances in shaving soaps and creams is also something I can appreciate, but as mentioned in an older thread, I have taken the time to think about fragrance oils used in soaps and creams and how important it really is to me.

This thread is made so I, and other fragrance enthusiasts, can get an impression of how important fragrances in shaving soaps and creams are to the shaver.

Some soaps, though rare, are heavily fragranced and the scent will last for 1-2 hours after the shave, unless you wash your face after the shave.
Most soaps and creams are fragranced, so the scent will be present for the first 2-3 minutes when lathering up, then will linger in the background during the shave and then will quite quickly vanish immediately after the shave. 

Persoanlly, unless I'm using a really strong fragranced soap/cream, I usually only really get whiffs of the scent in the soap/cream, when lathering up with my brush.
I will then get the whiffs from the lingering scent for the first 3-4-5 minutes, when I face lather and stgart my first pass.

From there and on, the scent experience honestly starts to go downhill very fast. Because the soap/cream is appplied dretly under my nose and around the beard area, I usually get anosmic to the scent quite fast, and I could just as well be using a scentless version of the soap.

For the second pass, I splash cold water on my face first, and then apply the lather with my brush. I then will get whiffs from the scent in the soap/cream again, but I still feel the scent impression is not quite there compared to when I just applied the first lather for the first pass.

After my shave is done, I use Thayers unscented witch hazel with a cotton ball, and wiote my entire head with it, and this usually removes 95%-100% of the scent in the soap/cream, leaving me with close to zero scent experience.
I then apply my after shave splash, and the scent in that will then completely overtake the scent from the soaps/cream.

How do you guys expereience fragrance and scents in your shaving soaps and shaving creams, and how important is the scent experience to you ?
Do you feel the 5-10 minutes the experience lasts for most of us, is a vital important part of the whole shaving experience to you ?

If you measure this rather short lived experience up against the 4-5-6 hours and up to 16-20 hours you get with quality EDT/EDP fragrances, do you still consider the scent experience in your shaving soaps/creams so vital and important in your shaving ritual/routine ?

I'm on the fence about this. I treasure the scents in my soaps and creams, but what really gives me my daily scent experience is not what I get from my soaps/creams and my after shave, but what I get from my daily fragrance. 
This is the real scent experience in my life, not a 5-10 minutes rather short lived scent whiff during my shave !

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 11-26-2016, 12:49 PM
#2
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My two cents , Shaving soap scent is very important to me. I hate soaps that are light in scent. Apparently , we all have different senses when it comes to scents .
Some people /nose sensitive to scent and they can't tolerate strong scent. Example my wife .

However, my nose require heavy dose of scent or I will not enjoy the shaving experience . I sold many soap due to light scent performance.
I prefer scent to last only 30 minutes as I use parfum on daily basis to work or home. As long as shaving soap give me good 30 minutes on the sink I am satisfied.

Speaking of scents today I tried the following three new scents and I am very satisfied .
Wickham 24 (creed aventus like)
Wickham cashmere
SV Stella alpina


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 11-26-2016, 12:51 PM
#3
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It used to be secondary for me, but with all the good stuff that's been coming out these days, the main criteria (among the known good ones) for me is fast becoming the scent. 

2nd criteria? Please don't be a croap.

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 11-26-2016, 01:09 PM
#4
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I find soap scents to be an extremely enjoyable part of the shaving experience and I wouldn't want to be without them. However, if I had to forego them for the performance of the soap, then I would.
Thank goodness I don't have to! Biggrin

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 11-26-2016, 02:13 PM
#5
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It's aromatherapy for me during my shave. It doesn't affect my shave at all, but it enhances my shaving experience.

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 11-26-2016, 02:15 PM
#6
  • JRRIII
  • Blossoming Addict
  • East Coast
User Info
I voted to for "Vitally Important" not because it is actually that important (even though in a way it is) but rather I have enough great performing soaps to last me for a long time and if it wasn't for the scents I wouldn't feel the need to buy anymore soaps until I actually used them all up

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 11-26-2016, 02:40 PM
#7
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Fragrance is nice, but if the soap doesn't perform....it's booted out of my den.

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 11-26-2016, 03:36 PM
#8
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I'm finding my tastes are running to simpler scents and with less strength. I think we hobbyists have pushed by large at least the artisans to keep upping the strength of the scent to a degree I'm finding almost intolerable from some. Comments like, "great soap, good performance, love the scent but wish it were stronger" for example only bolster the belief that most want it stronger and maybe they do. Perhaps I'm in the minority but if I read comments like, "opened the tub and the scent overtook my entire bathroom" I run in the other direction.

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 11-26-2016, 03:36 PM
#9
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I have zero fragrance-free soaps, and multiple scents from my favorite artisans. While soap scent isn't as important as scent in food, it's still important.

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 11-26-2016, 04:32 PM
#10
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Lightly scented and not overly complex. I have colognes and EDT's for strength, complexity and longevity.

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 11-26-2016, 04:40 PM
#11
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I find the scent can be pleasant or interesting when I first open the tub or squeeze the tube and smell the product I am using. After that, though, it quickly fades into the background for me as I concentrate on using the razor, and I basically ignore it. The protection, glide and after-feel of the soap or cream are far far more important to me than the scent. And, of course, after I splash down with Thayers Witch Hazel afterwards, any scent is gone. Even there, btw, I have Thayers original and lavender versions and can't really distinguish much scent difference between the two as I apply them...

Having said that, I favour light or mildly scented "classic" soaps and don't / won't have any of the really heavy-scented odder artisan products in my bathroom.

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 11-26-2016, 05:08 PM
#12
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If all soaps went in scented I would not be heart broken and would appreciate the ease of selection but if they are offered I find them to be very enjoyable and will continue to pick the ones I like.

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 11-26-2016, 05:19 PM
#13
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I Like smells. The olfactory sense evokes....

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 11-26-2016, 05:33 PM
#14
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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A common feature shared by humanity is the nose, aka proboscis, shnoz, snorter and snoot. The primary function  is respiration. The secondary is receiver for our olfactory sense. Is that smell food, or something wishing me to be? The first evidence of olfactory sentience and ritual behaviour is a Neanderthaler burial with flower pollens indicating prethought gathering and inclusion. All members of the surviving hominid species 'sapiens' tracing european glacial ancestry still carrry Neanderthaler DNA. This, and injury correlations with american rodeo cowboys may acount for the formerly 'brutish'  caveman's makeover in contemporary anthropological  and right wing political literature.
We ignore smell at our peril. The british cavalry outfought Napoleonic cavalry largely on horsemanship and husbandry. A british officer noted they could smell the french horses well before visual contact and make
ready at Waterloo. Is it mere coincidence Napoleon IIIs reign was marked by the blossoming of french  scentmaking? But smell can be just that. A bad soap masked with scent is just rotten meat dressed in another french invention called mayoniasse to address the problem. If a product or individual stinks the course of action is to get upwind, walk away or bury it-with or without consideration of flowers.

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 11-26-2016, 05:42 PM
#15
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Good to hear from you, Chris. Glad you're back on the scent.

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 11-26-2016, 06:33 PM
#16
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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Performance is number one, but once there is a particular brand of soap that I like for it's performance, I'm then particular about scent. I tend to pick my soap of the day based upon scent, on a whim for whatever scent seems to appeal to me at the moment. There are now so many excellent performing soaps with a variety of scents, that we can have our cake and eat it too.

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 11-26-2016, 06:45 PM
#17
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Performance is key.  If a soap doesn't perform, the quality of the scent is irrelevant.  However, I find that there are an abundance of soaps that perform well.  What separates the multitude of good performing soaps is the ability of the maker to master scents.

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 11-26-2016, 06:48 PM
#18
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
User Info
(11-26-2016, 05:33 PM)kav Wrote: A common feature shared by humanity is the nose, aka proboscis, shnoz, snorter and snoot. The primary function  is respiration. The secondary is receiver for our olfactory sense. Is that smell food, or something wishing me to be? The first evidence of olfactory sentience and ritual behaviour is a Neanderthaler burial with flower pollens indicating prethought gathering and inclusion. All members of the surviving hominid species 'sapiens' tracing european glacial ancestry still carrry Neanderthaler DNA. This, and injury correlations with american rodeo cowboys may acount for the formerly 'brutish'  caveman's makeover in contemporary anthropological  and right wing political literature.
We ignore smell at our peril. The british cavalry outfought Napoleonic cavalry largely on horsemanship and husbandry. A british officer noted they could smell the french horses well before visual contact and make
ready at Waterloo. Is it mere coincidence Napoleon IIIs reign was marked by the blossoming of french  scentmaking? But smell can be just that. A bad soap masked with scent is just rotten meat dressed in another french invention called mayoniasse to address the problem. If a product or individual stinks the course of action is to get upwind, walk away or bury it-with or without consideration of flowers.

Welcome back Chris!

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 11-26-2016, 06:51 PM
#19
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
User Info
(11-26-2016, 05:33 PM)kav Wrote: A common feature shared by humanity is the nose, aka proboscis, shnoz, snorter and snoot. The primary function  is respiration. The secondary is receiver for our olfactory sense. Is that smell food, or something wishing me to be? The first evidence of olfactory sentience and ritual behaviour is a Neanderthaler burial with flower pollens indicating prethought gathering and inclusion. All members of the surviving hominid species 'sapiens' tracing european glacial ancestry still carrry Neanderthaler DNA. This, and injury correlations with american rodeo cowboys may acount for the formerly 'brutish'  caveman's makeover in contemporary anthropological  and right wing political literature.
We ignore smell at our peril. The british cavalry outfought Napoleonic cavalry largely on horsemanship and husbandry. A british officer noted they could smell the french horses well before visual contact and make
ready at Waterloo. Is it mere coincidence Napoleon IIIs reign was marked by the blossoming of french  scentmaking? But smell can be just that. A bad soap masked with scent is just rotten meat dressed in another french invention called mayoniasse to address the problem. If a product or individual stinks the course of action is to get upwind, walk away or bury it-with or without consideration of flowers.

I couldn't have said it any better.  Biggrin It was so nice to see your post, kav.

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 11-26-2016, 06:54 PM
#20
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(11-26-2016, 05:33 PM)kav Wrote: A common feature shared by humanity is the nose, aka proboscis, shnoz, snorter and snoot. The primary function  is respiration. The secondary is receiver for our olfactory sense. Is that smell food, or something wishing me to be? The first evidence of olfactory sentience and ritual behaviour is a Neanderthaler burial with flower pollens indicating prethought gathering and inclusion. All members of the surviving hominid species 'sapiens' tracing european glacial ancestry still carrry Neanderthaler DNA. This, and injury correlations with american rodeo cowboys may acount for the formerly 'brutish'  caveman's makeover in contemporary anthropological  and right wing political literature.
We ignore smell at our peril. The british cavalry outfought Napoleonic cavalry largely on horsemanship and husbandry. A british officer noted they could smell the french horses well before visual contact and make
ready at Waterloo. Is it mere coincidence Napoleon IIIs reign was marked by the blossoming of french  scentmaking? But smell can be just that. A bad soap masked with scent is just rotten meat dressed in another french invention called mayoniasse to address the problem. If a product or individual stinks the course of action is to get upwind, walk away or bury it-with or without consideration of flowers.

It's good to see you posting again Chris!

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