11-27-2016, 09:37 AM
#1
  • Teddyboy
  • Guilty, with an explanation
  • NYC
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Does this happen to you?  You purchase a new product - can be any shaving product, blade, soap or razor.  You hope it will be spectacular - a revelation to change your shaving experience.  In your extreme passion, upon trying the product you "overdo" it.  Weepers, when they are not expected.  Your zeal then makes you question whether your technique is off, or the product is overrated and you bought in to the latest Kool Aid, or perhaps you cannot control your desire for the perfect shave.  You will ponder these possibilities until you can redeem yourself upon the next shave.

Unfortunately, it happens to me quite often.  Although I would not like knowing I am uniquely susceptible to my childish enthusiasm, I'd like to know if you feel similarly.  Don't spare my feelings - let me have it.

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 11-27-2016, 10:00 AM
#2
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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I remember my very first plastic model; a Supermarine Spitfire in 1/48 by Monogram. I was so excited I put it together in the rear facing benchseat of our hemi engine Chrysler wagon driving home from visiting relatives Christmas day.
No paint, no trimming of sprues, glue everywhere; my thumbprint on the Malcom hood, a melted hole in the wing from  glue drop. I was in worse shape from sniffing glue by accident.
I tend to shave like Micky Mouse in Fantasia. But I've learned, finally to slow down with new product. I just received Paladin soap yesterday; took my time, prepped and made my first pass. HMMM? WTF? Oh, I was so excited I forgot to put a blade in the razor.

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 11-27-2016, 07:02 PM
#3
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I think I tend to get excited by new shaving goodies as well, but I think woodworking helped me learn to temper my enthusiasm.  Talk about a hobby being able to do some serious damage...

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 11-28-2016, 02:49 AM
#4
  • beamon
  • Active Member
  • Greenville, SC USA
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For sure, Ted. You're not alone if it's any consolation. Whether we care to admit it or not, I think MOST of us long to own the latest and greatest. Only in my dotage am I finally realizing that my life hasn't been changed when I make such acquisitions. If my life changes, at all, it is only by small increments. It requires far greater happenings to makes one's life do a significant lurch in another direction. 

That shouldn't make you stop chasing a dream, however. To do so is what makes us human and differentiates us from less evolved species. Dream on and enjoy!

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 11-28-2016, 06:30 PM
#5
  • Teddyboy
  • Guilty, with an explanation
  • NYC
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(11-28-2016, 02:49 AM)beamon Wrote: For sure, Ted. You're not alone if it's any consolation. Whether we care to admit it or not, I think MOST of us long to own the latest and greatest. Only in my dotage am I finally realizing that my life hasn't been changed when I make such acquisitions. If my life changes, at all, it is only by small increments. It requires far greater happenings to makes one's life do a significant lurch in another direction. 

That shouldn't make you stop chasing a dream, however. To do so is what makes us human and differentiates us from less evolved species. Dream on and enjoy!

I agree completely.  It is just that when the day comes that I get wheeled into the ER I hope there will be at least one Wet Shaver M.D. who will understand.

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 12-03-2016, 01:36 AM
#6
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I loved the "idea" of shaving with a 100 year old razor more than the actual quality of the shave (1916 Gillette Old Type).
Still hungry for that elusive "great shave", my travels down the 1966 Flare Tip road were also disappointing.  Using different blades, the shaves ended a bit rough.  The plating is fine and polishing the razor yielded no better results.
I keep going back to my old friend, the 34C with Feather or Polsilver blades.  Based on my experiences, an old 11C might turn out to be the Holy Grail of razors.  They are few and far between though  Dodgy

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 12-03-2016, 04:53 AM
#7
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I have done this many times with lots of products, for soaps that under perform I keep trying for razors that don't shave close enough I hone again and sometimes it's just better to admit the soap is better to use in the shower and sell that razor on BST. I have had my share of weepers and post shave burn and I am done with that.

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 12-03-2016, 06:12 PM
#8
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It strikes me that there's a lot of 'the emperor's new clothes' in this hobby/craft. I keep forgetting the lesson Public Enemy taught me - 'Don't believe the Hype.' That being said, I've bought stuff out the blue that turned out to be fantastic - most recently Cella. I've been very disappointed with one of the 'new wave' British artisan soap makers that built up a head of steam on fora such as this one. No names.

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 12-03-2016, 07:36 PM
#9
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(11-27-2016, 10:00 AM)kav Wrote: I remember my very first plastic model; a Supermarine Spitfire in 1/48 by Monogram. I was so excited I put it together in the rear facing benchseat of our hemi engine Chrysler wagon driving home from visiting relatives Christmas day.
No paint, no trimming of sprues, glue everywhere; my thumbprint on the Malcom hood, a melted hole in the wing from  glue drop. I was in worse shape from sniffing glue by accident.
I tend to shave like Micky Mouse in Fantasia. But I've learned, finally to slow down with new product. I just received Paladin soap yesterday; took my time, prepped and made my first pass. HMMM? WTF? Oh, I was so excited I forgot to put a blade in the razor.

KAV that was great really gave me a good laugh!  Sisi1

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 12-18-2016, 08:37 AM
#10
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(12-03-2016, 01:36 AM)Blain Wrote: I loved the "idea" of shaving with a 100 year old razor more than the actual quality of the shave (1916 Gillette Old Type).
Still hungry for that elusive "great shave", my travels down the 1966 Flare Tip road were also disappointing.  Using different blades, the shaves ended a bit rough.  The plating is fine and polishing the razor yielded no better results.
I keep going back to my old friend, the 34C with Feather or Polsilver blades.  Based on my experiences, an old 11C might turn out to be the Holy Grail of razors.  They are few and far between though  Dodgy

Been there done that several times. The 1917 single ring ("geez, this gotta be good!"), my '60 Toggle (I spent how much?!?), the mint '47 Milord (with case)...and the best shave of all comes from the humble post-war ball-end Tech, loaded with a Voskhod.

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