08-09-2012, 10:31 PM
#1
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Gents, a friend and I wrote conjoined articles about blade shaving. I wrote the SE and DE aspects and he wrote the straight razor portion. It was submitted to a magazine where I thought it was a shoe in, but while they commented that it was well written they didn't buy it. (Backwoods Home)

I'm open to suggestions as to where to submit it.

As usual, TIA!

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 08-09-2012, 11:16 PM
#2
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Did they say why they chose not to pick it up? That may give some pointers as to the kind of magazines you should approach.

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 08-10-2012, 12:21 AM
#3
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I don't really have many suggestions as to where to submit it, but do you have it online somewhere that we could check it out?

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 08-10-2012, 12:33 AM
#4
  • tgutc
  • Senior Member
  • Michigan
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What about some men's magazines that cover a general range of topics. Examples off the top of my head are Men's Journal,
FHM, and GQ. I see them review products all the time such as Billy Jealousy and Black Jack. So, they promote this type of thing they are just not aware they are only scratching the surface. I think your article would go over well in one of those.

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 08-10-2012, 03:44 AM
#5
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Esquire May be a good one to try as well.

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 08-10-2012, 05:31 AM
#6
  • EHV
  • Senior Member
  • Milford,PA
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These are the first ones that come to my minds as well as Grant's suggestion of Esquire.

Perhaps any health related magazines as well or Eco-conscious ones as well based on the fact that wetshaving helps saves the environment somewhat.

Lastly, being ignorant about all these things; what about widespread newspaper publication somehow???

quote='tgutc' pid='69759' dateline='1344587629']
What about some men's magazines that cover a general range of topics. Examples off the top of my head are Men's Journal,
FHM, and GQ. I see them review products all the time such as Billy Jealousy and Black Jack. So, they promote this type of thing they are just not aware they are only scratching the surface. I think your article would go over well in one of those.
[/quote]

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 08-10-2012, 05:45 AM
#7
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Brian,
My wife is, amongst other things, a writer and the thing a writer learns quickly is that the rejection letters will far outweigh acceptance letters. You simply have to keep sending the article out until you get a hit. Remember though that the vast majority of magazine articles are solicited and planned. Unsolicited articles, or books that are unagented, almost always go unread.

Also, keep in mind that the magazine makes its money selling ads, not copies. Your article will be evaluated on how well it fits in with their advertiser's requirements. Does it meet the same demographic as their target market? I have no evidence, just an impression, but it seems that the wet shaving enthusiast demographic is a more affluent and better educated demographic and, dare I say it, both more urban and more international. Take a look at the threads in the Fragrance section alone. I cannot imagine the average reader of Backwoods Home having any idea what a "Guerlain Vetiver" is, but you can bet your butt that lots of GQ readers know and can name five alternatives (though they'd be stumped over what a "plumb-bob" does.)

Make a list of 20 or 30 magazines targeting men, urban style and regular topics of grooming. This is your target market. Instead of sending them the article, send them a proposal for an article.

Good luck,
m

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 08-10-2012, 06:34 AM
#8
  • tgutc
  • Senior Member
  • Michigan
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(08-10-2012, 05:45 AM)oakeshott Wrote: Brian,
My wife is, amongst other things, a writer and the thing a writer learns quickly is that the rejection letters will far outweigh acceptance letters. You simply have to keep sending the article out until you get a hit. Remember though that the vast majority of magazine articles are solicited and planned. Unsolicited articles, or books that are unagented, almost always go unread.

Also, keep in mind that the magazine makes its money selling ads, not copies. Your article will be evaluated on how well it fits in with their advertiser's requirements. Does it meet the same demographic as their target market? I have no evidence, just an impression, but it seems that the wet shaving enthusiast demographic is a more affluent and better educated demographic and, dare I say it, both more urban and more international. Take a look at the threads in the Fragrance section alone. I cannot imagine the average reader of Backwoods Home having any idea what a "Guerlain Vetiver" is, but you can bet your butt that lots of GQ readers know and can name five alternatives (though they'd be stumped over what a "plumb-bob" does.)

Make a list of 20 or 30 magazines targeting men, urban style and regular topics of grooming. This is your target market. Instead of sending them the article, send them a proposal for an article.

Good luck,
m

I agree with all of this 100%. To me wet shaving is for the most part filled with guys pursuing luxury to some extent. Readers of GQ and others similar are also. Readers of these types of magazines would eat a wet shaving article up. The majority of them just are not aware there is this other world of shaving.

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 08-10-2012, 06:47 AM
#9
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You know, I forgot to ask the obvious other question which is, why do you want to publish in a magazine? Are you just looking to get the information out there? Developing a career as a writer? Just want the one time experience of having been published? This would be useful to know in order to provide advice.

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 08-10-2012, 08:00 AM
#10
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Some straight shavers are survivalist/self sufficient men. However, that may just be the most vocal users. I hear the other forum regulars love their guns.

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 08-10-2012, 08:51 AM
#11
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(08-10-2012, 06:47 AM)oakeshott Wrote: You know, I forgot to ask the obvious other question which is, why do you want to publish in a magazine? Are you just looking to get the information out there? Developing a career as a writer? Just want the one time experience of having been published? This would be useful to know in order to provide advice.

I'm enjoying retirement too much to develop a writing career. It was a one time thing. I just thought it would be fun to do and also to spread the word. I talked to my buddy in California since I knopw nothing about straight razors, so I handled the SE and DE portion, and most everything else and he did the SR portion. He thought it would be fun too.

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 08-10-2012, 12:39 PM
#12
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Most print magazines seem to be in sharp decline, in much the same manner as traditional newspapers. Many are a mere shadow of their former selves. Perhaps it would be best to submit the article to an entity with both a print and an online presence?

How about Time? They have both printed and online editions, and the online edition is linked to CNN. Sfgate.com, the online presence of the San Francisco Chronicle, might be receptive to such an article. Of course, it would not hurt to try the New York Times, as it is widely distributed. And how about syndication agency such as Associated Press or Reuters?

Corey Greenberg, who jump started the current wetshaving renaissance, might be able to offer sage advice from an insider's perspective. He used to work for a magazine and also for NBC's Today show.

It might be worthwhile to look on magazine-directory.com to search for suitable publications for your article.

Good luck!

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 08-10-2012, 01:11 PM
#13
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(08-10-2012, 08:51 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote:
(08-10-2012, 06:47 AM)oakeshott Wrote: You know, I forgot to ask the obvious other question which is, why do you want to publish in a magazine? Are you just looking to get the information out there? Developing a career as a writer? Just want the one time experience of having been published? This would be useful to know in order to provide advice.

I'm enjoying retirement too much to develop a writing career. It was a one time thing. I just thought it would be fun to do and also to spread the word. I talked to my buddy in California since I knopw nothing about straight razors, so I handled the SE and DE portion, and most everything else and he did the SR portion. He thought it would be fun too.

Brian,
It's just my opinion and I'm not convinced it's the only way to go, but if that's the case, then you might want to look into self publishing what you and your friend have written. Amazon makes this possible as do some other services though I know little about them. You have enough love on this and other forums that I'm certain quite a few people would pay .99c or 1.99 for the article. You may want to expand it some to justify that or you may have plenty of content already, but you should seriously look at that.

I just looked up the largest circulation magazines in the US and here's a list:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mag...ted_States

I was stunned to see that the #1 mag by cirulation was AARP Magazine. I think your articles would be a natural for that mag and since you're also probably a member (I'm not only owner of hair club for men, I'm also a customer)they might seriously consider a submission. Again, you want to shoot them a proposal first and then deliver the article. Plenty of information on the interwebs about how to write a proposal for a magazine article.

Good luck.
oake

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 08-10-2012, 01:19 PM
#14
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You could submit it to blogs.

I know I'd love to not have to write every single article on my website and have guest writes.

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 08-10-2012, 03:36 PM
#15
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(08-09-2012, 11:16 PM)WegianWarrior Wrote: Did they say why they chose not to pick it up? That may give some pointers as to the kind of magazines you should approach.

(08-10-2012, 12:21 AM)andrewjs18 Wrote: I don't really have many suggestions as to where to submit it, but do you have it online somewhere that we could check it out?

+1

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 08-10-2012, 05:48 PM
#16
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No it's not on the web. I was concerned that if I did that a publisher wouldn't want it.

I might just put my portion on my website to increase traffic and to give pre-noobs some information.

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 08-10-2012, 06:46 PM
#17
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You are correct that if you post your article on line that conventional publishers won't want it even if they have a web presence. What they need for their business model is content that they own which drives views to their site or increases subscriptions.

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 08-10-2012, 08:32 PM
#18
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Good luck to you, Brian. i hope you find a solution.

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 08-11-2012, 03:49 AM
#19
  • Obie
  • Senior Member
  • Glendale, Wisconsin
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Gentlemen,

As a professional writer for some 40 years, I have had enough rejection slips to wallpaper the house. The one thing I have learned is that you have to hit the right magazine with the right article. That is still no guarantee you'll get in.

Articles on traditional shaving are hard to place. Esquire and some of the other slick magazines will occasionally run a castrated little piece on grooming, though rarely anything on traditional shaving as we know and talk about it. What's more, magazines are heavily compartmentalized these days, and on tight budgets: if it's not the perfect fit, they won't run it.

Yet there is always hope. Keep the piece short and about as general as possible. Get a copy of the Writer's Market and see who buys what. Good luck.

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 08-11-2012, 04:16 AM
#20
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(08-11-2012, 03:49 AM)Obie Wrote: Gentlemen,

As a professional writer for some 40 years, I have had enough rejection slips to wallpaper the house. The one thing I have learned is that you have to hit the right magazine with the right article. That is still no guarantee you'll get in.

Articles on traditional shaving are hard to place. Esquire and some of the other slick magazines will occasionally run a castrated little piece on grooming, though rarely anything on traditional shaving as we know and talk about it. What's more, magazines are heavily compartmentalized these days, and on tight budgets: if it's not the perfect fit, they won't run it.

Yet there is always hope. Keep the piece short and about as general as possible. Get a copy of the Writer's Market and see who buys what. Good luck.
+1
The amount of luck required in getting anything published is scary.

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