08-11-2012, 09:18 AM
#1
User Info
that Boar shaving brushes pre-date the Badger?
Any documentation either way? Pix?
Thanks.

0 68
Reply
 08-11-2012, 10:12 AM
#2
  • Teiste
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • Salt Lake City,UT
User Info
Well,you could be right about it.
Pigs were very popular and all parts of the pig were use,from the skin to the hair,so yes,it could be that boar pre date badger brushes.

86 7,123
Reply
 08-11-2012, 12:29 PM
#3
User Info
Horse might also.

I remember a thread somewhere where the history of shaiving brushes was discussed. Basically as far as popularity it came down to anthrax. Someone imported some anthrax laden horse hair brushes into the country, some people died and horse became a no-no. Badgers don't get anthrax so they were OK. Or the story went something like that.

32 6,308
Reply
 08-11-2012, 12:34 PM
#4
User Info
A good question. It sure seems as though badger hair is a recent phenomenon.

9 2,988
Reply
 08-11-2012, 12:41 PM
#5
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
User Info
I never saw a badger brush until I purchased my first one about 10-12 years ago.

173 23,486
Reply
 08-11-2012, 01:18 PM
#6
User Info
From this page on The English Shaving Company website:

"Badger Hair has been used for more than two centuries to make the best shaving brushes"

From this page on the Executive Shaving website:

"The modern shaving brush may be traced to France during the 1750s. Quality of these brushes differed greatly, as materials used to fashion the handles varied from the common to the exotic. It was not terribly uncommon for handles to be made of ivory, gold, silver, tortoise shell, crystal, or porcelain. Well-to-do men would generally shave with a badger hair brush, while commoners concerned with colloquially proper aesthetics would resort to cheaper versions made of boar's hair"

If the modern shaving brush was introduced in the 1750s, what about brushes prior to that time? It might be that the answer to your question is lost in the mists of time.

0 303
Reply
 08-11-2012, 01:42 PM
#7
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
User Info
I'm glad to know I was and still am a "commoner".

173 23,486
Reply
 08-11-2012, 01:56 PM
#8
User Info
Prior to 1750 men in Europe probably didn't shave. With the exception of monks and other godly men.

I'm more interested to know what Asian men used to generate lather and shave with. Huge hole in the history of shaving knowledge base.

9 2,988
Reply
 08-11-2012, 02:02 PM
#9
User Info
Probably they used shaving oil.

Shaving oils have been used since the Ancient Times to shave not only the face, but other body hair. The Ancient Romans and Egyptians used it.

2 5,527
Reply
 08-11-2012, 09:01 PM
#10
User Info
Can you imagine doing your doctorate on this subject matter. Now, that would be worth going back to school for. Hee hee.

75 20,883
Reply
 08-12-2012, 04:07 AM
#11
User Info
(08-11-2012, 09:01 PM)celestino Wrote: Can you imagine doing your doctorate on this subject matter. Now, that would be worth going back to school for. Hee hee.

Celestino,
This is not at all far-fetched. I came very close to getting my PhD in History and if there was no previous research on this topic, then it would have made a perfectly acceptable thesis. Depending on one's field of specialty (Labor, Social,Intellectual, Economic), all that is required is to tie in your research with some analysis supporting a "big picture" understanding. It might sound, for example, something like this:

"The ruling classes managed to secure, in part through the enclosures act but also through exercising other controls over production, a monopoly on the scarce supplies of badger (compared to horse) and thus create a separate category of "luxury" items previously unknown. Whereas at one time, commoner and royal alike shaved with identically sourced animal hairs,the new emerging class system meant that only the worker suffered scritch while the bourgeoisie got soft, dense tips with good backbone and flowthrough. (Marxist Labor History)

or:

"As the ease of mobility dramatically increased through the 19th Century, new categories of products developed to satisfy a rising taste for "luxury" that the middle class could access with its surplus income. The agricultural class quickly realized that traditional sources of income from already present animal by-products was dwarfed by the potential for "specialty" products from non-traditional sources. The importation of Chinese badger hair brushes thus helped begin the gradual move away from traditional agricultural business models based on standards, to one in which the Limited Edition became the mark of both taste and excellence." (Social Historian)

or what I might have enjoyed writing had I stayed in the field:

"With the rise of rationalism it was impossible for any Frenchman with a degree from the Ecole Normale Superiore or an Englishman from Oxford or Cambridge to accept the shaving metaphors handed down from the previous generation. Throwing off traditional forms and questioning the efficacy of their father's norms, the generation after the revolution of 1848 replaced horsehair with badger and began to triple mill their soaps with moisturizers. By the end of the century, their questioning of the efficacy of all traditional methodologies would lead not only to Schoenberg's twelve tone system, Freudian psychology, futurism and Marxism, but to the development of the "safety razor"and the inexorable and fatal march to the now dominant cartridge system of shaving" (Intellectual History)

See? It's really not that hard...except for all the research and writing one has to do.

5 298
Reply
 08-12-2012, 04:12 AM
#12
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
User Info
oakeshott, that was VERY good.

173 23,486
Reply
 08-12-2012, 05:38 AM
#13
User Info
(08-12-2012, 04:12 AM)Johnny Wrote: oakeshott, that was VERY good.

Johnny,
I blush. Thank you.

Seriously though, Celestino's comment got me to thinking what a fertile area for research this actually would be. Going to take a peek and see if anyone's actually done any of this.
oake

In case any of you think I exaggerate the language or concepts in the short parody I did, after a few minutes of googling, I found this abstract from an actual periodical:


Razors, Shaving and Gender Construction: An Inquiry into the Material Culture of Shaving
"Physical appearance is an important aspect of an individual's sense of personal identity, particularly in the context of the modern consumer society. The purpose of this study is to explore the ways in which the processes and material components of one particular grooming practice, namely shaving, both reflect and reinforce traditional gender distinctions in modern North American culture. Drawing on a variety of theories and methodologies, this paper attempts to identify the symbolic categories embedded in razor design, and to suggest some of the ways in which these symbolic meanings are circulated. This preliminary exploration suggests that modern shaving practices are a ritualistic process embodying traditional cultural gender prescriptions, and that manufacturers and marketers of these products almost universally incorporate specific ranges of associative imagery in their designs."

the link

5 298
Reply
 08-17-2012, 04:37 AM
#14
User Info
(08-12-2012, 04:07 AM)oakeshott Wrote:
(08-11-2012, 09:01 PM)celestino Wrote: Can you imagine doing your doctorate on this subject matter. Now, that would be worth going back to school for. Hee hee.

Celestino,
This is not at all far-fetched. I came very close to getting my PhD in History and if there was no previous research on this topic, then it would have made a perfectly acceptable thesis. Depending on one's field of specialty (Labor, Social,Intellectual, Economic), all that is required is to tie in your research with some analysis supporting a "big picture" understanding. It might sound, for example, something like this:

"The ruling classes managed to secure, in part through the enclosures act but also through exercising other controls over production, a monopoly on the scarce supplies of badger (compared to horse) and thus create a separate category of "luxury" items previously unknown. Whereas at one time, commoner and royal alike shaved with identically sourced animal hairs,the new emerging class system meant that only the worker suffered scritch while the bourgeoisie got soft, dense tips with good backbone and flowthrough. (Marxist Labor History)

or:

"As the ease of mobility dramatically increased through the 19th Century, new categories of products developed to satisfy a rising taste for "luxury" that the middle class could access with its surplus income. The agricultural class quickly realized that traditional sources of income from already present animal by-products was dwarfed by the potential for "specialty" products from non-traditional sources. The importation of Chinese badger hair brushes thus helped begin the gradual move away from traditional agricultural business models based on standards, to one in which the Limited Edition became the mark of both taste and excellence." (Social Historian)

or what I might have enjoyed writing had I stayed in the field:

"With the rise of rationalism it was impossible for any Frenchman with a degree from the Ecole Normale Superiore or an Englishman from Oxford or Cambridge to accept the shaving metaphors handed down from the previous generation. Throwing off traditional forms and questioning the efficacy of their father's norms, the generation after the revolution of 1848 replaced horsehair with badger and began to triple mill their soaps with moisturizers. By the end of the century, their questioning of the efficacy of all traditional methodologies would lead not only to Schoenberg's twelve tone system, Freudian psychology, futurism and Marxism, but to the development of the "safety razor"and the inexorable and fatal march to the now dominant cartridge system of shaving" (Intellectual History)

See? It's really not that hard...except for all the research and writing one has to do.

(Political History)
Nice job oakeshott, gave me a flashback to grad school. I have my BA and MA in History and almost went for the PhD too.

0 433
Reply
 08-17-2012, 05:37 AM
#15
User Info
(08-17-2012, 04:37 AM)cryhavoc Wrote: Nice job oakeshott, gave me a flashback to grad school. I have my BA and MA in History and almost went for the PhD too.

cryhavoc,
I also ran across a journal article abstract on the history and development of cleanliness in America. Of course I haven't had access to these articles in 20 years, but my former grad school office mate who stayed in the field does and he sent it to me. If you're interested in reading it, drop me a pm with your email addy and I'll send you the pdf.
oake

5 298
Reply
 08-24-2012, 06:13 AM
#16
User Info
You done real good! Clap

0 554
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)