01-08-2017, 08:16 AM
#21
User Info
Slippery grip might be solved by dipping the object and the object then has a rubbery coating- not sure what it is called.

[Image: shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcSsOnRwCw3ggW1YGngNw...g&usqp=CAE]
[Image: shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcQcchBkoCF6pml2BUOvr...Q&usqp=CAY]


14.5oz. Red Color Guardtough Rubber Coating 44234985
from WaresDirect.com
Dip, spray or brush to apply. Great for tools, metals, electrical connections, masonry, wood, conveyors, glass, rope, and fabric. Meets ASTM E-96 moisture resistance, ASTM B ...more »Dip, spray or brush to apply. Great for tools, metals, electrical connections, masonry, wood, conveyors, glass, rope, and fabric. Meets ASTM E-96 moisture resistance, ASTM B 117 salt spray testing, ASTMG-53-84 accelerated 10 year weather test, and CFIA. Tough rubber coating Inhibits rust and corrosion Use to 200-F Non-slip grip Dip or brush on Applications: Coats metal, most plastics, glass, epoxy glass, concrete, fabric, foam, fiberglass, masonry, rubber, and wood.« less

34 842
Reply
 01-08-2017, 12:27 PM
#22
  • Steelman
  • SUPPORT OUR POLICE OFFICERS
  • Delaware
User Info
Wonderful thread and congratulations on your determination.

Perhaps you can consider a PILS razor?  It is a wonderful razor.....just 2 piece razor and not 3, so maybe easier to insert the blade.  It's head is similar in design to the Tradere, in that the blade is covered on the sides...less chance of injury.  It is a very efficient razor and forgiving.

The handle is the hangup...it's smooth and may be too slippery.  But a good solution to the problem is to add some round rubber gasket rings onto the handle, as some other members have done...to make it more "grippy".

148 1,218
Reply
 01-08-2017, 01:32 PM
#23
  • celar36
  • Enjoying Life 1 shave at time
  • London, UK
User Info
@Steelman I am thinking about PILS for long time as is beautiful but I am afraid that like rest of SB, it will fail with my beard. 

I might ask somebody in UK to loan me one and see.

11 878
Reply
 01-13-2017, 06:46 AM
#24
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
User Info
I apologize for the ramble

7 2,192
Reply
 01-13-2017, 10:43 AM
#25
  • Harvey
  • Senior Member
  • North Hills CA
User Info
Two other thoughts....Heat shrink tubing and switch to the Merkur CHUNKY handle comes in red or blue or can be wire brushed off or chemically removed with lye.....Usually can still be purchased on E bay...look under Merkur Chunky razors sell for $30 to $60 ...I think the model # 30 Blue and #31 Red

6 1,972
Reply
 01-13-2017, 03:52 PM
#26
  • vuk
  • Senior Member
  • Virginia
User Info
To prevent dropping the razor while shaving you could try attaching a strap by tying a loop that's fixed at the top and bottom of the handle so it wraps around the back of the hand. Maybe with paracord or something and if it works make a nicer one out of leather.
Something similar to this spoon designed for people with Parkinsons

[Image: giphy.gif]

2 515
Reply
 01-14-2017, 02:52 AM
#27
User Info
Jack,

Johnnie said it best, this simply is one of the best posts ever.  Your love of wet shaving is clear and your ingenuity to make it work for you is terrific!

Hat's off to you my friend.

3 456
Reply
 01-18-2017, 05:35 PM
#28
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
User Info
I'm disabled but the main way it affects my wet shaving is its often hard to stand up long enough. It's a factor in whether or not I go through my whole preshave process, all three or four passes and a complete post shave or just not shave. Some days I can make it standing but my hand's not steady enough.

7 2,192
Reply
 01-18-2017, 06:06 PM
#29
  • Steelman
  • SUPPORT OUR POLICE OFFICERS
  • Delaware
User Info
(01-13-2017, 06:46 AM)Mouser Wrote: I apologize for the ramble


You had nothing to apologize for.

148 1,218
Reply
 01-19-2017, 04:44 PM
#30
User Info
Jack, I know a guy who posts on another forum who was born with only 1 arm. He shaves with a straight razor every day, and many times with a Kamisori in the traditional  "Omote against the face" manner. He is also a honmeister, and I have had him hone several razors of mine. I have full use of both of my arms and hands, so I can't give any advice on how to approach this. But I do know that with patience, it can be done.

0 27
Reply
 01-21-2017, 08:34 AM
#31
  • doc47
  • Active Member
  • Northern Arizona
User Info
(01-08-2017, 04:00 AM)celar36 Wrote: Another thing is undoing Head of razor to remove blade. Only way I can do it is by wedging razor comb corner against top of my finger and nail. I need to be very careful.

Injectors were sadly not for me and I tried few of them. Annoying my skin too much.


I also always look for Gillette Popular as is TTO with 77 NEW head but still no luck in that department.


Best grip on handle I had on UFO Colibri but I was stupid enough to let it go... Don't even remember why I did that.


With Loading blade I do sometimes put on wash cloth. As stated baby changing table is great helper for me to maintain my razor. I don't fear of dropping itSmile
Have you tried a Gillette Senator TTO Open Comb? The reason I ask is it is a lighter razor and a bit smaller, and I think they are more available. I will choose it on days my arthritis is flaring up.

4 384
Reply
 01-21-2017, 08:47 AM
#32
  • doc47
  • Active Member
  • Northern Arizona
User Info
I spent my career working with blind children and adults. In 40 years I learned a lot about over coming limitations of all types. During that time I learned one very important thing; don't accept someone saying you can't. I have a totally blind friend on another forum who shaves with a straight, strops and hones his own razors. I have crippling arthritis in my hands and it creates many unwanted difficulties with shaving, all I can do is persevere and try different approaches until I achieve my objective. Patience and perserverance is a great starting point. Please let me know if I may help in any way.

4 384
Reply
 02-24-2017, 12:16 PM
#33
  • Quando
  • Active Member
  • The Galactic Empire
User Info
I am permanently injured.  My injuries have resulted in disability.  My injuries were/are service related.  The details of my service remain classified.  I served in the Swiss Army.   Unus Pro Omnibus, Omnes Pro Uno.  Sieg Oder Tod.  Hop Suisse. 

Anyway, sometimes, it hurt to hold the brush.  Other times, my arm gets tired from lathering.  It can be taxing to have to stand for as long as I need to to shave.  

Sometimes, rarely, but, sometimes, I have to stop and stretch, and/or wait a few moments before continuing, because the pain gets so bad.

0 304
Reply
 03-03-2017, 03:06 AM
#34
  • DaveL
  • Member
  • Houston, Texas
User Info
I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis 22 years ago and I'm still walking I use a cane and my left leg is braced from knee to foot. I also have restricted use of my left arm and hand. The biggest difficulty I have is holding a soap dish but I've managed fairly well.

2 128
Reply
 03-03-2017, 07:51 AM
#35
User Info
Just on a general note, weight of shaving gear probably makes a real difference for a number of people with various disabilities.  I have post-polio syndrome, with progressive muscle and strength loss in my upper extremities, especially my dominant left arm, and I am finding that titanium razor handles are significantly easier for me to use than stainless steel handles and smaller, acrylic and wooden handled brushes are easier for me to maneuver than larger and stone handles brushes.

202 12,131
Reply
 03-27-2017, 12:29 PM
#36
User Info
What a great thread.  I have Cerebral Palsy on my left side.  I have learned two things as I have been shaving.  First, when I bowl lather shaving cream, I have to press the bowl against my chest and press the bowl against my chest as best as I can.  
Second, I cannot hold a jar of shave soap, so I lay a washcloth down on the counter and then place the jar on the washcloth.  This way I'm able to lather the soap without the jar sliding all over the counter.  
Also, I cannot shave with my  hand and stretch the skin with the other hand.  So, I have learned to just shave really slowly, especially around my Adam's apple.  It takes longer this way, but I don't mind.  


Wayne

0 17
Reply
 05-01-2017, 04:42 AM
#37
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
User Info
(01-18-2017, 06:06 PM)Steelman Wrote:
(01-13-2017, 06:46 AM)Mouser Wrote: I apologize for the ramble


You had nothing to apologize for.

Thanks Steelman, I've just never been comfortable discussing my problem and never wanted people looking at me differently or adjusting/changing the way they did or played something. I denied and wouldn't accept what it eventually morphed into so much I drained our savings traveling the country trying to find someone who could fix it. When I finally faced the truth our Senator Bill Nelsen personally saved us from disaster.

7 2,192
Reply
 05-10-2017, 11:03 AM
#38
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
User Info
Another issue is that  the constant, chronic, severe pain is draining and fatigueing. To the point that even the prospect of having to make a phone call to resolve an issue is often more than i can face. Its one reason i post here less than i used to. Coupled with a very real problem in my state of abuse and death from the only medical solution that actually helps and its harder and harder. Not harder to find doctors willing to prescribe it, every specialist ive seen around the country has told me its my only option, but getting pharmacies who will fill it. Theres an atmosphere of fear to put themselves in the situation. But im rambling again. So more and more often I have to take the faster option and shave with canned goo and a disposable. But I'm ashamed to be complaining when I read what others have overcome.

7 2,192
Reply
 05-10-2017, 03:55 PM
#39
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
User Info
(01-18-2017, 05:35 PM)Mouser Wrote: I'm disabled but the main way it affects my wet shaving is its often hard to stand up long enough. It's a factor in whether or not I go through my whole preshave process, all three or four passes and a complete post shave or just not shave. Some days I can make it standing but my hand's not steady enough.

Until roughly nine months ago, I could merely imagine and try to sympathize with that sentiment, but I waited too long to get my knee replaced, and throughout the six-month run-up to surgery, and also for the first month after the surgery, I experienced exactly of what you write.  

Fortunately, I found a partial solution that (may) work for you also.  The plumbing manufacturer Moen makes a specialized product this is a true masterpiece of design:   Moen DN7100 Shower Chair.  Everything about its design and execution is near-perfect, and  I cannot recommend it highly enough.  The chair’s leg height is adjustable, so the getting down to sit and getting up from sitting problems are minimized.  The peculiar-looking arm pommels are exactly positioned to be directly under one’s center of gravity as one stands up from the chair, and the entire assembly is as stable as an Egyptian pyramid, giving a reassuring feeling that one simply cannot tip it over or fall off of it.  Mine is adjusted high enough that I can see my entire face in the medicine cabinet door mirror as I sit in front of the sink.   It is sold through (among other places) the giant on-line retailer named after a warlike race of women of myth and legend, for which a major South American river also is named.

0 972
Reply
 05-11-2017, 03:32 AM
#40
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
User Info
Damn! Mel thats certainly something to look into and pursue. Thanks very much for that heads up.
And i wish you the best with your knee and everything else in your life.
Damn I love this forum.

7 2,192
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)