01-09-2017, 10:55 AM
#1
  • Bony
  • Active Member
  • New York , USA
User Info
[Image: 9cgVi3n.jpg][Image: jUSn5IE.jpg]Greetings gentlemen ! Few weeks ago I had the luck of dropping this beautiful Plisson HMW size 16 in horn . Now you see the result : this crack on the base of the handle . Does anyone know person or shop who can restore brushes or advise me how to do it myself ? Thank you in advance. 
[Image: j8VUTV1.jpg]

9 356
Reply
 01-09-2017, 11:02 AM
#2
User Info
Some clear 2 part epoxy should stabilize the crack. Devcon makes a 2 part clear 5 minute epoxy in a dual syringe setup which is very to use. Sells at Lowes for about $4.

As with any epoxy, less is more.

Good luck.

10 335
Reply
 01-09-2017, 11:19 AM
#3
User Info
Sorry this happened to you with such an iconic brush.  I hope you get some good advice.  You may want to email Rudy Vey or Bernd at Shavemac.

38 3,640
Reply
 01-09-2017, 04:53 PM
#4
User Info
I'm not a brush restorer, but with something like epoxy, the key might be to experiment with mixing in pigments until you get a mixture that dries close to the color of the brush.  Then I'd imagine you'd sand with very fine grit paper until everything's flush, and then polish so you get the right sheen.  Again, I could be totally wrong, but that's how I might try to go about it myself.

0 982
Reply
 01-09-2017, 05:23 PM
#5
User Info
I have restored a number of vintage brushes and used Devcon 2-part epoxy to repair dents and dings.  As the previous gentleman said, less is more on the epoxy. You will need to get some very, very fine wet sand paper to sand down the epoxy and then some plastic polish to finish.

If you will PM me with your mailing address I will send you some 600/800/1000/1200 grit wet sanding paper. Remember go slow; don't over do it on the epoxy; let the epoxy set; take the sanding slow and easy. It won't be perfect as new but I believe you will be able have a nice, usable brush.

Good luck,
Ed

20 725
Reply
 01-09-2017, 05:48 PM
#6
User Info
You've gotten some very good advice, so no need for repeating.  Cool

0 558
Reply
 01-09-2017, 06:24 PM
#7
  • MaxP
  • Senior Member
  • Madison, WI
User Info
If you want the crack repair to be nearly invisible, find a dental lab. The epoxies and colorants they use will make for a non-noticeable repair.

If you want it stabilized and appearance is somewhat secondary, then, as suggested, a good epoxy will do the job for a mode$t amount.

47 1,441
Reply
 01-10-2017, 09:08 AM
#8
  • Bony
  • Active Member
  • New York , USA
User Info
Thank you for all those good advices . I will try to contact with friend who work for dental lab and report .

9 356
Reply
 01-10-2017, 10:23 AM
#9
User Info
(01-10-2017, 09:08 AM)Bony Wrote: Thank you for all those good advices . I will try to contact with friend who work for dental lab and report .

Interested to see how this works out.  Never thought of a dental lab, but it makes complete sense.  Good luck!

4 350
Reply
 01-10-2017, 10:54 AM
#10
  • MaxP
  • Senior Member
  • Madison, WI
User Info
(01-10-2017, 09:08 AM)Bony Wrote: Thank you for all those good advices . I will try to contact with friend who work for dental lab and report .

Good deal.  I'll be looking to hear how it turns out for you.  Beautiful brush BTW

47 1,441
Reply
 01-10-2017, 11:02 AM
#11
  • Bony
  • Active Member
  • New York , USA
User Info
(01-10-2017, 10:54 AM)MaxP Wrote:
(01-10-2017, 09:08 AM)Bony Wrote: Thank you for all those good advices . I will try to contact with friend who work for dental lab and report .

Good deal.  I'll be looking to hear how it turns out for you.  Beautiful brush BTW
Yes most beautiful brush in my collection . I almost got  heart attack after seen the damage  .Now I prefer someone else, to restore this brush.

9 356
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)