01-20-2017, 12:06 AM
#1
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Hmm... I've been thinking.

I saw 5, 10 years for boar, 20 something for badgers. No idea for synthetics.

I am mostly using my synthetics, but I do have badger brushes that I treasure, however, I use them extremely rarely, perhaps once or twice a year for each, some may not even see water. 

Are these brushes likely going to deteriorate over time or is it safe to assume that I could very well pass these brushes in near perfect shape on to my two toddlers when they grow up, perhaps even my future grand sons? 

Those I use on occasion, I air out for a whole day or two, and then it goes in a cabinet in my room.

All insights and opinions are most welcome

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 01-20-2017, 12:37 AM
#2
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I think having a rotation helps. If you use one brush daily, it never really dries.

Rotating 5-7 brushes would be my preference.

I currently rotate 40-45 brushes.

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 01-20-2017, 06:11 AM
#3
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(01-20-2017, 12:37 AM)CHSeifert Wrote: I think having a rotation helps. If you use one brush daily, it never really dries.

Rotating 5-7 brushes would be my preference.

I currently rotate 40-45 brushes.

40-45  Biggrin you win.... I have 19 in rotation and thought I had alot, I have set a limit of 20 for my collection.

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 01-20-2017, 07:26 AM
#4
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I would use them once in a while.

Vintage brushes of any kind can dry out and start losing hairs. Well, current "vintage" brushes. No telling yet how modern glues will hold up. The hairs though could get dry and brittle over time. Keep them out of direct light and somewhere with some circulation when not in use. If they're fully dry and you intend to not use them for a very long period of time I would say that a more appropriate method of storage would be either in the original packaging or in a tube. 

I don't see why you wouldn't be able to pass along any brush to the next generation. Knots can be replaced if it comes down to it. For as little as you say you're using the badgers they ought to be good I think.

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 01-20-2017, 01:52 PM
#5
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(01-20-2017, 07:26 AM)bakerbarber Wrote: I would use them once in a while.

Vintage brushes of any kind can dry out and start losing hairs. Well, current "vintage" brushes. No telling yet how modern glues will hold up. The hairs though could get dry and brittle over time. Keep them out of direct light and somewhere with some circulation when not in use. If they're fully dry and you intend to not use them for a very long period of time I would say that a more appropriate method of storage would be either in the original packaging or in a tube. 


I don't see why you wouldn't be able to pass along any brush to the next generation. Knots can be replaced if it comes down to it. For as little as you say you're using the badgers they ought to be good I think.


Thanks for the response gents.


You hit the nail on the head, Todd. This is exactly what I was afraid of happening, the brushes deteriorates by itself. Hmm...

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 01-20-2017, 02:02 PM
#6
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Actually I would say if one would rotate 2-3 brushes, you could make the brushes last a very long time, 3-5 years depending on how well the brush is made.

If you have brushes, that you really want to have for many years in your collection, then I would not suggest using them more often than once a week or so.

This is why I recommend 5-7 brushes as the ideal rotation number, if you own brushes, that you really appreciate.

But 2-3 brushes would be just fine.
Then the brush can dry completely between uses, but the wear on it will still be significant after a couple of years, so 5-7 brushes would be my ideal number for a brush rotation.

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 01-20-2017, 02:05 PM
#7
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(01-20-2017, 06:11 AM)Panther308 Wrote:
(01-20-2017, 12:37 AM)CHSeifert Wrote: I think having a rotation helps. If you use one brush daily, it never really dries.

Rotating 5-7 brushes would be my preference.

I currently rotate 40-45 brushes.

40-45  Biggrin you win.... I have 19 in rotation and thought I had alot, I have set a limit of 20 for my collection.

We have several members in here with more brushes than that, I have actually sold off 100+ badger brushes since 2014, because my taste has changed from liking a lot of backbone, to appreciating softer brushes, that still are not floppy.

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 01-20-2017, 02:09 PM
#8
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Great question! I've been wondering about this myself for some time.
Maybe one of the in house brush makers can give their expert opinion; Simpson, The Varlet or Paladin....

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 01-20-2017, 02:51 PM
#9
  • EricM
  • Senior Member
  • Encinitas, CA
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I've also been wondering about this.  I normally rotate a brush a week and circulate amongst 7 or so.

Eric

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 01-20-2017, 11:03 PM
#10
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My father has been using the same boar brush he bought in England as a college student back in 1960. He has exclusively used the same brush for 57 years! It has a barber shop handle; the bristles are attached to a resin top while the grip area is made of wood.   The wood section of the brush has lost some of its lacquer along the bottom/base. I don't know how dense the brush originally was, but it is currently as dense as an Omega plastic colors brush--the under $10 Omegas with the Persian vase style handle.

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 01-21-2017, 12:07 AM
#11
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(01-20-2017, 11:03 PM)Mon Wrote: My father has been using the same boar brush he bought in England as a college student back in 1960. He has exclusively used the same brush for 57 years! It has a barber shop handle; the bristles are attached to a resin top while the grip area is made of wood.   The wood section of the brush has lost some of its lacquer along the bottom/base. I don't know how dense the brush originally was, but it is currently as dense as an Omega plastic colors brush--the under $10 Omegas with the Persian vase style handle.


That's amazing!!! Here you go!!
Thought I will say, they don't make them like they used to!

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