11-20-2017, 08:49 AM
#21
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(11-20-2017, 06:52 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Biggrin   Good for you! Let us know how you like it.

When you season it look for the color change that tells you the bottom is seasoned. It will very noticeable. Keep going after you start to see it. If you use the salt, oil, and potato peel method you want the peels very dark and crispy, then you know it's well seasoned. It will smoke a lot so either do it under a vented hood or outside if you have that capability. I find the smoke generated, at least with flax seed oil, to be choking and intolerable.

There are other ways to season that are less smoky, but the method Matfer wants you to use works nicely and is quite foolproof. When mine needs a touchup I just get the dry pan up to sizzling temp' on the stovetop. Then when it's hot enough I just put a 1/2 tsp (approx') in the pan and wipe it out and spread it with a paper towel. The coating must be microscopic for this to work. If it's visible and runny that's far too much oil. Then I let it cool and bring it up to temp' again to make sure all of the oil has polymerized. The wet sheen from the oil film will be seen to become matte. When the pan is cool, the fingers run over the pan will be dry.

If it does need "washing" I never use anything more aggressive than a paper towel and warm water. It's been said that detergent can be used but I've never tested that. Warm water and a paper towel has never failed me yet. I only use that when something has oozed juices that adhered and burned on. Most times it just gets wiped (only if required) and put back on the stovetop.
The only problem I've encountered was scrubbing enough to remove the wax, under hot running water. Either I don't remove the entire coating, or the steel rusts before I dry it up.
The salt+potato peels+oil works great, except for one time that the salt+peels stuck like hell to the pan for unknown reason.
What do you do about the handle? Do you coat it with oil as well? I didn't bother scrubbing it, and after one time using the pan in the oven it really discolored (I don't think it rusted or anything).

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 11-20-2017, 09:25 AM
#22
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The one time I heated the pan before wiping it removed all of the seasoning. Maybe I got it too hot? I dunno, I never repeated it.

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 11-20-2017, 09:31 AM
#23
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I bought 3 De Buyer Mineral B carbon steel pans, 24cm/28cm/32cm and also gave my father 2 De Buyer Carbon steel pans as a present.

I helped my father seasoning his pans and they work perfect for him. He makes egg and bacon 365 days a year each morning, so for him the carbon steel pans are perfect.

I also gave him a Mauviel 5-ply pan for when using wine as a deglaze when searing meat.

I only use my De Buyer Carbon steel pans for omelettes and delicate fish now. Since I always deglaze with wine and vinegar, carbon steel pans are not the optimal thing for searing meat for my preferences.
I ended up buying 2 Demeyere 7-ply Pawson pans for all my meat searing.

If you don’t deglaze in wine/vinegar, carbon steel pans are really nice all-purpose pans. But for me they are great Select-purpose pans, but not for everything.

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 11-21-2017, 03:55 AM
#24
  • Rufus
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Thanks for the advice guys.  Seeing that seasoning the pan will create a lot of smoke and my smoke detectors are wired into the local fire station, I think I should do the seasoning on my gas grill.  Is it advisable to do this?

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 11-21-2017, 06:23 AM
#25
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As long as you can get it hot enough I don't see why it won't work. You might need to remove the grates to get the pan close enough to the burner.

Or don't use the smoke generating salt, oil, and potato skin method and go straight to heating the pan and give it the microscopic film of oil method. It'll still produce smoke but not in large quantities. If you do that, it might need to be done twice. You'll know when you use it. It can always be seasoned again if needed.

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 12-01-2017, 03:43 PM
#26
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Rufus, how dd you make out?

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 12-01-2017, 07:01 PM
#27
  • Rufus
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  • Greater Toronto Area
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(12-01-2017, 03:43 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Rufus, how dd you make out?

Smoke everywhere, so had to cut it short. I will try to do it on the Weber grill outside.

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 02-05-2018, 12:35 PM
#28
  • Rufus
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  • Greater Toronto Area
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(12-01-2017, 07:01 PM)Rufus Wrote:
(12-01-2017, 03:43 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Rufus, how dd you make out?

Smoke everywhere, so had to cut it short. I will try to do it on the Weber grill outside.

Successfully seasoned the pan a while back and have been using it. At first I didn’t think I’d seasoned it properly as it didn’t look quite like the pans I’d seen in several videos. Nevertheless, I decided to give it a try and what a revelation. It worked flawlessly: not a hint of sticking and the heat distribution was even across the pan. I’ve used several non-stick pans from the ‘big name brands’, but not one of them performed anywhere near as well as the MB. In a word carbon steel is OUTSTANDING.

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 02-05-2018, 02:23 PM
#29
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Glad you're liking it so far!

It's the chefs secret weapon! Just don't cooks sauces or anything else "wet" in it and it'll stay seasoned. You'll have a few setbacks as you learn what can and can't be done with them, but that's to be expected. When rinsing it, no hot pan and cold water. That'll strip the pan in a heartbeat. But cold pan, warm water and a paper towel is fine. When I cook things that exude that's how I get rid of the exuded stuff. Hot pan and spatula works great for some exuded stuff. The pan releases the sticky stuff to the spatula. It's just experience.

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 02-07-2018, 02:32 AM
#30
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I’m still loving my De Buyer Mineral B Carbon Steel pans.
Only issue I have is that I have to make sure I don’t deglaze in wine or vinegar or add tomato to the pans to ensure the seasoning is not harmed.

Other than that, these pans are simply amazing.

I preferably use my De Buyer 28cm and 24cm frying pans for meat and eggs. Two areas where these pans excel to almost perfection.

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 02-25-2018, 03:58 PM
#31
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An attempt to add life, I have a few pieces of Staub, which I really like better than the Lodge I owned in the past. Mainly the fact Staub is enameled and that makes cleaning soooooo simple. Has a non-stick interior finish which is real nice.

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 03-18-2018, 09:21 AM
#32
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I took all my cast iron pans (and pot) and soaked them in a lye bath for two days.  I then sanded them down with an orbital sander at 80-220 grit until it showed a reflection.  A couple of rounds in the oven with grapeseed oil and they came out brown/black with the smoothest surface I have ever used in a pan.  The seasoning is harder to stick than without the sanding and is much thinner, but makes for better cleaning, no flaking, and absolutely great cooking.

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 03-26-2018, 05:04 PM
#33
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I found a 12" lodge cast iron pan at Target for $16.00.  I promptly bought it, gave it a lye bath (easy to do when you own a soap company), sanded it down to a mirror finish with an orbital sander, and then seasoned it.  Less than half the cost of a carbon steel pan, has a top, and mirror smooth.  It works GREAT!

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 03-26-2018, 05:12 PM
#34
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I like cast iron a bit better. I have new and vintage skillets. Differences are minimal IMO.

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 04-01-2018, 02:56 PM
#35
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(03-26-2018, 05:12 PM)lloydrm Wrote: I like cast iron a bit better. I have new and vintage skillets. Differences are minimal IMO.

Not for crêpes. For crêpes carbon steel wins hands down.

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 Yesterday, 07:39 AM
#36
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The other day I made a mistake and cooked something in the CS pan that had too much water content for too long a period of time and "bubbled up" some of the seasoning. So I yad to strip the rest of the pan of it's seasoning. I tried and couldn't strip it. I tried boiling detergent water in it, scrubbing afterward and was unsuccessful. So I wound up just smoothing out the areas with and without seasoning with a scotch brite pad and reseasoned the stripped areas. It's wonderfully non-stick once again.

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