01-24-2017, 08:03 AM
#1
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I would like to switch the Ferrel on 2 of my ER 100 brushes like the models in the photo below but cant figure out how to take them apart without destroying the bases.

Any tips for how to accomplish this?

[Image: LlZGVKW.jpg]

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 01-26-2017, 07:29 AM
#2
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Great question!  The best way to do it goes like this....

  1. Cut off as much of the knot as you can using a pair of sharp scissors.  Get as close to the ferrule as possible.
  2. If you have access to a drill press, start with a small bit (like 3/8") and drill to the base of the knot.  Go slowly and be careful because EverReady's typically have only a small plastic partition separating the ferrule from the rest of the handle--and it's VERY easy to drill through it.  (Because many of these handles are hollow, if you drill through this partition, you'going to have to fill the entire handle with something in order to support the new knot.  (P.S. I've used 5-minute epoxy  Undecided ) Seriously though:  if you do go through--and you probably wii--all's not lost because filling the entire handle gives the entire brush a much nicer feel.  Angel
  3. Repeat the process using progressively larger bits until you get close to the edge of the knot, then
  4. Using a Dremel (or similar tool) carefully grind out the remaining pieces of knot.
  5. You should now be ready to set your new knot.
Good luck.  Take it slowly--and have fun!

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 01-26-2017, 07:49 AM
#3
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Great explanation of how to get the knot out Brad.

I think he's asking about swapping the top half of the handle onto the base of another handle though.

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 01-26-2017, 08:00 AM
#4
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(01-26-2017, 07:49 AM)bakerbarber Wrote: Great explanation of how to get the knot out Brad.

I think he's asking about swapping the top half of the handle onto the base of another handle though.

Oops! Best bet is to saw them apart with a very fine saw.  (More coffee indicated.  Blush )

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 01-26-2017, 10:25 AM
#5
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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I see you found your brushes! Awesome!
I am not sure I would attempt to saw them in half. The bottom part of the handle has a lip that slips into the top half; this is where they put the glue to hold the two halves together. Might be difficult to line them up exactly to glue together without that lip. And there wouldn't be much gluing surface. I personally would not attempt it. YMMV.
When I restored mine, removing the knot the handle ended up coming apart on it's own. The glue basiclly failed.
What I would try is to set the handle in a sink of hot tap water, as hot as your tap can get, and let it sit. Keep adding hot water when it starts to cool.  After a while soaking, grab the handle on both sides and wiggle, twist, etc., carefully, and see if you can get it to separate. Might take a while, might work, might not. But that is what I would try.  I bet you at least a couple of those will come loose. DO NOT use boiling water, it will most likely deform your brush handle.
Good luck, my friend!
You might also try a hairdryer, or a combination of the two, but again, be careful not to get it too hot.

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 01-26-2017, 10:34 AM
#6
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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That black and gold one is beautiful, too, btw. Would love to see it when you are done.

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 02-21-2018, 01:02 PM
#7
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In case there is some random interest, I figured out how to do this.   I did not take step by step photos as I was not sure it would work, but I think my explanation is nearly self explanatory.

I took a kitchen towel and folded it several times and put the brush inside of it but left it open on 1 side so I could see how I was working.   I then used a pair of adjustable pliers and spent time rotating the brush with my left hand and firmly opening and closing the pliers to squeeze the base as I rotated it inside the pliers.    As I turned the brush I could hear cracking sometimes as I was closing the pliers to put pressure on the base and was afraid I was breaking something.  However, it appears to have only been the sound of the base separating itself from being glued to the ferrel.

I concentrated the squeezing to only the portion highlighted between the lines on the photo below as I figured the base would be more flexible than the ferrel to allow for the pressure to work against the glue job.  Because I used the towel and did not apply a lot of pressure at any point, there is neither scratches nor cracks in either the base or ferrel.

[Image: S5bo42Q.jpg]

As you can see from the below pics, there was a tiny portion of blue from the base left on the ferrel and a very minor bit of damage(looks worse than it is) on the base where the glue pulled off some of the material.  

Overall I am ecstatic with my progress and hope to have the success on future brushes as I try to create some Frankenbrushes in colors not manufactured in the ER100/150/250/400 styles like my OP.

[Image: dLA6jwU.jpg]
[Image: JSKR65S.jpg]

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 02-22-2018, 02:51 PM
#8
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Clint, I'm looking forward to seeing your finished product (s). Working on these old treasures is very fulfilling. Especially when they turn out just as you plan. Nice work!

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