01-26-2017, 12:47 AM
#1
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Hello guys,

I have a secret for you.
I'm not only into shaving gear and fragrances and male grooming.

I'm also into cooking.
Not crazy cooking like my older brother and late mother, but I know a thing or three since I have learned from the best since I was a child (my mother is the best cook I have seen/known in my life)

I need to start making my own pizza in a cast iron pan now.
I already make my own bread in either my Staub round cast iron cocotte or my Le Creuset oval cast iron cocotte, and let's just say I never buy my bread any longer. I bake it myself. And it's better than ever before using a cast iron cocotte/Dutch oven.

Now I want to make my own pizza.
I'm thinking of buying the 30 cm/12" Le Creuset cast iron pan, but would like to hear your recommendations regarding this.

Do you need to season the Le Creuset pan prior to using it ?
I also plan to use it as a sauter pan for vegetables by the way.

What other brand do you recommend ?
My budget limit is $200

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 01-26-2017, 04:10 AM
#2
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Have you looked into carbon steel pans?  Ongoing thread here about their superiority to cast iron:

http://shavenook.com/showthread.php?tid=...#pid772008

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 01-26-2017, 04:24 AM
#3
  • NJDJ
  • Member
  • New Jersey
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Save yourself a ton of money and get a Lodge for the skillet.   Basic, but it functions wonderfully well.  It's one of my very best pans.

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 01-26-2017, 07:44 AM
#4
  • garyg
  • Active Member
  • Great Lakes
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I'd not buy a pan just for pizza, but rather invest much less than a Le Creuset costs in a baking stone, which you can use for both pizza and baking in general.

If you have to have cast iron, I'd try and find a large enough vintage pan and restore it.    The modern stuff, while serviceable, is nowhere near the vintage quality.   But, I have no idea what is available in Europe.

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 01-26-2017, 09:22 AM
#5
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If it must be for pizza I wouldn't buy a CI pan just for that. Instead I'd find someone who can sell you a clean piece of new 1/4 - 3/8" thick mild steel plate. Allow it to heat soak in the oven for a time, then cook directly on the steel. Be sure to season it first to keep rust at bay.

The carbon steel pan idea is also a good one if you're wanting a pan.

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 01-26-2017, 09:48 AM
#6
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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He may be trying to make a specific type of pizza.
When I was young, my best friend's mother was full blown Italian. She made what she called pizza pie. Thick, deep dish pizza. Fantastic stuff. Made in a cast iron skillet.
Lodge would be my recommendation as well, fwiw.
My cast iron skillet is at least 100 years old. Passed down from my wife's great grandmother, to her mother(married at 15 and now 91), then to her. The phrase "cold dead hands" describes my feeling regarding ever letting it go.
Another idea would be to look at flea markets for old cast iron. They can be returned to service with a bit of work.
When you buy, the thickness of the casting of the pan and the bottom isn't the only measure of a good skillet. Look at the thickness where the handle attaches to the skillet. The good ones will be good and thick there. Not just the handle, but where it joins the rest of the skillet, and the wall of the pan at that point. The cheap junky ones will be thin, and will crack under heat and use.

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 01-26-2017, 12:23 PM
#7
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(01-26-2017, 12:47 AM)CHSeifert Wrote: Hello guys,

I have a secret for you.
I'm not only into shaving gear and fragrances and male grooming.

I'm also into cooking.
Not crazy cooking like my older brother and late mother, but I know a thing or three since I have learned from the best since I was a child (my mother is the best cook I have seen/known in my life)

I need to start making my own pizza in a cast iron pan now.
I already make my own bread in either my Staub round cast iron cocotte or my Le Creuset oval cast iron cocotte, and let's just say I never buy my bread any longer. I bake it myself. And it's better than ever before using a cast iron cocotte/Dutch oven.

Now I want to make my own pizza.
I'm thinking of buying the 30 cm/12" Le Creuset cast iron pan, but would like to hear your recommendations regarding this.

Do you need to season the Le Creuset pan prior to using it ?
I also plan to use it as a sauter pan for vegetables by the way.

What other brand do you recommend ?
My budget limit is $200
Staub is my go to. I just prefer the colors and performance of the lid on the dutch ovens. Both Staub and Le Creset are enameled and do not need seasoning. The white interior of the Le Creset often becomes discolored; Staub is black and does not suffer this.

If you don't want enameled, lodge is the go to and inexpensive. There are other refined cast irons out there now but Lodge will carry the day.

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 01-26-2017, 02:12 PM
#8
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CHS', have you checked the Matfer catalog? It's my go to source. But the real source is in the EU.

I did NOT look for their cast iron pans. I'd google it for your native language.

http://www.matferbourgeat.com/en/

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 01-26-2017, 02:30 PM
#9
  • doc47
  • Active Member
  • Northern Arizona
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I have a baking stone that works great for pizza, it gets the bottom nice and crisp. I make the pizza on the counter and use my pizza peel to set it on the stone. If you are a baker like me, you need a stone for your oven.

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 01-26-2017, 02:36 PM
#10
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+1 on baking stones for pizza and other good stuff.

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 01-26-2017, 11:21 PM
#11
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Yes, stones work, but the steel plate works even better. I started with the stone. Due to the heat retention and conduction of steel, cooking temps might need to be adjusted, but pizza making is an art and that's just part of what it takes. There are many ways to make a pizza.

There is an outfit that sells a silvery plated steel plate for $80 with shipping tacked on. But that level of pretty isn't required.

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 01-27-2017, 12:45 AM
#12
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Thanks for the tips, guys

My plan is to also use the CI pan as a sauter pan for vegetables and also for omelette

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 01-27-2017, 05:37 AM
#13
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Then I would definitely look into a carbon steel pan. Having used CI for decades and having pretty much totally moved to carbon steel, that should tell you something. The only other pans I use are stainless steel when the seasoning on the CS pans would be harmed. It's not difficult to reseason a pan, but it's a PITA during a busy life.

BTW, it took me forever to get me to even try a CS pan. I read glowing reports from others for maybe a year or so before Americas Test Kitchen did their testing of them. That was my impetus. I bought a 9" crepe pan because the pan I wanted was sold out. Finally it came in and I then bought an even larger pan. There is a weight savings in the smaller sizes, but in the larger sizes the weight of CS and CI are fairly close (13" and larger). Carbon steel just does everything better. It's lighter, it heats faster, and conducts heat better. I have the Matfer Boug' pans. Not the prettiest pans, but much lower priced than many of the other pretty pans (they won't stay pretty for long anyway). Too, the 11 7/8" Matfer pan won in the ATK testing. That was the only size that was tested. But all of the pans I have are very good. The really big one is difficult to season due to it's size, but I season it outdoors on a honkin' big burner to make it easier to do. Inth epast I followed Matfers seasoning instructions, and they are foolproof. Today I just heat up the pans to smoking and wipe with a very light coating of flax oil on a paper towel (very light!). It will be seen to turn brown as it polymerizes and that's exactly what you want to happen, it'll also smoke quite a bit, so you want to do this under an exhaust fan or outside. I allow the pan to cool a bit then repeat. Why flax oil? It produces a very long lasting (hard and tough) coating of seasoning.

Gotta run now though.

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 01-27-2017, 08:12 AM
#14
  • doc47
  • Active Member
  • Northern Arizona
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Brian, you convinced me, just bought a Matfer Bourgeat 062005 11-7/8" Round Frying Pan - Cook's Illustrated #1 Fry Pan

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 01-27-2017, 09:09 AM
#15
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I need my pan to be able to handle 250 degrees celcius in the oven.
Can carbon steel pans handle that level of heat ?

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 01-27-2017, 12:49 PM
#16
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Absolutely. But if you decide on one with a silicone or polymer handle cover maybe not. The Matfer pans definitely will since they're all steel. The manufacturer will tell you what their handles are good for if not all steel. That's one of the things commonly done with these pans... oven use in restaurants, and those ovens are cranked all the way up.

That's the one Doc. It's out on my range top pretty much all the time. The only time it's put away is when another pan is out. Initially follow the seasoning directions with the pan. You will definitely see the seasoning develop on the pan, there will be no question about if it's there or not. Expect quite a bit of smoke. After that 1st seasoning you'll know what it looks like and can use the oil on a paper towel, but an exceedingly thin coating gets it done. That's only if the seasoning gets stripped, otherwise it's just wipe it out to clean it. Water and a paper towel can be used. If you have any problems with it get back to me.

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 01-29-2017, 03:49 AM
#17
  • djtak
  • Member
  • Beaucaire,Gard,France
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I've got a 12" Staub frying pan and it's wonderful.

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 02-03-2017, 09:06 AM
#18
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Lodge actually makes a pizza pan.  I have lodge goods and absolutely love them.  Non enameled is they way I went.  Sanded down and then refinished made them super smooth.

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 02-03-2017, 10:37 AM
#19
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Buy an old pan at a flea market or garage sale.  The new ones arent as good as the old ones.  If you dont want to do that, get a Lodge but make sure its a cast iron one.  Nowdays, they sell a lot of cast aluminum ones.
With any cast iron pan, even a new one, you will need to season it.

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 02-21-2017, 02:05 PM
#20
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(02-03-2017, 10:37 AM)Badgerstate Wrote: Buy an old pan at a flea market or garage sale.  The new ones arent as good as the old ones.  If you dont want to do that, get a Lodge but make sure its a cast iron one.  Nowdays, they sell a lot of cast aluminum ones.
With any cast iron pan, even a new one, you will need to season it.

Lodge used to sandblast their products to smooth them down.  I heard they haven't done that in a while and the new products are quite bumpy.  The new lodge stuff I use I take a hard hand with a metal spatula to and don't season it.  That smoothens out a lot of the bumps.  I then re season it.  The other method you can do is sand the new pan down with something for metal.  I've seen that done to make a mirror smooth finish.

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