02-25-2017, 06:18 AM
#1
  • Nero
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  • le montagne
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Do you change the heat or duration of your badger brush pre-soak depending on the knot (hair type, density, etc), or do you just do all the same?

It dawned on me the other day that maybe people who like "dense manchurian types (like shavemac D01) and/or low lofts (less than 2:1)" knot might soak longer than those who don't. Some people soak for a minute or less while others soak their brushes while in the shower. You, please?

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 02-25-2017, 06:21 AM
#2
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I soak all my badger (shavemac D01, Manchurian, Finest etc) brushes the same, in warmish to hot tap water while I shower. In winter I use a scuttle (G12) which keeps the brush and lather toasty warm through the duration of the shave.
Hope that helps.

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 02-25-2017, 06:42 AM
#3
  • eengler
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  • South Dakota, USA
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I soak all my badgers in hot water for the duration of my shower. I just like a warm brushSmile

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 02-25-2017, 08:13 AM
#4
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(02-25-2017, 06:42 AM)eengler Wrote: I soak all my badgers in hot water for the duration of my shower. I just like a warm brushSmile

Signs011

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 02-25-2017, 08:17 AM
#5
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I love me a warm brush as well, but the instructions I got from Peter Wolf said to never use hot water.  Thoughts?

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 02-25-2017, 08:26 AM
#6
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I never soak my brushes. I just run them under warm tap water for 5-10 seconds, shake out the excess water, then start face-lathering.

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 02-25-2017, 08:39 AM
#7
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I started traditional shaving with a Semogue boar that required soaking, and carried the practice over when I switched to badger brushes. Eventually, I realized that my badgers performed the same with or without soaking. I don't soak them anymore. I can see doing it for heat, for those that like that effect.

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 02-25-2017, 08:48 AM
#8
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(02-25-2017, 08:39 AM)shevek Wrote: I started traditional shaving with a Semogue boar that required soaking, and carried the practice over when I switched to badger brushes. Eventually, I realized that my badgers performed the same with or without soaking. I don't soak them anymore. I can see doing it for heat, for those that like that effect.

^^ This is my story as well.

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 02-25-2017, 08:55 AM
#9
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(02-25-2017, 08:26 AM)celestino Wrote: I never soak my brushes. I just run them under warm tap water for 5-10 seconds, shake out the excess water, then start face-lathering.


This, although if a brush hasn't been used for a while, I'll further swish the knot around in the water in the sink for an additional 10 seconds, or so.

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 02-25-2017, 08:59 AM
#10
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I soak my badger brushes while a shower. However, I only submerge the hair about halfway while soaking (I don't soak the base of the hair).

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 02-25-2017, 09:06 AM
#11
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I heat up a mug of distilled water (17 grains where I live!) before I shower, then soak for just a few seconds after I shower. I tried soaking for the duration of the shower, but didnt see any reason to soak for so long. The exception being Simpson Chubby 3, which I did notice it being softer if I soak it longer. I still just soak for a few seconds though.

As a follow up, after I rinse all the lather out, I squeeze the remaining water out and lightly brush on a clean towel, then soak again in the distilled water. I don't know if it helps, but it makes me feel easy with the thought that it helps rinse the hard water out of my brush. Water that hard can't be good for the badger hair.

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 02-25-2017, 09:18 AM
#12
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(02-25-2017, 06:42 AM)eengler Wrote: I soak all my badgers in hot water for the duration of my shower. I just like a warm brushSmile


So do I.

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 02-25-2017, 09:18 AM
#13
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I always soak my badger brushes while i take a shower


Enviado desde mi iPhone utilizando Tapatalk Pro

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 02-25-2017, 09:22 AM
#14
  • eengler
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(02-25-2017, 08:17 AM)22bulldog Wrote: I love me a warm brush as well, but the instructions I got from Peter Wolf said to never use hot water.  Thoughts?

My tap water runs out at 115 degrees. I've never damaged a brush to my knowledge. I'm not sure of the actual threshold temperature that would do harm.

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 02-25-2017, 10:21 AM
#15
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just a minute under hot running water will do for me!

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 02-25-2017, 10:27 AM
#16
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(02-25-2017, 08:17 AM)22bulldog Wrote: I love me a warm brush as well, but the instructions I got from Peter Wolf said to never use hot water.  Thoughts?


One way to ruin a brush is soaking it in hot water. Over time the heat affects the glue/epoxy resulting brush bristles to shed.
Warm water is fine.

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 02-25-2017, 11:27 AM
#17
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(02-25-2017, 06:42 AM)eengler Wrote: I soak all my badgers in hot water for the duration of my shower. I just like a warm brushSmile

Signs011

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 02-25-2017, 11:34 AM
#18
  • Nero
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  • le montagne
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I should have stated in the OP what are my own current practices...

I do not currently do different soaking techniques for different brushes. That is, for all my badgers, I soak in a cup of hot water for about a minute (probably a little less).

There is one exception to this:
my Art of Shaving large silvertip brush (a discontinued one, in fact I believe it was somewhat NOS when I got it, albeit at a store). I soak this AOS brush maybe 30 seconds or less (so half the time of my normal), because the brush has very delicate hairs and therefore soaking it too long (especially in too hot of water) can tend to take all the backbone out of the knot.

All else equal, it is already by far my softest tipped brush (even more so than my Thäter brushes in Fan, even though this AoS brush is Bulb). It has a high loft:diameter ratio and somewhat thin hair diameter and satin silk tips when wet, almost airy when dry. These are the reasons I don't want to soak it too long or too hot: it doesn't need it (because it feels so soft already), and I don't want to kill its backbone (which would happen if soaking was too intense, due to its knot/hair characteristics).

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 02-25-2017, 12:06 PM
#19
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Rule of thumb for me, if water is too hot for my hand it is too hot for the natural bristles.
I soak boars, not badgers.
Badgers get a swirling bath in the scuttle for maybe 10 seconds.

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 02-25-2017, 04:59 PM
#20
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I usually use a badger.  Whichever one I use, it gets a soak for a few minutes while I brush my teeth and wash my face. Heck, I even soak my synthetic out of habit.

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