03-15-2017, 12:42 PM
#1
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Hi Wet Shavers... The shop that cuts my hair is owned by a friend of the family. She has 3 kids. 1 of them, a sophomore or junior in college in PA, is considering going to barber school. I know I can look on line for information, and will do so. However, I'd also like to ask advice from you guys as well. I feel that there is probably a ton of good knowledge and advice throughout the membership of this great forum.

What can I tell this kid and his mom? Are there any national schools or programs to look at or stay away from? Has anyone attended or participated in a program? Any info would be much appreciated.
thanks!!

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 06-06-2017, 02:21 AM
#2
  • Quando
  • Senior Member
  • Somewhere far-away, from Home
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Yeah, okay.  I would recommend doing something else, entirely, with his life.  The best thing he can do is stay in college, and, get a good job.   He should study economics.  This is, objectively, the best major to study.  Not everyone can, however.  So, he may need to study finance, as a major, or business management.  

These are the tiers ME>MF=MBA>BS = BA Econ>BS = BA Finance >BS = BA Business (becomes equal to Finance, if Pre-Law is added).  

So, yeah, so it depends on how smart he is.  He is smart enough to get into an actual college, so, he should stay there.  

tl;dr 
He should stay in college, and, complete university, because "barber" is inferior to "hair stylist," which is what his mother is, so, it would be a step down.

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 06-06-2017, 02:23 AM
#3
  • Quando
  • Senior Member
  • Somewhere far-away, from Home
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He should be Business/Pre-Law, and, then, get a JD, and, a sweet job in corporate law.

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 06-06-2017, 02:45 AM
#4
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I would disagree with Quando... as long as his profession of choice pays a decent wage, he ought to aim for a career that he'll enjoy. For society to work we can't all be lawyers (thankfully), just as we can't all be barbers - as the Norwegian saying goes: "We can't all make a living from cutting each others hair" - it takes all kinds of people doing all sorts of jobs; from midwife to miner, from farmer to funeral agent, from factory worker to CEO. We're all just part of the big machine that is modern society, and if people avoided some jobs because of a perceived "lower status" then society would grind to a halt pretty damn quick.

If the boy wants to try his hand at being a barber, he should not be forced to slug through an education to be become a mediocre economist. If he's made to educate himself for a job he don't want, he'll do it poorly. If he does it poorly, he's likely to be fired. If he's fired, who's gonna pay the bills and his student loan? There is allready enough people with degrees flipping burgers for minimum wage in the world...

The other thing to keep in mind is that we change as we grow and mature. I was one of a few in my class in High School who KNEW what I wanted to do in my life, and took my further education based on that premise... and yet here I am, twenty five years later, doing something that's only tangiable related at best - yet I'm having a blast doing it. So it pays, in my opinion, not to tie oneself down to a single option as far as work goes... even more so if a student loan is invoved (I avoided that, thanks to the Royal Norwegian Air Force).

TL : DR? Pick a job based on your interest as long as it pays the bill, and don't take advice from strangers on the internet too seriously Wink

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 06-06-2017, 06:58 AM
#5
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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(06-06-2017, 02:45 AM)WegianWarrior Wrote: I would disagree with Quando... as long as his profession of choice pays a decent wage, he ought to aim for a career that he'll enjoy. For society to work we can't all be lawyers (thankfully), just as we can't all be barbers - as the Norwegian saying goes: "We can't all make a living from cutting each others hair" - it takes all kinds of people doing all sorts of jobs; from midwife to miner, from farmer to funeral agent, from factory worker to CEO. We're all just part of the big machine that is modern society, and if people avoided some jobs because of a perceived "lower status" then society would grind to a halt pretty damn quick.

If the boy wants to try his hand at being a barber, he should not be forced to slug through an education to be become a mediocre economist. If he's made to educate himself for a job he don't want, he'll do it poorly. If he does it poorly, he's likely to be fired. If he's fired, who's gonna pay the bills and his student loan? There is allready enough people with degrees flipping burgers for minimum wage in the world...

The other thing to keep in mind is that we change as we grow and mature. I was one of a few in my class in High School who KNEW what I wanted to do in my life, and took my further education based on that premise... and yet here I am, twenty five years later, doing something that's only tangiable related at best - yet I'm having a blast doing it. So it pays, in my opinion, not to tie oneself down to a single option as far as work goes... even more so if a student loan is invoved (I avoided that, thanks to the Royal Norwegian Air Force).

TL : DR? Pick a job based on your interest as long as it pays the bill, and don't take advice from strangers on the internet too seriously Wink

Well stated.

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 06-06-2017, 07:51 AM
#6
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I agree with Hans.

Small experience I thought of sharing.

I have a handlebar moustache which every once in a while needs proper trimming and shaping up. Many middle aged barbers end my screwing the shape and I have to raze the entire moustache and then start regrowing it from the start. But there is one particular boy (early 20's) in one of the salons I visit who does the job right, every time. I carry my own stuff from home for shaving and he keeps on asking about my brushes, blades, pre shave oils etc etc.

I respect his talent a lot and generally go in for other services suggested by him. We need many more passionate people like this young boy above and the one mentioned by the OP.

Let the boy follow his calling. You may Google for good institutions who specialize in such type of courses. In India, many state governments have outsourced this to third parties who will train, coach such young boys and ready them for a job placement. Perhaps it might be a case in your country too.

Tbh Had I acquired this passion for wet shaving 2 decades back, I might have very well opened a Salon and employed such young and budding talent and perhaps fund them a little to start their own thing.

End goal is to stay happy and content..️.




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 06-06-2017, 11:26 AM
#7
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Learning a trade has slowed over decades, with expectations of a degree (or degrees) set at an early age in kids' lives.  Meanwhile, many trades (barber, welder, pipefitter, etc.) have suffered or have compromised business models to compensate for low-skilled work forces.  I like the work that Mike Rowe is doing (the "Dirty Jobs" guy and Ford spokesperson, among many other things) to raise awareness on this and encourage young people to learn a trade.  Good for your friend and their interest in pursuing a passion and not just an expected career path.

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 06-06-2017, 05:21 PM
#8
  • Quando
  • Senior Member
  • Somewhere far-away, from Home
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(06-06-2017, 02:45 AM)WegianWarrior Wrote: I would disagree with Quando... as long as his profession of choice pays a decent wage, he ought to aim for a career that he'll enjoy. For society to work we can't all be lawyers (thankfully), just as we can't all be barbers - as the Norwegian saying goes: "We can't all make a living from cutting each others hair" - it takes all kinds of people doing all sorts of jobs; from midwife to miner, from farmer to funeral agent, from factory worker to CEO. We're all just part of the big machine that is modern society, and if people avoided some jobs because of a perceived "lower status" then society would grind to a halt pretty damn quick.

If the boy wants to try his hand at being a barber, he should not be forced to slug through an education to be become a mediocre economist. If he's made to educate himself for a job he don't want, he'll do it poorly. If he does it poorly, he's likely to be fired. If he's fired, who's gonna pay the bills and his student loan? There is allready enough people with degrees flipping burgers for minimum wage in the world...

The other thing to keep in mind is that we change as we grow and mature. I was one of a few in my class in High School who KNEW what I wanted to do in my life, and took my further education based on that premise... and yet here I am, twenty five years later, doing something that's only tangiable related at best - yet I'm having a blast doing it. So it pays, in my opinion, not to tie oneself down to a single option as far as work goes... even more so if a student loan is invoved (I avoided that, thanks to the Royal Norwegian Air Force).

TL : DR? Pick a job based on your interest as long as it pays the bill, and don't take advice from strangers on the internet too seriously Wink
Dropping out of a real college to attend barber college would seriously limit his career choices, and, I think he would regret it, once the hipster fad wears off.

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 06-06-2017, 06:52 PM
#9
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The issue is not subject to a simple answer.  Today, college does not automatically represent a good investment for everyone.  Graduates with degrees in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) generally do well.  However, many college majors no longer translate into a meaningful, well paying job.  As a result, college graduates end up unemployed and underemployed.  At the same time, there is a shortage of skilled workers.  We need a new emphasis on post high school vocational programs.  Young persons who have vocational training in the right fields, such as machinists, welders and plumbers, can make more than many college graduates and enjoy what they do.  Thus, the best answer to what this young man should do depends on factors such as his personality, interests and aptitude.

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 06-06-2017, 07:01 PM
#10
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Nice post, Ricardo.


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 06-09-2017, 02:49 AM
#11
  • Johnny
  • MODERATOR EMERITUS
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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Follow your dream, not someone else's.  What ever profession one choses, just be the best you can be.  Happiness, health, and friendships are a whole lot more important than wealth.

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