03-21-2017, 02:27 AM
#1
User Info
In the parade of crackpots, I present to you the patent "Magnetic razor conditioning and device therefor", being a "simple and effective means for producing or maintaining a good magnetic influence" from 1927 by John S Forber.


Ooookay. The OCR on the google patent is pretty bad, but I'm assuming it's the same crank idea that placing your razor blade in a magnatic field will magically either sharpen it or keep it from getting dull.

[Image: US1775518-0.png]

It is kind of funny how Mr Forber made sure to explain in his patent that a razor is made up of:


Quote:...a pronged guard 18, a curved clamp head 14, and a handle 15 adjustably connected to the head 14.

I almost wondr if Mr Forber believed that his device worked best for Open Comb razors... which makes sence if you know a little about magnetic fields, but not enough to grasp that magnets don't sharpen blades.

The notches on either side of the main magnets seems to be intended to either 'demaginitise' the blade, or allow the blade to rest in closer contact with the magnet, or possible both. As mentioned the patent obviously didn't OCR well, and the parts of the description I can make out is - as often is the case - verbose yet confusing.

3 4,511
Reply
 03-21-2017, 03:22 AM
#2
  • eengler
  • Administrator
  • South Dakota, USA
User Info
"Magnetic Influence"  sounds good anywaySmile

59 4,503
Reply
 03-21-2017, 03:52 AM
#3
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
User Info
It's the same thing as all these people that think wearing copper around their wrist is a miracle cure for arthritis. Gimmick/ad copy.
MHO.

2 1,683
Reply
 03-21-2017, 04:30 AM
#4
User Info
Similar things are still available, claiming to rise the microscopic edge again.
They claim some study made at University of Erlangen / Nürnberg for a proof of efficiency.
Maybe I'll look for that study Smile[Image: 0f57cf5998b974480535c52e42775e45.jpg]


Gesendet von iPad mit Tapatalk

0 84
Reply
 03-21-2017, 04:57 AM
#5
User Info
I didn't know razors were subject to the placebo effect, but then all that it needs to do is convince the user.

32 6,460
Reply
 03-21-2017, 07:55 AM
#6
User Info
(03-21-2017, 04:57 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: I didn't know razors were subject to the placebo effect, but then all that it needs to do is convince the user.
There's a rather long history of identical razor blades being marketed under different names, distinguished in fact only by their packaging, with people swearing a preference for one or another.

Moderator Note:  Link to webite not affiliated with TSN deleted.

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk

1 220
Reply
 03-21-2017, 10:14 AM
#7
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
User Info
(03-21-2017, 07:55 AM)jmudrick Wrote:
(03-21-2017, 04:57 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: I didn't know razors were subject to the placebo effect, but then all that it needs to do is convince the user.
There's a rather long history of identical razor blades being marketed under different names, distinguished in fact only by their packaging, with people swearing a preference for one or another.

That decision appears to be the final disposition of a run of the mill infringement action.  

However, I'll  give you a pass on not getting the case summary quite right, because the cited case was argued to the Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit by Charles Evan Hughes.  

Charles Evans Hughes, Sr. (April 11, 1862 – August 27, 1948) was an American statesman, lawyer, and Republican politician from New York.  He served as the 36th Governor of New York (1907–1910), Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1910–1916), United States Secretary of State (1921–1925), a judge on the Court of International Justice (1928–1930), and the 11th Chief Justice of the United States (1930–1941).  He was the Republican nominee in the 1916 U.S. Presidential election, losing narrowly to incumbent President Woodrow Wilson.

1 1,089
Reply
 03-21-2017, 10:17 AM
#8
User Info
(03-21-2017, 10:14 AM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(03-21-2017, 07:55 AM)jmudrick Wrote:
(03-21-2017, 04:57 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: I didn't know razors were subject to the placebo effect, but then all that it needs to do is convince the user.
There's a rather long history of identical razor blades being marketed under different names, distinguished in fact only by their packaging, with people swearing a preference for one or another.

I'll  give you a pass on not getting the case summary quite right,..Bla bla...  
(?) I don't recall summarizing the case.

Perhaps you didn't bother  a to read it...I posted it because precisely on point the judge threw out the case noting the plaintiff ASR had dirty hands in selling the same blades under different names, marketing each one as the most superior.

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk

1 220
Reply
 03-21-2017, 03:31 PM
#9
User Info
You gentlemen do know that if you shave with a magnetized blade; over time you will acquire the highly sought after "magnetic personality".

0 189
Reply
 03-22-2017, 02:30 AM
#10
User Info
I would not easily dismiss an idea for looking odd, some do work Smile

Otoh, I could not imagine household magnets to re - erect a blade's edge.

The blademaster's producer Kemmelmeier uses rem microscopic pics from Erlangen university (my university, btw) to prove the effect of his device.
Well, pics were made at university of E., differences could be seen easily.
But:
Are the chosen areas of the blades representative for the whole blade?
Btw, two blades were supplied by Mr. K.
Ahem... he could have sent them anything.

German mag "Stiftung Warentest" did a double blinded test with treated and untreated blades sent to test persons, no significant differences.

Making all this look like a complete hoax? Yes.

But there still are in fora several users happy with it (others not so).
Some claim that there cannot be an effect with blades made of non magnetic steel, but with noticable effect on more magnetic blades.

The blademaster and similar product razormate contain two less than powerful magnets, poles as far as I know on the top.
You could easily do your own experiment with two very strong, flat magnets.
You could use them afterwards in your toolbox, on your fridge or for whatever Smile

I lack the time for this kind of homework and (still highly probable) nonsense, but would like to see a high power magnet experiment with more ferrous (clinging to magnets) blades.

A working device certainly could help cartridge users save some money.

Someone else willing to try some nonsense?



Gesendet von iPad mit Tapatalk

0 84
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)