03-21-2017, 09:15 AM
#1
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My dream setup
18 cm, 20 cm, 24 cm cook/stew pot Mauviel 250b
30 cm & 26 cm frying pan Mauviel 250b
28 cm frying pan Demeyere Pawson
30 cm Le Creuset ECI frying pan oven safe
24 cm sauter pan Mauviel 250b
26 cm Staub ECI grill pan oven safe
26 cm Scanpan non-stick sauter pan oven safe
18 cm & 20 cm conical saucier Mauviel 250b
30 cm Le Creuset ECI pot and 26 cm Staub ECI pot
32 cm Le Creuset ECI Frying pot
28 cm Staub ECI Sauter pot

My current beginner setup:
18 cm, 20 cm, 24 cm cook/stew pot Eva Trio Stainless Steel
30 cm, 28 cm & 26 cm frying pan Mauviel M Cook SS
30 cm Le Creuset ECI frying pan oven safe
24 cm sauter pan Mauviel M Cook SS
26 cm Staub ECI grill pan oven safe
26 cm Scanpan non-stick sauter pan oven safe
18 cm & 20 cm conical saucier Mauviel M Cook SS
30 cm Le Creuset ECI pot and 26 cm Staub ECI pot
32 cm Le Creuset ECI Frying pot
28 cm Staub ECI Sauter pot

Let me hear about your setup !!

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 03-21-2017, 08:41 PM
#2
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It's not so much gear, it's technique. But gear does help. Certain techniques just can't be done without it.

For frying/sauteing I have a 12" SS 3ply pan with lid (i'd need to check brand... it works fine), a 9" matfer CS pan, 12" matfer CS pan, and a 14" matfer CS pan. I also have a few other 3 ply SS stock pots of various sizes up to 5 gallons.  No big deal on manufacturer, they work for me and they don't burn the thickest of sauces if I do my part in even a token way. I also use flat steel plates for doing certain things... straight out of the steel supplier I use to supply my steel for welding fabrication.

But I also do Sous Vide and gear for it (other than the Sous Vide circulator) is even less critical. I use a butane torch to finish the SV meat off.

Then for the Southern BBQ that I make I use a Primo Kamado for that. But it's also my grill and outdoor "brick" oven, and pizza oven.

I'm pretty sure I already covered my Blue Star indoor oven in another post so I won't repeat that. Same with the Ankarsrum Assistent (with various attachments). For a blender, well I don't have one. But I do have a Vita-Mix Food Prep3 which is actually a hammermill grinder in drag and on steroids. It's the only "blender" that does what I want and survives the tasks. I've had home owner Vita-Mix units and they work, but the Food Prep3 is by far the best I've ever owned/used.

Converting my kitchen from electric to gas (propane for us) was a huge step forward and I'd never willingly go back to electric.

Cooking is just refining what you have based on what you want to do.  It builds on itself same as any other craft. One starts in one place and then realizes that you really need "this" to get to where you want to be. Over the decades I have arrived at where I want to be so there is no dream kitchen for me anymore. There are things that I would never be without and the intervening decades have proven them out. My kitchen is a working kitchen, not at all for show, and I'm where I want to be. When people say that "I want X, but I want Brian to cook it.", it gives a certain satisfaction. Or when folks talk about a dish they had a decade before with idetic memory of it, or one can turn a vegan into a meat eater, it gives a certain satisfaction of something done right. It's not so much about pots and pans themselves but the person wielding them.

Same as my cutlery... nothing fancy or for show, just utilitarian solid value stuff (mostly Swiss Victorinox) that takes and holds an edge. BTW, I recently converted all of it to the Japanese 15° angle. That edge just works better.

I get rave reviews of my dishes and that's my goal. For me it's not so much the kitchen itself or the journey, but the resulting dish. Everything else is just how I arrived there and I'm just a cook not a chef.

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 03-21-2017, 10:40 PM
#3
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(03-21-2017, 08:41 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: It's not so much gear, it's technique. But gear does help. Certain techniques just can't be done without it.

For frying/sauteing I have a 12" SS 3ply pan with lid (i'd need to check brand... it works fine), a 9" matfer CS pan, 12" matfer CS pan, and a 14" matfer CS pan. I also have a few other 3 ply SS stock pots of various sizes up to 5 gallons.  No big deal on manufacturer, they work for me and they don't burn the thickest of sauces if I do my part in even a token way. I also use flat steel plates for doing certain things... straight out of the steel supplier I use to supply my steel for welding fabrication.

But I also do Sous Vide and gear for it (other than the Sous Vide circulator) is even less critical. I use a butane torch to finish the SV meat off.

Then for the Southern BBQ that I make I use a Primo Kamado for that. But it's also my grill and outdoor "brick" oven, and pizza oven.

I'm pretty sure I already covered my Blue Star indoor oven in another post so I won't repeat that. Same with the Ankarsrum Assistent (with various attachments). For a blender, well I don't have one. But I do have a Vita-Mix Food Prep3 which is actually a hammermill grinder in drag and on steroids. It's the only "blender" that does what I want and survives the tasks. I've had home owner Vita-Mix units and they work, but the Food Prep3 is by far the best I've ever owned/used.

Converting my kitchen from electric to gas (propane for us) was a huge step forward and I'd never willingly go back to electric.

Cooking is just refining what you have based on what you want to do.  It builds on itself same as any other craft. One starts in one place and then realizes that you really need "this" to get to where you want to be. Over the decades I have arrived at where I want to be so there is no dream kitchen for me anymore. There are things that I would never be without and the intervening decades have proven them out. My kitchen is a working kitchen, not at all for show, and I'm where I want to be. When people say that "I want X, but I want Brian to cook it.", it gives a certain satisfaction. Or when folks talk about a dish they had a decade before with idetic memory of it, or one can turn a vegan into a meat eater, it gives a certain satisfaction of something done right. It's not so much about pots and pans themselves but the person wielding them.

Same as my cutlery... nothing fancy or for show, just utilitarian solid value stuff (mostly Swiss Victorinox) that takes and holds an edge. BTW, I recently converted all of it to the Japanese 15° angle. That edge just works better.

I get rave reviews of my dishes and that's my goal. For me it's not so much the kitchen itself or the journey, but the resulting dish. Everything else is just how I arrived there and I'm just a cook not a chef.

I respect that.

All can get great shaves using the one and same razor, brush and soap, day in day out.

Some of us like to own multiple razors, brushes and soaps. They all do the same. Give us a great shave.

But variation is the spice of life.

For instance roasting a tenderloin beef in my grill pan gives me one way of cooking it, using a cast iron regular ECI pan another way and a stainless steel pan a third way, all different tastes, but all great ways to achieve the same goal.

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 03-22-2017, 06:48 AM
#4
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Yup, we all come to various endeavors in different ways and using our own eyes. Just another way to say YMMV.

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 03-22-2017, 08:43 AM
#5
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(03-21-2017, 08:41 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Same as my cutlery... nothing fancy or for show, just utilitarian solid value stuff (mostly Swiss Victorinox) that takes and holds an edge. BTW, I recently converted all of it to the Japanese 15° angle. That edge just works better.

I get rave reviews of my dishes and that's my goal. For me it's not so much the kitchen itself or the journey, but the resulting dish. Everything else is just how I arrived there and I'm just a cook not a chef.

Brian, I don't want to take Claus' post off topic, but I wanted to make a remark about Victorinox knives.  Like you, I'm a serious cook and get rave reviews for my cooking.  I do virtually all the cooking in my family.  I enjoy quality chef's knives, and I find 8" to be the optimal size for most tasks.  I have an nice assortment of German and Japanese chef's knives.  However, the knife that get the most daily use in my kitchen is the 8" Victorinox Fibrox.  It's stamped and not forged, but holds an edge well, and is remarkably easy to maintain with a steel or sharpen.  It's the ultimate in utilitarian practicality.

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 03-25-2017, 01:58 PM
#6
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(03-21-2017, 09:15 AM)CHSeifert Wrote: My dream setup
18 cm, 20 cm, 24 cm cook/stew pot Mauviel 250b
30 cm & 26 cm frying pan Mauviel 250b
28 cm frying pan Demeyere Pawson
30 cm Le Creuset ECI frying pan oven safe
24 cm sauter pan Mauviel 250b
26 cm Staub ECI grill pan oven safe
26 cm Scanpan non-stick sauter pan oven safe
18 cm & 20 cm conical saucier Mauviel 250b
30 cm Le Creuset ECI pot and 26 cm Staub ECI pot
32 cm Le Creuset ECI Frying pot
28 cm Staub ECI Sauter pot

My current beginner setup:
18 cm, 20 cm, 24 cm cook/stew pot Eva Trio Stainless Steel
30 cm, 28 cm & 26 cm frying pan Mauviel M Cook SS
30 cm Le Creuset ECI frying pan oven safe
24 cm sauter pan Mauviel M Cook SS
26 cm Staub ECI grill pan oven safe
26 cm Scanpan non-stick sauter pan oven safe
18 cm & 20 cm conical saucier Mauviel M Cook SS
30 cm Le Creuset ECI pot and 26 cm Staub ECI pot
32 cm Le Creuset ECI Frying pot
28 cm Staub ECI Sauter pot

Claus, if I had even your beginner set, the first thing I would do is throw half of it away.  There are two reasons for that:  
  1. We were pioneers (in the North American market, anyway) is switching to induction (1999), and so anything that goes on our cooktop must be attracted to a magnet (not a major limitation); that is a trivial matter (and, if I understand correctly, you are still using open flames, so it does not apply to you);
  2.  When I am cooking, I do not want to spend all my time cogitating over what pot or pan to use; pretty much all of our pots are more or less interchangeable, and pretty much all of our pans are interchangeable, so if the pot that — all else being equal — would be my first choice for a task is already in use, then I have several more, not identical, but adequate substitutes, ready to step up for the job.  It also means that all of my pots and pans (excepting a huge stockpot and the used twice-a-year turkey roaster) can fit inside two drawers under the cooktop; I never need to take a trip across the kitchen to grab another pot, because what I want is always right at hand.
Example of versatility:  I have a 3.2 liter Demeyere Apollo (entry level) “Mussel Pot” that is as versatile as any pot I ever have seen.  Its top, designed to hold empty mussel shells after the meat has been picked out, actually makes a near hermetic seal with the pot below, and — off the pot and sitting on the counter — its flat “bottom” makes it the perfect bowl for use in breading pork chops, dunking slices of bread for French toast, etc.  If you know what you are doing, 3.2 liters is completely adequate for cooking pasts for up to six people, no matter what the recipe says for how much water you need to prepare that quantity of pasta.  (One adds salt to the water before dropping in the pasta, then brings it just to a rolling boil, places a thin cotton dish towel over the top of the pot, places the top of the pot on top of the dish towel, and removes the pot from the heat, leaving the pot unopened for the recommended duration of the recipe’s recommended “cooking” time.  The pasta will cook completely, and the water in which it has been cooked will be perfectly clear, not cloudy.)  The 3.2 liter Demeyere Mussel pot, like all of our pots used for cooking dishes that have ample liquid, is clad on the bottom (a disk) only, because heat is distributed inside the pot by convection of the liquid, and cladding up the sides does aught but make the sides of the pot a radiator to heat the kitchen; it does nothing at all to heat the contents of the pot; ideally, pots for cooking liquids would have insulated sidewalls to retain the het inside the pot, where it does the most good.

We have a somewhat broader range of “frying pans,” broadly construed (includes woks and sauteuses), because of the wide range of quantities that one cooks at one time on the stovetop, and because some operations require getting the hand tools all the way under the contents of the pan, and other operations risk spilling the contents onto the cooktop if the pan does not have a proper sidewall.  Pride of place goes to an antique cast iron Griswold (“ERIE” cast into the underside) skillet that is irreplaceable by any currently manufactured skillet, except Nambu Tetsu from the Morioka region:  the Erie, Pennsylvania, iron itself has a slightly different chemical and crystalline composition than other irons and it simply “cooks better” than other cast iron (except Nambu Tetsu).  We have a smaller (nominally 8 inch) Michael Lax enameled cast iron frypan that Samuel Farber, the brilliant founder of Copco, commissioned Lax to design and had a Danish company known for its cast iron home heating stoves to manufacture.  And we have a use-it-like-you-hate-it Matfer Bourgeat “black steel” 10 inch frying pan that gets as much use as (and probably more abuse than) probably any other pot or pan in our inventory.  As John Cameron Swayze used to say for Timex, "it takes a lickin’ and keeps on tickin’.“  Despite the comment above we never have sprung for a dedicated wok.

Of course, we have the mandatory Kuhn-Rikon Duromatic 9.5 inch “frying pan”; I cannot imagine cooking artichokes in any other manner, and there is no better pot for cooking risotto; but the Kuhn-Rikon also serves as a back-up for the other frying pans and regular pots.  We have two other Demeyere Apollo pots (a 1.7 liter saucepan and a 3.2 liter sauteuse,) a Mauviel Induc'inox 2 liter Windsor pot, a Michael Lax Copco lidded casserole for the oven, a tall and narrow Karen di ZANI 1.8 liter saucepan (Italian), and two pieces of Nambu Tetsu, one that some call a tempura pot (there is no better vessel to bake a Dutch Baby — German pancake/soufflé) and a smaller bail-handle cooking pot of similar shape.

That does it for our metal pots (we do have ceramic baking dishes and thermal glass loaf pans).  And, you know what?  In decades of constant use, we never have felt limited by our selection in any way.

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 03-25-2017, 08:09 PM
#7
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Dear gents;

As mentioned before, i have arrived at my dream setup about five years ago. A 75 gallon fish tank. Mind you, its not an aquarium. I dont know the word in english. Its a "vivero". Is where you put and keep live lobster until it is time to cook it.

You see, one thing is frozen. Another thing is fresh. And then there is alive, caribbean spiny lobster. Access to it is limited.

Now it is only a matter of rolling up your sleeve! Lobster is one of those things with very short shelf life.

Believe me when i tell you, it makes a heck of a difference!!!

Best regards,

Pp


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 03-25-2017, 08:34 PM
#8
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Of course it makes a difference. We're getting off topic, but lobster must be kept alive before cooking and killed immediately before. In Maine they're called a lobster pound, but that's more the establishment. Where the lobsters are kept alive we just called a tank. We don't have your tropical spiney lobsters but the cold water clawed lobsters.

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 03-25-2017, 09:52 PM
#9
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(03-25-2017, 01:58 PM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(03-21-2017, 09:15 AM)CHSeifert Wrote: My dream setup
18 cm, 20 cm, 24 cm cook/stew pot Mauviel 250b
30 cm & 26 cm frying pan Mauviel 250b
28 cm frying pan Demeyere Pawson
30 cm Le Creuset ECI frying pan oven safe
24 cm sauter pan Mauviel 250b
26 cm Staub ECI grill pan oven safe
26 cm Scanpan non-stick sauter pan oven safe
18 cm & 20 cm conical saucier Mauviel 250b
30 cm Le Creuset ECI pot and 26 cm Staub ECI pot
32 cm Le Creuset ECI Frying pot
28 cm Staub ECI Sauter pot

My current beginner setup:
18 cm, 20 cm, 24 cm cook/stew pot Eva Trio Stainless Steel
30 cm, 28 cm & 26 cm frying pan Mauviel M Cook SS
30 cm Le Creuset ECI frying pan oven safe
24 cm sauter pan Mauviel M Cook SS
26 cm Staub ECI grill pan oven safe
26 cm Scanpan non-stick sauter pan oven safe
18 cm & 20 cm conical saucier Mauviel M Cook SS
30 cm Le Creuset ECI pot and 26 cm Staub ECI pot
32 cm Le Creuset ECI Frying pot
28 cm Staub ECI Sauter pot

Claus, if I had even your beginner set, the first thing I would do is throw half of it away.  There are two reasons for that:  

  1. We were pioneers (in the North American market, anyway) is switching to induction (1999), and so anything that goes on our cooktop must be attracted to a magnet (not a major limitation); that is a trivial matter (and, if I understand correctly, you are still using open flames, so it does not apply to you);
  2.  When I am cooking, I do not want to spend all my time cogitating over what pot or pan to use; pretty much all of our pots are more or less interchangeable, and pretty much all of our pans are interchangeable, so if the pot that — all else being equal — would be my first choice for a task is already in use, then I have several more, not identical, but adequate substitutes, ready to step up for the job.  It also means that all of my pots and pans (excepting a huge stockpot and the used twice-a-year turkey roaster) can fit inside two drawers under the cooktop; I never need to take a trip across the kitchen to grab another pot, because what I want is always right at hand.
Example of versatility:  I have a 3.2 liter Demeyere Apollo (entry level) “Mussel Pot” that is as versatile as any pot I ever have seen.  Its top, designed to hold empty mussel shells after the meat has been picked out, actually makes a near hermetic seal with the pot below, and — off the pot and sitting on the counter — its flat “bottom” makes it the perfect bowl for use in breading pork chops, dunking slices of bread for French toast, etc.  If you know what you are doing, 3.2 liters is completely adequate for cooking pasts for up to six people, no matter what the recipe says for how much water you need to prepare that quantity of pasta.  (One adds salt to the water before dropping in the pasta, then brings it just to a rolling boil, places a thin cotton dish towel over the top of the pot, places the top of the pot on top of the dish towel, and removes the pot from the heat, leaving the pot unopened for the recommended duration of the recipe’s recommended “cooking” time.  The pasta will cook completely, and the water in which it has been cooked will be perfectly clear, not cloudy.)  The 3.2 liter Demeyere Mussel pot, like all of our pots used for cooking dishes that have ample liquid, is clad on the bottom (a disk) only, because heat is distributed inside the pot by convection of the liquid, and cladding up the sides does aught but make the sides of the pot a radiator to heat the kitchen; it does nothing at all to heat the contents of the pot; ideally, pots for cooking liquids would have insulated sidewalls to retain the het inside the pot, where it does the most good.

We have a somewhat broader range of “frying pans,” broadly construed (includes woks and sauteuses), because of the wide range of quantities that one cooks at one time on the stovetop, and because some operations require getting the hand tools all the way under the contents of the pan, and other operations risk spilling the contents onto the cooktop if the pan does not have a proper sidewall.  Pride of place goes to an antique cast iron Griswold (“ERIE” cast into the underside) skillet that is irreplaceable by any currently manufactured skillet, except Nambu Tetsu from the Morioka region:  the Erie, Pennsylvania, iron itself has a slightly different chemical and crystalline composition than other irons and it simply “cooks better” than other cast iron (except Nambu Tetsu).  We have a smaller (nominally 8 inch) Michael Lax enameled cast iron frypan that Samuel Farber, the brilliant founder of Copco, commissioned Lax to design and had a Danish company known for its cast iron home heating stoves to manufacture.  And we have a use-it-like-you-hate-it Matfer Bourgeat “black steel” 10 inch frying pan that gets as much use as (and probably more abuse than) probably any other pot or pan in our inventory.  As John Cameron Swayze used to say for Timex, "it takes a lickin’ and keeps on tickin’.“  Despite the comment above we never have sprung for a dedicated wok.

Of course, we have the mandatory Kuhn-Rikon Duromatic 9.5 inch “frying pan”; I cannot imagine cooking artichokes in any other manner, and there is no better pot for cooking risotto; but the Kuhn-Rikon also serves as a back-up for the other frying pans and regular pots.  We have two other Demeyere Apollo pots (a 1.7 liter saucepan and a 3.2 liter sauteuse,) a Mauviel Induc'inox 2 liter Windsor pot, a Michael Lax Copco lidded casserole for the oven, a tall and narrow Karen di ZANI 1.8 liter saucepan (Italian), and two pieces of Nambu Tetsu, one that some call a tempura pot (there is no better vessel to bake a Dutch Baby — German pancake/soufflé) and a smaller bail-handle cooking pot of similar shape.

That does it for our metal pots (we do have ceramic baking dishes and thermal glass loaf pans).  And, you know what?  In decades of constant use, we never have felt limited by our selection in any way.

Ok, sounds a bit crazy to thrown away pans from Mauriel, but I see what your point is.

SIMPLICITY.

My girlfriend is all about simplicity, since she is Asian and cook using a pot, a wok and frying pan.
While I do appreciate Asian food/Thai food, I find that I get really uninspired and tired of eating it in the long run, since it's always cooked almost the same way.
Okay, you change an ingredient here end there, but wok food, in my case after eating it a couple of 100 times just tastes.........boring and uninspiring.

I have no doubt, that you can cook wonderful meals in your few pans, that have a lot of variation in the taste and in the ingredients, but I was just giving you an example here.

I like to cook mostly European - I get 95% of my inspiration from France, Italy and Denmark, when I'm cooking.

Can I do just fine making a Minestrone soaps in a regular stainless steel pot - certainly.
Does using a quality cast iron cocotte makes the Minestrone soup taste that littel bit better - definitely.

Can I make a Boeuf Bourgignon in a big stainless steel pot and get a great tasty stew - YES, no doubt.
Does using a quality cast iron cocotte make the stew taste far better - MOST DEFINITELY.

Can I use my Mauviel Sauter pan for making coq au vin - 100% and it tastes awesome.
Does coq au vin just taste that little bit more intense and better, when I make it in my Staub cast iron braiser ? YES, it simply does.

But I admit, that I'm a gear head when it comes to pretty much everything.
I could live fine with 3-4 quality kitchen knifes, but it's just so much more fun AND effective, when you own 8-10 knifes, each knife covers a specific purpose.

But I know what you mean, sometimes less is more....

I went a bit overboard, when I ordered my Mauviel frying pans, do I really need one in 30cm, 28cm and 26cm - hell no, but I got an offer, when I bought so much Mauviel stuff at the same time, so I got the extra pan for a very fair price.
And I like to be able to have a pan size, that fits the vegetables I'm using that day.

I will also say, that I used to own far less kitchen gear than what I have now, and often I thought about making a dish, but then did not feel the inspiration, because I felt I owned inferior cook ware.
So when my OCD took a step back, and I refound my old hobby in the kitchen, I knew I would focus on getting cookware, that will not hold me back, when it comes to inspiration for new courses and the urge to just cook away.

I find inspiration rather than losing it from having lots of great cookware.

By the way, my entire present cookware collection works on induction.
The dream collection with Mauviel M250 copper does not.

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 03-26-2017, 03:59 AM
#10
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
User Info
(03-25-2017, 09:52 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: Ok, sounds a bit crazy to thrown away pans from Mauriel, but I see what your point is.

SIMPLICITY.

Can I do just fine making a Minestrone soaps in a regular stainless steel pot - certainly.
Does using a quality cast iron cocotte makes the Minestrone soup taste that littel bit better - definitely.

Can I make a Boeuf Bourgignon in a big stainless steel pot and get a great tasty stew - YES, no doubt.
Does using a quality cast iron cocotte make the stew taste far better - MOST DEFINITELY.

Can I use my Mauviel Sauter pan for making coq au vin - 100% and it tastes awesome.
Does coq au vin just taste that little bit more intense and better, when I make it in my Staub cast iron braiser ? YES, it simply does.

But I admit, that I'm a gear head when it comes to pretty much everything.

Heh.  Wink

Just to twist the knife a bit (the knife that I would be twisting, BTW, would be an Eberhard Schaaf Goldhamster “Ham & Cheese” knife with a kullenschliff edge), I note that both of your lists lack a pressure cooker.   Now, although it is a bit more difficult to regulate a pressure cooker precisely with an analogue heat source than with digitally regulated induction, it is quite possible; and the rewards are immense.  

I mentioned, in particular, artichokes and risotto. Cook a fresh artichoke in boiling water in your Mauviel Sauter pan and the artichoke will emerge military tank camouflage green with a mushy texture in the meat on the leaves; cook it in pressure cooker, and it will emerge a brilliant deep emerald green with the edible meat al dente, a completely different (and better) vegetable.   And, while there is tradition and romance in stirring a risotto for l-o-n-g periods of time standing at the cooktop, you can control the variables of heat and pressure and time very precisely with a pressure cooker, and (after some minimal trial and error, perhaps) the product will be better all around.  

So, if instead of subtracting, I should add an item to your list, I commend to your attention the Kuhn-Rikon Duromatic 9.5 inch “frying pan.”  It is the ultimate cooktop accessory for gearheads.

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 03-26-2017, 10:09 AM
#11
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(03-25-2017, 09:52 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: ...Can I do just fine making a Minestrone soaps in a regular stainless steel pot - certainly...

Ye ol' Freudian slip there, eh?

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 03-26-2017, 10:47 AM
#12
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(03-26-2017, 03:59 AM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(03-25-2017, 09:52 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: Ok, sounds a bit crazy to thrown away pans from Mauriel, but I see what your point is.

SIMPLICITY.

Can I do just fine making a Minestrone soaps in a regular stainless steel pot - certainly.
Does using a quality cast iron cocotte makes the Minestrone soup taste that littel bit better - definitely.

Can I make a Boeuf Bourgignon in a big stainless steel pot and get a great tasty stew - YES, no doubt.
Does using a quality cast iron cocotte make the stew taste far better - MOST DEFINITELY.

Can I use my Mauviel Sauter pan for making coq au vin - 100% and it tastes awesome.
Does coq au vin just taste that little bit more intense and better, when I make it in my Staub cast iron braiser ? YES, it simply does.

But I admit, that I'm a gear head when it comes to pretty much everything.

Heh.  Wink

Just to twist the knife a bit (the knife that I would be twisting, BTW, would be an Eberhard Schaaf Goldhamster “Ham & Cheese” knife with a kullenschliff edge), I note that both of your lists lack a pressure cooker.   Now, although it is a bit more difficult to regulate a pressure cooker precisely with an analogue heat source than with digitally regulated induction, it is quite possible; and the rewards are immense.  

I mentioned, in particular, artichokes and risotto. Cook a fresh artichoke in boiling water in your Mauviel Sauter pan and the artichoke will emerge military tank camouflage green with a mushy texture in the meat on the leaves; cook it in pressure cooker, and it will emerge a brilliant deep emerald green with the edible meat al dente, a completely different (and better) vegetable.   And, while there is tradition and romance in stirring a risotto for l-o-n-g periods of time standing at the cooktop, you can control the variables of heat and pressure and time very precisely with a pressure cooker, and (after some minimal trial and error, perhaps) the product will be better all around.  

So, if instead of subtracting, I should add an item to your list, I commend to your attention the Kuhn-Rikon Duromatic 9.5 inch “frying pan.”  It is the ultimate cooktop accessory for gearheads.

I might add a pressure cooker to my arsenal later on, based on your recommendations - BUT I make Risotto once a week, year round, and I would never dream of making it in anything else but my beloved sauter pan, now a Mauviel Sauter pan, but any sauter pan will work.

I mostly make a NON-Classic risotto dish, where I add extra stuff to the dish (mushrooms, sellery, sausage, bacon, carrots, spinach etc.), so it functions as main course/dish.
 
Once in a while I do make the classic basic Risotto, just with chicken stock, white wine, cheese and onions, but then it just works as a side dish.

It would be a sacrilege to make risotto in any other way, than in a sauter pan IMHO

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 03-26-2017, 02:46 PM
#13
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(03-26-2017, 10:47 AM)CHSeifert Wrote: I make Risotto once a week, year round, and I would never dream of making it in anything else but my beloved sauter pan, now a Mauviel Sauter pan, but any sauter pan will work.

It would be a sacrilege to make risotto in any other way, than in a sauter pan IMHO

Déjà vu.  I engaged in exactly this on-line conversation five or six years ago with a colleague (retired acquatic biologist) in Essex, England, on a classical music maillist.  (I am an equal opportunity off-topic poster.)  He, too, is a hobbyist gourmet cook, and a frequent (traditional method) preparer of risotto, and he regards himself as an expert on the subject.  He got quite worked up, over a series of several messages posted over the course of several days, on the subject of how risotto must prepared; he recruited allies to his side of the argument; and he even suggested that — functionally, if not grammatically — “risotto” acts as a verb that indicates the manner of preparation as much as it does the final product.  The discussion eventually petered out, with neither side conceding defeat or proclaiming victory.

Three or four months ago, my colleague spontaneously initiated a new thread on the same maillist.  He recently had acquired his first pressure cooker (having in the meantime converted from gas to induction as an energy source for his cooking), and decided to try making risotto “just this once” in the pressure cooker — all to confirm his previous strongly held opinion, mind you.

The product was the best risotto ever, in his own humble(d) opinion.  He now acknowledges that he is a convert.

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 03-26-2017, 03:55 PM
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What a surprise. :-)

Long ago I stopped arguing with folks who know more than I do. I just let them be, bound in tradition or whatever.

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 03-26-2017, 04:42 PM
#15
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(03-26-2017, 02:46 PM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(03-26-2017, 10:47 AM)CHSeifert Wrote: I make Risotto once a week, year round, and I would never dream of making it in anything else but my beloved sauter pan, now a Mauviel Sauter pan, but any sauter pan will work.

It would be a sacrilege to make risotto in any other way, than in a sauter pan IMHO

Déjà vu.  I engaged in exactly this on-line conversation five or six years ago with a colleague (retired acquatic biologist) in Essex, England, on a classical music maillist.  (I am an equal opportunity off-topic poster.)  He, too, is a hobbyist gourmet cook, and a frequent (traditional method) preparer of risotto, and he regards himself as an expert on the subject.  He got quite worked up, over a series of several messages posted over the course of several days, on the subject of how risotto must prepared; he recruited allies to his side of the argument; and he even suggested that — functionally, if not grammatically — “risotto” acts as a verb that indicates the manner of preparation as much as it does the final product.  The discussion eventually petered out, with neither side conceding defeat or proclaiming victory.

Three or four months ago, my colleague spontaneously initiated a new thread on the same maillist.  He recently had acquired his first pressure cooker (having in the meantime converted from gas to induction as an energy source for his cooking), and decided to try making risotto “just this once” in the pressure cooker — all to confirm his previous strongly held opinion, mind you.

The product was the best risotto ever, in his own humble(d) opinion.  He now acknowledges that he is a convert.

Dear Mel;

Hope your recovery is advancing.

Great story. Such is the process of maturity. Never say never. I am a devoted pressure cooker cook, and am looking into it right now. Cooking rice in it i mean.

Rice and risottos are the most important part of the puerto rican diet. I just mentioned pressure cooking it to my girlfriend Damaris. I did not like her long stare. I guess my mother would have a heart attack, god bless her soul.

Best regards,

Pp


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 03-26-2017, 05:03 PM
#16
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(03-26-2017, 02:46 PM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(03-26-2017, 10:47 AM)CHSeifert Wrote: I make Risotto once a week, year round, and I would never dream of making it in anything else but my beloved sauter pan, now a Mauviel Sauter pan, but any sauter pan will work.

It would be a sacrilege to make risotto in any other way, than in a sauter pan IMHO

Déjà vu.  I engaged in exactly this on-line conversation five or six years ago with a colleague (retired acquatic biologist) in Essex, England, on a classical music maillist.  (I am an equal opportunity off-topic poster.)  He, too, is a hobbyist gourmet cook, and a frequent (traditional method) preparer of risotto, and he regards himself as an expert on the subject.  He got quite worked up, over a series of several messages posted over the course of several days, on the subject of how risotto must prepared; he recruited allies to his side of the argument; and he even suggested that — functionally, if not grammatically — “risotto” acts as a verb that indicates the manner of preparation as much as it does the final product.  The discussion eventually petered out, with neither side conceding defeat or proclaiming victory.

Three or four months ago, my colleague spontaneously initiated a new thread on the same maillist.  He recently had acquired his first pressure cooker (having in the meantime converted from gas to induction as an energy source for his cooking), and decided to try making risotto “just this once” in the pressure cooker — all to confirm his previous strongly held opinion, mind you.

The product was the best risotto ever, in his own humble(d) opinion.  He now acknowledges that he is a convert.

Look, I was just kidding about the Risotto sacrilege.......

I'm in favour of doing what works for each individual.

I can not get worked up over a dish, certainly not Risotto.
I have no doubt, that if you say Risotto is better made in a pressure cooker, that it probably is.

But I enjoy the whole process of making my Risotto in the sauter pan, the old fashioned way.

I usually drink a glass wine or two, while I slowly add the stock and gradually add the vegetables to the risotto at the appropriate time.
For me Risotto is all about relaxing while watching the process, adding the stock slowly. I find it less charming to watch a pressure cooker, while it makes risotto - I'm sorry, but it sounds like it take the whole soul out of risotto.

Also - if you like sauter'ed vegetables in your risotto, like I do, how do you tehcnically make this part of the risotto dish, if you make the risotto in a pressure cooker without boiling the vegetables ?

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 03-26-2017, 05:07 PM
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(03-26-2017, 03:55 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: What a surprise. :-)

Long ago I stopped arguing with folks who know more than I do. I just let them be, bound in tradition or whatever.

I'm open for suggestions and new ways to cook.

I'm a tech geek too, so if anything can be done more effectively and taste better at the same time, I'm all in.

Again - if you like sauter'ed vegetables in your risotto, like I do, how do you technically add these to the risotto dish, while it is being made in the pressure cooker, without boiling the vegetables ?

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 03-26-2017, 06:03 PM
#18
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(03-26-2017, 05:07 PM)CHSeifert Wrote:
(03-26-2017, 03:55 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: What a surprise. :-)

Long ago I stopped arguing with folks who know more than I do. I just let them be, bound in tradition or whatever.

I'm open for suggestions and new ways to cook.

I'm a tech geek too, so if anything can be done more effectively and taste better at the same time, I'm all in.

Again - if you like sauter'ed vegetables in your risotto, like I do, how do you technically add these to the risotto dish, while it is being made in the pressure cooker, without boiling the vegetables ?


Maybe in two cooking cycles?

Cook. Stop. Open. Mix. Cook again. Ready!


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 03-26-2017, 06:26 PM
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(03-26-2017, 06:03 PM)carlospppena Wrote:
(03-26-2017, 05:07 PM)CHSeifert Wrote:
(03-26-2017, 03:55 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: What a surprise. :-)

Long ago I stopped arguing with folks who know more than I do. I just let them be, bound in tradition or whatever.

I'm open for suggestions and new ways to cook.

I'm a tech geek too, so if anything can be done more effectively and taste better at the same time, I'm all in.

Again - if you like sauter'ed vegetables in your risotto, like I do, how do you technically add these to the risotto dish, while it is being made in the pressure cooker, without boiling the vegetables ?


Maybe in two cooking cycles?

Cook. Stop. Open. Mix. Cook again. Ready!  


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Problem is that a pressure cooker boils the rice and everything in it.

I like to sauter the vegetables I put in my risotto beforehand, and sear the bacon/sausage and then later in the process add this to the risotto.

Any kind of boiling of these vegetables and meat will ruin the crispiness to the best of my logic, which makes the pressure cooker unsuited for this type of risotto, unless you are making the classic risotto, where you only use risotto rice, wine, cheese, onions and stock.

I can see the Risotto classic side dish made in a pressure cooker, but as soon as you add sauter vegetables and seared bacon/sausage to the risotto dish, the pressure cooker is useless for this.

Besides this, if I don't add anything to my risotto, but the basics, I can make it in 15-20 minutes and then rest it under the lid for 10 minutes and it's done.
Risotto doesn't have to take an hour to make, if you make the classic version.

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 03-26-2017, 06:29 PM
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(03-26-2017, 06:26 PM)CHSeifert Wrote:
(03-26-2017, 06:03 PM)carlospppena Wrote:
(03-26-2017, 05:07 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: I'm open for suggestions and new ways to cook.

I'm a tech geek too, so if anything can be done more effectively and taste better at the same time, I'm all in.

Again - if you like sauter'ed vegetables in your risotto, like I do, how do you technically add these to the risotto dish, while it is being made in the pressure cooker, without boiling the vegetables ?


Maybe in two cooking cycles?

Cook. Stop. Open. Mix. Cook again. Ready!  


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


Problem is that a pressure cooker boils the rice and everything in it.

I like to sauter the vegetables I put in my risotto beforehand, and sear the bacon/sausage and then later in the process add this to the risotto.

Any kind of boiling of these vegetables and meat will ruin the crispiness to the best of my logic, which makes the pressure cooker unsuited for this type of risotto, unless you are making the classic risotto, where you only use risotto rice, wine, cheese, onions and stock.

I can see the Risotto classic side dish made in a pressure cooker, but as soon as you add sauter vegetables and seared bacon/sausage to the risotto dish, the pressure cooker is useless for this.


Yes Claus, but... ever heard of pressure frying?


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