01-24-2018, 05:07 AM
#21
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is there really any money savings in home roasting?  these machines seem to cost a lot of money...  I understand with shaving.  it saves money in the long run.  How would one formulate a good northern italian style espresso blend?

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 01-24-2018, 07:54 AM
#22
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
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[quote='asiliski' pid='851723' dateline='1516799269']
is there really any money savings in home roasting?  these machines seem to cost a lot of money...  I understand with shaving.  it saves money in the long run.  How would one formulate a good northern italian style espresso blend?
Shaving is a good comparison to home roasting. If shaving with canned foam and using a cartridge razor pleases you. Then why change? On the other hand, if you want coffee which has subtleties and flavor changes as the cup cools, then you might want to home roast. Store bought specialty roasted coffee can fetch upwards of $15 a pound. The green beans that yielded that specialty coffee can be purchased for between 5 and 8 a pound. If instant coffee pleases you stay with the instant.
As to the second question, it can take a lifetime for you to learn the answer. Anyone can turn coffee beans brown. The art of roasting takes a lifetime to learn. That's one of the things that makes roasting coffee a delight.

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 01-25-2018, 07:12 PM
#23
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(01-24-2018, 05:07 AM)asiliski Wrote: is there really any money savings in home roasting?  these machines seem to cost a lot of money...  I understand with shaving.  it saves money in the long run.  How would one formulate a good northern italian style espresso blend?
What Barrylu said...

You do not need a dedicated machine to roast beans.  A skillet and a wood spoon on your backyard grill will teach you plenty about roasting with no cost but a few beans.  Buy a pound from Sweet Maria's, check out the library while you're there.  Pay attention while you burn a batch or two and you'll be on your way to better coffee every morning and decide if it's worth the effort.  

The dedicated machines let you program profiles to match a particular bean, repeat it faithfully and manage smoke and/or chaff and stop the roast for you.  Pretty cool.  But you can roast good coffee without.   

I have a low cost investment in air poppers and see no need to move up until they crash.  When these give up I'll build a drum roaster run by the Dewalt cordless and it's back to where it all started, the grill.  Not fancy, just good coffee and good fun.

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 05-07-2018, 01:25 PM
#24
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(01-25-2018, 07:12 PM)old school Wrote:
(01-24-2018, 05:07 AM)asiliski Wrote: is there really any money savings in home roasting?  these machines seem to cost a lot of money...  I understand with shaving.  it saves money in the long run.  How would one formulate a good northern italian style espresso blend?
What Barrylu said...

You do not need a dedicated machine to roast beans.  A skillet and a wood spoon on your backyard grill will teach you plenty about roasting with no cost but a few beans.  Buy a pound from Sweet Maria's, check out the library while you're there.  Pay attention while you burn a batch or two and you'll be on your way to better coffee every morning and decide if it's worth the effort.  

The dedicated machines let you program profiles to match a particular bean, repeat it faithfully and manage smoke and/or chaff and stop the roast for you.  Pretty cool.  But you can roast good coffee without.   

I have a low cost investment in air poppers and see no need to move up until they crash.  When these give up I'll build a drum roaster run by the Dewalt cordless and it's back to where it all started, the grill.  Not fancy, just good coffee and good fun.

Hi Guys,

I've been roasting in a progressive series of roasters, kind of like shaving with a progressive parade of razors, lathering with same routine for brushes.

 It's a wonderful thing for anyone to get into. BarryLu is right on I say ditto to that.

My first roaster was cast iron skillet, then air popper, Stircrazy Popper modified with a round little "convection oven top", then Alpen Roast, Behmor, 

Sonofresco 1#er, Rk Drum 6#er, Rk Drum 8#er, (which I recently sold..too heavy full of beans with blown shoulder)

 I guess my "go to" roaster is the RK Drum 6#er.

   Over the years, I have been steadily increasing my coffee customer base, word of mouth is all it takes and the RK 6 gets me 8-10 oz bags of specialty coffee.

Just the look of amazement and surprise on some Folger's drinking friend's faces upon tasting a light roasted Kenyan or Dry Processed Ethiopian  

is something to behold.

   A nice Central always puts a smile on coffee lover's faces as well.

The Sonofresco is a wonderful roaster but with the quantity limitation of 1# just not enough to keep up for my needs.

When some of my cowboy buddies up here on Palomar Mountain ask me if the specialty coffees I roast are actually worth the extra cost over Yuban or Folger's...

I say, "Well, here's the deal...would you rather feed your horse fresh, wholesome, origin traceable oats, or oats that have been through another horse"?

That's when I get their attentioin!

Chef Glenn (retired)

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 05-07-2018, 01:42 PM
#25
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
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Amen brother. I am on the list to get an Aillio Bullet. 1K capacity ability to do back to back roasts all day

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 05-09-2018, 02:46 PM
#26
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When some of my cowboy buddies up here on Palomar Mountain ask me if the specialty coffees I roast are actually worth the extra cost over Yuban or Folger's...

I say, "Well, here's the deal...would you rather feed your horse fresh, wholesome, origin traceable oats, or oats that have been through another horse"?

That's when I get their attentioin!

I'm not a coffee drinker, tried it once, not for me. But , isn't one of the most expensive coffees, one that Does just what you wouldn't do for your horse?
Except , the coffee berries are eaten by a ferret, then thru the ferret, collected and drank...... Rolleyes

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 05-09-2018, 03:10 PM
#27
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
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(05-09-2018, 02:46 PM)zipper Wrote: When some of my cowboy buddies up here on Palomar Mountain ask me if the specialty coffees I roast are actually worth the extra cost over Yuban or Folger's...

I say, "Well, here's the deal...would you rather feed your horse fresh, wholesome, origin traceable oats, or oats that have been through another horse"?

That's when I get their attentioin!

I'm not a coffee drinker, tried it once, not for me. But , isn't one of the most expensive coffees, one that Does just what you wouldn't do for your horse?
Except , the coffee berries are eaten by a ferret, then thru the ferret, collected and drank...... Rolleyes
Civet Cat It’s Robusta coffee it’s all hype and torture for the animal

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 05-15-2018, 08:30 PM
#28
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(05-09-2018, 03:10 PM)Barrylu Wrote: Civet Cat It’s Robusta coffee it’s all hype and torture for the animal

Here's a good article expanding on why not to drink civet cat coffee...
http://nordiccoffeeculture.com/what-kopi...-avoid-it/

As for the topic of home roasting, it could save money if you are able to source high quality green beans. But it is like cooking in that it takes some practice and experience, and you have to be interested in the journey. For me, I'd rather buy the roasted coffee but I totally get the interest in home roasting - control, experimentation, etc. I usually follow a recipe when I cook so that isn't a similar interest I can cultivate with the coffee roasting. Brewing is enough parameters to tweak.

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 05-16-2018, 03:16 AM
#29
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(05-15-2018, 08:30 PM)Gig103 Wrote:
(05-09-2018, 03:10 PM)Barrylu Wrote: Civet Cat It’s Robusta coffee it’s all hype and torture for the animal

Here's a good article expanding on why not to drink civet cat coffee...
http://nordiccoffeeculture.com/what-kopi...-avoid-it/

As for the topic of home roasting, it could save money if you are able to source high quality green beans. But it is like cooking in that it takes some practice and experience, and you have to be interested in the journey. For me, I'd rather buy the roasted coffee but I totally get the interest in home roasting - control, experimentation, etc. I usually follow a recipe when I cook so that isn't a similar interest I can cultivate with the coffee roasting. Brewing is enough parameters to tweak.

'more or less hunting for poo truffles' totally puts this stuff in perspective.  I drink stove top espresso (brikka) with low acid italian style beans.  Nothing fancy, but tastes great.

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 05-16-2018, 03:34 AM
#30
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Wow, good to know I have a solid reason not to drink Civet Cat Poo!

Regarding money savings, if one goes with a dedicated roaster (as opposed to a popcorn cooker or pan on the grill), I think the cost of equipment eats up a lot of the savings.  Given the cost of green beans and the yield (about 85% -- roasted beans have less weight than green beans), I figure I pay about $8 per pound of exceptional roasted coffee.  That's a pretty good savings off of the retail cost of premium fresh-roasted coffee.  But the equipment doesn't last forever without maintenance or replacement costs, so if you amortize the cost of a good roaster over its useful life, the cost per pound goes up.  I haven't done the math, but I think in the long run there isn't much money savings.  Some, but probably not the reason most people roast at home.

But what you get is (a) fresh roasted beans, never again worrying about stale store-bought beans; (b) coffee exactly how you like it, with different coffee varieties to try; and © a cool fun hobby the results of which you can share with friends and family.

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 06-06-2018, 03:09 PM
#31
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
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OK I just pulled the pin and ordered a Aillio Bullet Roaster. I can just hear Ricky Ricardo saying: "Lucy you have a lot splainin to do."
[Image: TrxPAuZ.jpg]

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 06-06-2018, 03:17 PM
#32
  • Sully
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  • Cedar Park, Texas
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(06-06-2018, 03:09 PM)Barrylu Wrote: OK I just pulled the pin and ordered a Aillio Bullet Roaster. I can just hear Ricky Ricardo saying: "Lucy you have a lot splainin to do."
[Image: TrxPAuZ.jpg]
Congratulations Barry!  I've been looking at the Aillio as my next roaster.  Enjoy!

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