04-24-2017, 01:33 PM
#1
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I have been rotating four razors--a 1951 Gillette Aristocrat, a 1952 Made in Canada ball end Tech, a gold Tech from the 1940s, and a 1974 long handle Super Adjustable (Black Beauty). If I had to justify the rotation, I would be hard pressed to say that one shave differed much from another. I honestly think it's the sense of history more than anything else. Especially with the Techs, I marvel at the simplicity of the design and wonder sometimes how many items produced today will last as long. The Aristocrat is beautiful to look at, and so forth. So is wet shaving with vintage razors mostly psychological?

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 04-24-2017, 02:09 PM
#2
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Sure it is the sense of history, and the fact that we like/love these obscure objects of desire. As opposed to shaving with whatever instrument just to get it over with. The shaver, be it current, vintage, DE, SE or straight, if it is something we appreciate the way we do our favorite brushes, soaps, creams ...... it adds to the experience and changes it from a chore to a something we look forward to. IMHO.  Smile

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 04-24-2017, 05:45 PM
#3
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(04-24-2017, 02:09 PM)JimmyH Wrote: Sure it is the sense of history, and the fact that we like/love these obscure objects of desire. As opposed to shaving with whatever instrument just to get it over with. The shaver, be it current, vintage, DE, SE or straight, if it is something we appreciate the way we do our favorite brushes, soaps, creams ...... it adds to the experience and changes it from a chore to a something we look forward to. IMHO.  Smile


Beautifully put, good sir.


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 04-24-2017, 06:53 PM
#4
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(04-24-2017, 01:33 PM)Ilnones Wrote: I have been rotating four razors--a 1951 Gillette Aristocrat, a 1952 Made in Canada ball end Tech, a gold Tech from the 1940s, and a 1974 long handle Super Adjustable (Black Beauty). If I had to justify the rotation, I would be hard pressed to say that one shave differed much from another. I honestly think it's the sense of history more than anything else. Especially with the Techs, I marvel at the simplicity of the design and wonder sometimes how many items produced today will last as long. The Aristocrat is beautiful to look at, and so forth. So is wet shaving with vintage razors mostly psychological?

I believe wet shaving and rotating razors, be they vintage, modern, or anything in between, offers much more than a basic psychological effect. It embodies the joy of shaving in a manner that takes forethought, technique, skill, and the revival of a shaving method that has been a lost art for men and women for far too long. On a practical note, the vintage razors we seek were the technology of the day and thus, are the right tool for the job. Moreover, they are beautiful to behold, let alone actually use. The resurgence of wet shaving has invited young and old people to share in a piece of history that we don't often get to share and that is tremendous.

Geofatboy of Shave Nation says, "Have a great shave, have a great day," which I find to be spot on in my case, and I dare say many other folks as well. I find accomplishing a great shave first thing in the morning, the time spent, the feeling of fantastic lather, and the wonderful aromatic fragrances make for a creative and invigorating start to the day.

I feel a great sense of history and connection with family and the past when I shave with my grandfather's last DE razor, a 1959 Gillette Super Speed Flare Tip E-1. I am looking for an original Gillette 1917 Military shaving set (khaki) in good condition, which was the model I believe my grandfather received as part of his issue as a soldier fighting with the U.S. Army in WWI. That said, it is as emotional as it is psychological for me.


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 04-28-2017, 05:17 PM
#5
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Bayside, NY
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(04-24-2017, 06:53 PM)Dchalfy01 Wrote:
(04-24-2017, 01:33 PM)Ilnones Wrote: I have been rotating four razors--a 1951 Gillette Aristocrat, a 1952 Made in Canada ball end Tech, a gold Tech from the 1940s, and a 1974 long handle Super Adjustable (Black Beauty). If I had to justify the rotation, I would be hard pressed to say that one shave differed much from another. I honestly think it's the sense of history more than anything else. Especially with the Techs, I marvel at the simplicity of the design and wonder sometimes how many items produced today will last as long. The Aristocrat is beautiful to look at, and so forth. So is wet shaving with vintage razors mostly psychological?

I believe wet shaving and rotating razors, be they vintage, modern, or anything in between, offers much more than a basic psychological effect. It embodies the joy of shaving in a manner that takes forethought, technique, skill, and the revival of a shaving method that has been a lost art for men and women for far too long. On a practical note, the vintage razors we seek were the technology of the day and thus, are the right tool for the job. Moreover, they are beautiful to behold, let alone actually use. The resurgence of wet shaving has invited young and old people to share in a piece of history that we don't often get to share and that is tremendous.

Geofatboy of Shave Nation says, "Have a great shave, have a great day," which I find to be spot on in my case, and I dare say many other folks as well. I find accomplishing a great shave first thing in the morning, the time spent, the feeling of fantastic lather, and the wonderful aromatic fragrances make for a creative and invigorating start to the day.

I feel a great sense of history and connection with family and the past when I shave with my grandfather's last DE razor, a 1959 Gillette Super Speed Flare Tip E-1. I am looking for an original Gillette 1917 Military shaving set (khaki) in good condition, which was the model I believe my grandfather received as part of his issue as a soldier fighting with the U.S. Army in WWI. That said, it is as emotional as it is psychological for me.


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Yes, I agree. Old razors are so NOT run-of-the-mill. They were used daily by their owners for decades. It makes sense that a razor would develop quirks and idiosyncrasies based on the owner's technique, and all that entails. Kind of like breaking in a car, y'know what I mean? Each of my vintage razors has it's own unique personality. Truly. Like quality vintage guitars, each old razor has a distinctive personality, separate from all other razors, even of the same model.

I go through phases and have/had multiple copies of many razors, Techs, Red Tips, Super Speeds, Super Adjustables, Featherweights, Injectors. Every single one is different. So unlike the mass produced nonsense most modern shavers use. That was me for a very long time! When I become the caretaker of a new vintage piece, and often during subsequent shaves, I ask so many questions; Who was the original owner? What became of him? What were his interests? Who did he love? Was he a musician? What was his job? As Yul Brynner would say, "etcetera, etcetera, etcetera."

I'm quite envious of the fortunate folks who own and hopefully even use family heirlooms. I sadly don't own any. My first vintage razor was a 9+ birth quarter ball end Tech. RAD bit fast and hard. For way longer than I ever expected I couldn't stop. There were many months when three packages arrived at my door. I've given away more razors than I can recall, only to buy another one just like the first.

Yeah, it's definitely psychological.

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 04-28-2017, 05:44 PM
#6
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Bayside, NY
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Ok, so I read my post and will now try to actually address the topic. I'm currently rotating favorites of Fat Handle Tech, Red Tip, Injector and Featherweight. They all shave differently, and I really enjoy every shave with each one.

I just counted. Presently at 24 razors, 20 vintage. Just for variety and shave quality only, I could be very happy with my top four for the rest of my life. But for even greater variety of eye candy and OCDness, I'm really thrilled to have assembled such a sweet assortment of shaving history.

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 04-28-2017, 08:19 PM
#7
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(04-28-2017, 05:44 PM)chazt Wrote: Ok, so I read my post and will now try to actually address the topic. I'm currently rotating favorites of Fat Handle Tech, Red Tip, Injector and Featherweight. They all shave differently, and I really enjoy every shave with each one.

I just counted. Presently at 24 razors, 20 vintage. Just for variety and shave quality only, I could be very happy with my top four for the rest of my life. But for even greater variety of eye candy and OCDness, I'm really thrilled to have assembled such a sweet assortment of shaving history.

But do they all really shave that much differently? I think it's mostly psychological. A shave is a shave; it's not all that complex. DE razors are definitely superior to the pull-and-drag cartridge monstrosities, but the basic design of the DE razor is pretty simple. The TTO adds a bit of heft, but the difference between it and the Tech is small. Beyond a certain point, the collection of more and more razors becomes pathological. Just sayin.

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 04-28-2017, 10:01 PM
#8
  • SCOV
  • Active Member
  • Minnesota
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Is psychological a 1970 454 LS7 Corvette or a 2017 Z06 Corvette?  Both are fast and increase testosterone levels.  I would love to own either with nostalgia wanting the 1970 and liking nice new things wanting the Z06.  If my choice meets my needs, then good choice.
  
Using grandfather's old Gillette is sentimental and special.  Buying a red tip on eBay is different.

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 04-29-2017, 06:20 AM
#9
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Bayside, NY
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(04-28-2017, 08:19 PM)Ilnones Wrote:
(04-28-2017, 05:44 PM)chazt Wrote: Ok, so I read my post and will now try to actually address the topic. I'm currently rotating favorites of Fat Handle Tech, Red Tip, Injector and Featherweight. They all shave differently, and I really enjoy every shave with each one.

I just counted. Presently at 24 razors, 20 vintage. Just for variety and shave quality only, I could be very happy with my top four for the rest of my life. But for even greater variety of eye candy and OCDness, I'm really thrilled to have assembled such a sweet assortment of shaving history.

But do they all really shave that much differently? I think it's mostly psychological. A shave is a shave; it's not all that complex. DE razors are definitely superior to the pull-and-drag cartridge monstrosities, but the basic design of the DE razor is pretty simple. The TTO adds a bit of heft, but the difference between it and the Tech is small. Beyond a certain point, the collection of more and more razors becomes pathological. Just sayin.

Yes, actually. The 4 razors in my rotation do all shave differently. The caveat here is, yeah, it's probably all about technique, but there are definite differences in the shaves from each one. The Tech is totally non-aggressive but very decently efficient. It would be an effort to cut or nick myself with the Tech. The Red Tip is a bit more aggressive and efficient, and blood is possible if attention wanes. From either Gillette I can easily get by with a 2 pass DFS and be clean for hours. The Featherweight gives a wonderful 3 pass shave, but if I stop at 2 passes stubble remains. The Schick otoh is Super Efficient. With proper technique, care and attention I can get a near BBS shave with 1 pass and touch ups.

I don't disagree with your point about "pathological." Beyond mere "fun," my rationale for collecting them is 1, I really dig using and looking at them. 2, they're artifacts of a bygone era. 3, I can afford them. 4, They're totally different from but just as cool as guitars. 5, collecting them doesn't hurt anyone, 6, I don't gamble or fool around and my wife's admonitions and protests to new acquisitions begin and end with a mere roll of the eyes. She's essentially green-lighted my hobbies and obsessions, so I'm good to go!

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 05-01-2017, 04:50 PM
#10
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(04-29-2017, 06:20 AM)chazt Wrote:
(04-28-2017, 08:19 PM)Ilnones Wrote:
(04-28-2017, 05:44 PM)chazt Wrote: Ok, so I read my post and will now try to actually address the topic. I'm currently rotating favorites of Fat Handle Tech, Red Tip, Injector and Featherweight. They all shave differently, and I really enjoy every shave with each one.

I just counted. Presently at 24 razors, 20 vintage. Just for variety and shave quality only, I could be very happy with my top four for the rest of my life. But for even greater variety of eye candy and OCDness, I'm really thrilled to have assembled such a sweet assortment of shaving history.

But do they all really shave that much differently? I think it's mostly psychological. A shave is a shave; it's not all that complex. DE razors are definitely superior to the pull-and-drag cartridge monstrosities, but the basic design of the DE razor is pretty simple. The TTO adds a bit of heft, but the difference between it and the Tech is small. Beyond a certain point, the collection of more and more razors becomes pathological. Just sayin.

Yes, actually. The 4 razors in my rotation do all shave differently. The caveat here is, yeah, it's probably all about technique, but there are definite differences in the shaves from each one. The Tech is totally non-aggressive but very decently efficient. It would be an effort to cut or nick myself with the Tech. The Red Tip is a bit more aggressive and efficient, and blood is possible if attention wanes. From either Gillette I can easily get by with a 2 pass DFS and be clean for hours. The Featherweight gives a wonderful 3 pass shave, but if I stop at 2 passes stubble remains. The Schick otoh is Super Efficient. With proper technique, care and attention I can get a near BBS shave with 1 pass and touch ups.

I don't disagree with your point about "pathological." Beyond mere "fun," my rationale for collecting them is 1, I really dig using and looking at them. 2, they're artifacts of a bygone era. 3, I can afford them. 4, They're totally different from but just as cool as guitars. 5, collecting them doesn't hurt anyone, 6, I don't gamble or fool around and my wife's admonitions and protests to new acquisitions begin and end with a mere roll of the eyes. She's essentially green-lighted my hobbies and obsessions, so I'm good to go!

That's the best rationale for collecting razors I have ever read. Mazel tov on your wife.

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 05-03-2017, 11:34 AM
#11
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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I honestly don't know.
But I like old things. Stereo equipment, books, knives, straight, hand tools like chisels, planes, spokeshaves, etc., furniture, on and on. I believe there is some nostalgia there, but to me there is also a grace and beauty to something well made, that aged well also. And a great joy in restoring them to use again.
Not sure what to call that, but it sure is fun.
Smile

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